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Full text of "The Maryland Magazine"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/marym32univ 



lumni Publication of the University of Maryland 



magazine 




Volume XXXII: Number One • November-December 196' 






University Honors Convocation • Homecoming • A Time of Wonder 







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PERPETUAL 



BUILDING ASSOCIATION 



EDWARD C. BAITZ, Prendenl 
DOWNTOWN: 11th A E Streets, N.W. 
ANACOSTIA: 1340 Good Hope Road 

BETHESDA-CHEVV CHASE: Wise. Ave. at Montgomery 
MIDTCWN: 808 Connecticut Avenue N W. 
PRINCE OEOROE8: 7118 Marlboro Pike 
QUEEN'S CHAPEL: 3410 Hamilton Street 
SILVER SPRINO: Georgia Ave. at Cameron 

Assets Over $350,000,000 



^jjTTttY' 

JJp 

EHUD" stS 



IVEMT'yla.ncl 




The Cover: Child patients in University Hospital attend to the sights 
and sounds of Christmas. This photograph was taken last year bj \l 
Danegger, Head, Photographic Laboratory. 



the 




NOVEMBER - DECEMBER • 1960 



magazine 

Volume XXXII 



Number 1 



Alumni Publication of 
the University of Maryland 

BOARD OF REGENTS 

CHARLES P. McCORMICK, Chairman 

EDWARD F. HOLTER, Vice-Chairman 

B. HERBERT BROWN, Secretary 
HARRY H. NUTTLE, Treasurer 
LOUIS L. KAPLAN, Assistant Secretary 

C. EWING TUTTLE, Assistant Treasurer 
RICHARD W. CASE 

THOMAS W. PANGBORN 
THOMAS B. SYMONS 
WILLIAM C. WALSH 
MRS. JOHN L. WHITEHURST 



DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 
President of the University 



OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
ROBERT J. MCCARTNEY, Director 



ROBERT H. BREUNIG, Editor 
CAROL E. PITTMAN, Assistant Editor 
JOSEPH F. BLAIR, Sports Editor 
AL DANEGGER, Staff Photographer 



OFFICE OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 
C. WILBUR CISSEL, Director 



OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

MRS. ELIZABETH ROHR SINGLETON, '47, President 
DR. WILLIAM H. TRIPLETT, '11, Vice-President 
DR. REGINALD V. TRUITT, '14, Vice-President 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, '38, Executive Secretary 
VICTOR HOLM, '57, Assistant Secretary 



OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELATIONS 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, Director 



ADVERTISING DIRECTOR 



SALLY L. OGDEN 

18 W. 25th Street 2500 Wise. Ave., N. W. 
Baltimore 18 Md. Washington, D. C. 

(HO 7-9018) (FE 7-2113) 



In This Issue — 




FEATURES 




2 


The Alumni Diary 


3 


Alumni and Campus Notes 


5 


First University Honors Convocation 


9 


Alumni Attend a Winning Homecoming 


12 


A Time of Wonder 


14 


When the Civil War Came to Maryland 


16 


Do You Remember? 


17 


Maryland Books and Authors 


18 


University Sports 


NEWS FROM THE SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 




20 


Agriculture 


22 


Arts and Sciences 


26 


Business and Public Administration 


32 


Dentistry 


33 


Education 


37 


Engineering 


44 


Home Economics 


44 


Medicine 


46 


Nursing 


48 


Pharmacy 


50 


University College 


52 


Social Notes 


53 


Completed Careers 




Published Bi-Monthly at the University of Maryland, and entered at the Post Office 




College Park, Md., as second class mail matter under the Act of Congress of March 3, 



The General Alumni Council 

school and college 
represent.! ti i 'es : 

ai.ri c u nil t 

H. M. Carroll, '20 
Paul M. Galbreath. '39 
Howard L. Stier, '32 

ARTS I SCI I- N I 

Charles F. Ellinger. '37 

John L. Lampe, '50 

Dr. Reginald V. Truitt, '14 

BUSINESS & PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

Thomas E. Bourne, Jr., '43 
Ralph W. Frey, Jr.. '41 
Chester W. Tawney, '3 1 

DENTISTRY 

Dr. Samuel Bryant. '32 
Dr. Harry Levin, '26 
Dr. Edward D. Stone, '25 

EDUCATION 

Clara Dixon, '34 
Harry Hasslinger, '33 
Loren Lee Lindley, '48 

I N GI NEERI N G 

Emmett Loane, '29 
Robert J. McLeod, '37 
John E. Waldo, '57 

II II F. F. CO N M I CS 

Mrs. Erna R. Chapman, '34 
Mrs. Ruth T. Clarke, '42 
Mrs. Jane M. West, '40 

Emory H. Niles, '17 
Layman J. Redden, '34 
G. Kenneth Reiblich, '29 

MEDICINE 

Dr. Thurston R. Adams, '34 
Dr. Daniel J. Pessagno, '20 
Dr. William H. Triplett, '11 

NURSING 

Mrs. E. Elizabeth R. Hipp, '29 
Mrs. Norma S. Long, '49 
Mrs. Elizabeth R. Singleton, '47 

PHARMACY 

Hyman Davidov, '20 
Samuel I. Raichlen, '25 
Frank J. Slama, '24 



EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS: 
Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 

President of the University 
David L. Brigham, '38 

Secretary-Treasurer 
Victor Holm, '57, Ass't Secretary 
Harry A. Boswell, Jr., '42, Past President 
Frank Block, '24, Past President 
Joseph H. Deckman, '31, Past President 
J. Gilbert Prendergast, '33, Past President 
J. Homer Remsberg, '18, Past President 
Col. O. H. Saunders, '10, Past President 
Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, '12 

Past President 
T. T. Speer, '17, Past President 
C. V. Koons, '29, Past President 
Dr. Arthur I. Bell, '19, Past President 

• 
ALUMNI CLUB REPRESENTATIVES: 
Baltimore — Mrs. Ethel M. Troy, '17 
Carroll County — 

Dr. Lawrence L. Leggett, '30 
Cecil County— Dr. Fred S. Fink, '56 
Cumberland — Reford Aldridge, '25 
Eastern Shore — Otis Twilley, '21 
Frederick County — 

James F. Zimmerman, '37 
"M" Club — George Knepley, '38 
Montgomery County — 

Robert W. Beall, '31 
New England — George Kerlejza, '25 
New York — Harold McGay, '50 
North Eastern Shore — 

Robert W. Dowries, Jr., '46 
Overseas— Col. Ralph I. Williams, '33, '41 
Pittsburgh — Dr. Joseph Finegold, '34 
Prince Georges County — 

Egbert F. Tingley, '27 
Richmond — Paul Mullinix, '36 
Schenectady — Mrs. Janice Mackey, '51 
Terrapin — James W. Stevens, '19 
U. S. Dcpl. of Agriculture — 

William H. Evans, '26 
Washington County — 

C. Scott Couchman, '51 



THE 




LUMNI DIARY 



THIS IS A PERIOD FOR REFLECTION, INVENTORY AND PREDICTION. MANY WHO 
are concerned with what the future holds would do well to review the past 
and to consider the present. There could be no more appropriate period for care- 
ful consideration than the present days. 

Close behind is Thanksgiving and remembered blessings of friends, family, 
home, church and opportunity. There must also be thoughts of the significance 
of our freedoms and an appreciation of the respective talents which we are per- 
mitted to exercise. Nor can we forget the sizeable measure of credit due the 
University of Maryland for its role in the development of the full potential of 
so many. 

Likewise, there is the certain knowledge that close ahead lies another Christmas 
Season with all that it implies in terms of good will, tolerance and understanding. 
At least temporarily many will set aside or discard frustrations, sacrifices and the 
suffering with which the full life is always tempered. The picture of a baby who 
could not walk or talk but who brought the inspiration of a new life will once 
again give men the courage to dare hope for peace on earth. 

Then there is always the New Year. We can think with great optimism of the 
unfolding of new horizons and discoveries; the realization of visions, dreams and 
ambitions. The past will be temporarily veiled in the fresh challenge of a new slate 
upon which another record will be placed. 

Undergirding the three peaks of holiday spirit in which we now find ourselves, 
is the great leveler of man's relationship to man. An old statement and a new 
have served to impress this factor upon the mind. The old — an admonition from 
a teacher to her students that, "Freedom must be taught again and again to each 
succeeding generation." The new — from a child who has managed to take a firm 
grip on my heart. Out of the blue she pulled this gem . . . "Mommie, when I was 
little, I thought Dad was so tall he could climb on a step ladder and touch the sky." 

It is difficult for those who have not had the experience to appreciate the 
inspiration of "standing tall" in the eyes of a child. By the same token, it is al- 
most impossible for a child to know how completely a parent's life is built around 
his desire for the happiness and success of his child. There will be succeeding 
generations to be taught. In all probability, we as alumni, and certainly those 
close to the University, know the ingredients for education and success. The 
good product includes the devotion and sacrifice of parents, the energy and 
effort of the student, the dedication and determination of the faculty, the interest 
and financial support of the taxpayer and the leadership and assistance of former 
students who have marked the proper trail as they walked the same educational 
pathway. 

Yes, life is an interesting package. It contains all for which an individual 
dreams, all that his loved ones hope for him and resources enough to meet the 
demands of the world. Perhaps through our interest and education, we may build 
the ladder that will make the touching of the sky a relatively simple matter. 
Each generation goes beyond that which preceded it but always intertwined are 
the trust of a child and the hope of a parent. Somehow, the combination of 
Thanksgiving, Christmas and the New Year emphasizes that something of yester- 
day gives certainty and hope for tomorrow. 

As ever, 




iPvt__^ 



David L. Brigham 
Alumni Secretary 



the Maryland Magazine 




UNIVERSITY CALENDAR OF ACTIVITIES 



DECEMBER 

1 Basketball — Penn State at College 
Park. 

3 Basketball — Virginia — Away. 
Swimming — N.C. State — Away. 

3 Omicron Delta Kappa Cotillion — 
College Park. 

6 Basketball — George Washington 
at College Park. 

6-10 U.T. Production — "I Am a Cam- 
era" — College Park. 

1 Swimming — Army at College Park. 
Basketball — Minnesota — Away. 

Wrestling— N.C. State at College 
Park. 

13 Basketball — Georgetown — Away. 

15 AWS Caroling and Christmas 
Pageant — College Park. 

16 Swimming — Clemson at College 
Park. 

17 Swimming — S. Carolina at College 
Park. 



Basketball — Wake Forest at Col- 
lege Park. 

19 Wrestling — Virginia at College 
Park. 

20 Christmas recess begins — College 
Park. 

28-31 Basketball — Dixie Classic at Ra- 
leigh, North Carolina. 

JANUARY 

3 Christmas recess ends — College 
Park. 

7 Swimming — Wake Forest at Col- 
lege Park. 

Basketball — S. Carolina at College 
Park. 

11 Basketball — Georgetown at Col- 
lege Park. 

13 Swimming — Washington & Lee — 
Away. 

14 Swimming — V.M.I. — Away. 
Basketball — Duke — Away. 



Wrestling— V.P.I, at College Park. 

16 Basketball— N. Carolina at Col- 
lege Park. 

1 8 Swimming — Navy at College Park. 
Basketball — Navy at College Park. 

1 9 National Symphony Concert — Col- 
lege Park. 

20 Inauguration Day. 

21 Basketball— N.C. State at College 
Park. 

Wrestling — Navy at College Park. 

25-27 Spring semester registration — Pen- 
tagon (tentative dates). 

26-31 Fall semester examinations — Col- 
lege Park. 



FEBRUARY 

2 Basketball — N. Carolina — Away. 

4 Basketball — Wake Forest — Away. 
Wrestling — Penn State — Away. 

6-10 Spring semester registration — Col- 
lege Park. 



Gives Away $350,000 

Mahlon N. Haines, '96, recently retired 
from his thriving shoe business in York, 
Pennsylvania. 

But Colonel Haines did more than re- 
tire: he gave away the entire business 
to his employees. He relinquished all 
financial interest in the business, staying 
on the company payroll as a consultant 
at $10,000 a year. 

The Haines Shoe Company and re- 
lated enterprises are valued at about 
$350,000. The 260 voting shares were 
divided between the six directors and 
officers of the firm. The 2,300 non- 

November-December, 1960 



voting shares, with an estimated book 
value of $137 each, were distributed to 
employees according to their length of 
service. 

Colonel Haines plans to spend the 
rest of his life writing and running his 
farms. He will write his autobiography 
and title it From the Cradle to the 
Grave: From Poverty to Riches. He 
also intends to do some newspaper writ- 
ing. Colonel Haines, who has been a 
leader in the Boy Scout movement for 
45 years, feels that he has always lived 
up to the Boy Scout oath by keeping 
"physically fit, mentally awake and 
morally straight." 





Mrs. Langert Receives Crusade for Freedom Award. 



Two Faculty Retire 

Two University faculty members retired 
this summer after 45 and 44 years of 
service. 

Lawrence J. Hodgins, Associate Pro- 
fessor of electrical engineering, joined 
the faculty in the fall of 1915 as an 
instructor in electrical engineering and 
physics. Hodgins, whose principal area 
of interest was machinery and power 
subjects, has served as faculty adviser 
to Tau Beta Pi, engineering honorary; 
Eta Kappa Nu, electrical engineering 
honorary, and the campus branch of 
American Institute of Electrical Engi- 
neers. 

Charles F. Kramer, Associate Profes- 
sor of Foreign Languages, joined the 
faculty in 1916 as instructor in lan- 
guages. While at Maryland he taught 
courses in French, German and Spanish. 
He has also served as instructor in 
French at George Washington Univer- 
sity and as special examiner for the 
U. S. Civil Service Commission. 



Sends Message for Freedom 

Mrs. Marlene Langert, '56, was named 
a winner in a national contest sponsored 
by the Crusade for Freedom in support 
of Radio Free Europe. The participants 
in the competition submitted personal 
messages which they wanted broadcast 
to people behind the Iron Curtain. 

The message Mrs. Langert will de- 
liver to more than 70 million people 
is: "As an American I believe that the 
most important thing people behind the 
Iron Curtain should know is that neither 
culture excels in everything. People 
must retain the good in their society, 
adopt the good in others, and respect 
the beliefs in all." 

Announcement of Mrs. Langert's 
selection was made at the White House 
by Mr. James M. Lambie, Jr., Special 
Assistant, and Mr. William J. Mc- 
Manus, Washington Chairman of the 
Crusade for Freedom (and Vice Presi- 
dent of the Chesapeake & Potomac 
Telephone Cos.). 

Mrs. Langert, a first generation 
American Citizen, entered the Radio 
Free Europe Truth Broadcast Program 
in the hopes that if she was fortunate 
enough to be chosen, she might be 
privileged to send her parents to Europe 
to broadcast a message to the people of 
Russia, telling them what America is 
really like . . . and what it had done 
for them and what the same way of life 
can do for others. Her parents, born in 
Russia, fled their homeland in the 



Ukraine in 1921 because of the threat 
of annihilation by the Pogrom (a mas- 
sacre of "enemies of the State"). 

Mrs. Langert is a psychologist in the 
Occupational Research Division of the 
United States Civil Service Commission. 



Fund Reaches $400,000 

The Greater University of Maryland 
Fund passed the $400,000 mark the first 
week of November. 

According to George Giavasis, Direc- 
tor of the Fund, "The recruiting of 
sponsors for the general canvass next 
spring is progressing very nicely. Al- 
ready we have the nucleus for sponsors 
committees in all parts of the country." 

"Several innovations have been put 
into effect this year that will increase 
the effectiveness of the Fund," contin- 
ued Mr. Giavasis. "First, we have cut 
down on the amount of paper work. 
This will be helpful to every sponsor 
and chairman. Secondly, every sponsor 
is a contributing sponsor. I am sure 
this second innovation will increase the 
interest and the willingness of Fund 
sponsors to go out and do a good job." 

Mr. Giavasis went on to mention 
that quotas would be established in the 
Fund regions as an impetus for greater 
giving through the Greater University 
of Maryland Fund. 



Awarded Fellowships 

John W. Dorsey, B.P.A '58, has been 
awarded a $3,000 graduate fellowship 
at Harvard University. Last year Dorsey 
had the highest academic average of his 
class, and also received an award as the 
senior with outstanding record in extra- 
curricular activities. Upon graduation 
he received a Rotary International fel- 
lowship and has been studying at the 
London School of Economics, England. 
David Ott, 33 E. Crescent Road, 
Greenbelt (Md.), has been awarded a 
$4,400 predoctoral fellowship at Brook- 
ings Institution for the next year. He 
will write his doctoral dissertation on 
the "Financial Development of Japan" 
while serving as a Brookings' fellow. 
(Continued on page 20) 



EUROPEAN 
ALUMNI TOUR 

July 1961 

The finishing touches have been 
A made to our four-week alumni 
charter trip to Europe in July, 1961. 
A full report and itinerary will be 
published in the next issue of The 
Maryland Magazine. But, if you 
can't wait for the exciting details, 
write to Vic Holm, Alumni Field 
Secretary, Alumni Office, University 
of Maryland, and he will send infor- 
mation about costs, itinerary and 
other pertinent information. 



the Maryland Magazine 



University Honors Convocation 
Recognizes Outstanding Achievement 




PRESIDENT ELKINS, ADDRESSING THE FIRST UNIVERSITY 
Honors Convocation, October 28, told 390 honor stu- 
dents, "The qualities of leadership which you have displayed 
deserve the support and encouragement of all who cherish 
a society which fosters individual initiative, rewards merit, 
respects the dignity of mankind, and recognizes the demands 
of this and future generations." 

The convocation, convened on the eve of Homecoming, 
was attended by more than 2,000 students, parents and faculty. 
Inaugurated for the purpose of recognizing outstanding 
achievement, the convocation also honored seven citizens, 
three of whom were alumni of the University, for furthering 
the ideals to which the University is dedicated. 

Recipients of Distinguished Service Awards were: 

Mrs. Elsie BigloW Barber, second woman to be 
elected to the Maryland House of Delegates (1923), civic 
leader and patroness of the health sciences. 

Mr. Jacob BlailStein, industrial and cultural leader, 
champion of human rights, philanthropist and consultant to 
the Federal government and the United Nations. Co-founder 
with his father of the American Oil Company, Mr. Blaustein 
is a member of the Board of Directors of the Standard Oil 
Company and is President of the Pan American Petroleum 
and Transport Company. 

Mr. Arthur Amory Houghton, Jr., corporation 

executive, art curator, music patron and educational states- 
man, is President of the Steuben Glass Company. He has also 
served as Curator of Rare Books at the Library of Congress, 
Trustee of the Institute of International Education, Trustee 



of the Cooper Union and Honorary Trustee at the Institute 
of Contemporary Art in Boston. 

Mr. MunrO Leaf, author, illustrator, 1927 graduate of 
the University of Maryland, and creator of the book, Ferdi- 
nand the Bull and of the long-standing series appearing in a 
national magazine, The Watchbird is Watching You. 

Mr. Edward Brooke Lee, soldier, statesman, civic 
leader and businessman, has served Maryland as State Comp- 
troller, Secretary of State, Speaker of the House of Delegates, 
member of the State Roads Commission and Vice Chairman 
of the Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Com- 
mission. 

Dr. Frank C. Marino, physician, surgeon, patron of 
the arts and education and 1916 graduate of the University 
of Maryland, School of Medicine. Dr. Marino is Superin- 
tendent of Baltimore's St. Joseph's Hospital and a member 
of the visiting staffs of eight other hospitals. He is a member 
of the Advisory Board of the College of Notre Dame and a 
member of the Association of Independent Colleges in Mary- 
land. 

Colonel O. H. Saunders, U. S. Army Retired, loyal 
alumnus, patriot and dedicated servant of his fellow man and 
career military leader. Col. Saunders was the first graduate 
of Maryland Agricultural College, forerunner of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland, to receive, upon graduation, an appoint- 
ment to the Army as a Second Lieutenant. He has served as 
President of a number of alumni groups, including the Uni- 
versity of Maryland Alumni Association. 



Mrs. Barber Mr. Blaustein 



Mr. Houghton Mr. Leaf 




the Maryland Magazine 



I 



N HIS ADDRESS TO THOSE ASSEMBLED, PRESIDENT El KINS 

said, "Times are changing, and while we cannot he proud we 
can be thankful that an outside force has awakened the public 
— adult and student — to the well known but often ignored 
truth that the welfare of a country depends upon the relatively 
few who are creative, imaginative, ambitious, and industrious." 

"Indeed," he continued, "it is encouraging that the people 
of this country are beginning to recognize individual achieve- 
ment and intellectual leadership. We have been quick to 
reward champions in many fields of physical endeavor, to 
crown beauty queens and idolize entertainers, but seldom has 
intellectual capacity and application been properly recognized. 
Too often we have left unhonored the men and women whose 
intellect have provided the ideas upon which progress and 
even preservation depends. Too often, in our schools and 
colleges, the average has been the goal, and even the object 
of admiration and emulation. We, the parents and teachers, 
have not challenged the brilliant mind and, quite naturally, 
youth has not responded to the call for excellence. 

"I address my remarks this evening," pointed out President 
Elkins, "particularly to the students whose performance we 
proclaim. . . . This new generation, sometimes called the 
'generation without a cause', is worthy of our attention and 
our pride. They are being called upon with urgency to fulfill 
the promise of the individual, and I am convinced that they 
will be better prepared than any previous generation to cope 
with the complexities of a new era. 

"The human being," he stated, "is endowed with amazing 
resources; but few, if any, individuals are able to attain dis- 
tinction without perseverance and hard work. There are a 
few who have extraordinary capacity — even genius — and 




Following formal ceremonies, individual certificates 
"for distinguished scholarship" were presented i<> rtudent 

recipients. Dr. Frederic I. Maris, Dean of the Colli ■■< 

of Engineering, is shown t<> the right. 



while they may advance faster and go further, they cannot 
do so without effort and. often, a certain amount of drudgery. 
The 'gates of excellence' are reached only by those who are 
determined to apply their abilities to the fullest extent; and 
I am sure that those of you who are honored this evening 
can attest, at least partially, that the road to recognition is 
rugged and steep. It is not closed, however, to those who 
would travel it." 

President Elkins continued by speaking of leadership and 
its place in a democracy. "Leadership of all kinds in a democ- 
racy is a hard test of intelligence, fortitude, durability, appli- 
cation and common sense. 

"Leadership requires good men," he went on, "it also re- 
quires men of vision. ... It has been said that without vision 
men perish, for they may be destroyed by the secrets they 



Mr. Lee Dr. Marino 



Col. Saunders 




November-December, 1960 



unlock and the forces they create. Today, the knowledge of 
our universe far exceeds the understanding of the people, and 
there is every indication that a feeling of helpless bewilderment 
ma) develop in the future, if indeed it has not already hap- 
pened. This imposes an awesome responsibility of leadership 
the responsibility of communicating ideas and knowledge 
to the masses so that they may act intelligently. 

"Fortunately, there is a large potential source of leader- 
ship." he declared. "Ability is important but diligent applica- 
tion is the moving force. The individuals who have made the 
most ot their lives have done so. not so much because of 
superior ability, but because of diligent application. They have 
succeeded because they have imposed upon themselves a disci- 
pline of order and productive habits. They have learned to 
distinguish between primary and secondary matters, and they 
have moved toward a clearly defined goal. They have found 
the road rugged at first but by perseverance and intelligent 
planning they have laid a base upon which to build. The 
distant horizons of useful achievement have become clearer 
and clearer to them with every step, until at last they have 
attained their objective." 

"The strongest force in the world today," continued Presi- 
dent Elkins, "is the movement of the people for recognition, 
for opportunity of the individual to share the benefits of civi- 
lized society. In parts of the world best known to us, there 
has been remarkable progress; but in other parts, where two- 
thirds of earth's population dwell, there is a turbulence, dis- 
content, and yearning which, in time, may produce stupendous 
changes. The developments of these areas will have a power- 
ful impact upon the future of civilization and will affect the 
lives of peoples everywhere. As we thank God that enlight- 



ened leadership has given us a government under which the 
individual can develop his potentialities to an unprecedented 
extent, we should not forget that millions of less privileged 
are groping for a better life; and, although they may reject 
guidance and help, they will be influenced by our example. 

"Tonight, we are assembled to honor individual achieve- 
ment. We acknowledge ability but we pay special tribute to 
application and a sense of responsibility in a free society. In 
so doing, we recognize the inspiration and sacrifice of parents, 
relatives and friends. We accent importance of leadership in 
a free society which demands a full measure of that 'noblest 
attribute of man — an educated mind guided and directed by 
virtue.' 

"Congratulations, and may your talents and vision lead you 
on to greater achievements," concluded President Elkins. 

Following the presentation of the seven outstanding citizens 
awards, the deans of the individual colleges read the names 
of the students in their college receiving a 3.5 or better aver- 
age for the last semester. Each student stood up as his name 
was called. 

The Chapel Choir which won critical acclaim at the Fest- 
tival Casals in Puerto Rico last summer added a distinguished 
note to the occasion. After the invocation by Reverend Theo- 
dore Casper, Lutheran chaplain, the choir sang the "Battle 
Hymn of the Republic." "Celestial of Voices" and the "Seven- 
Fold Amen" were also presented by the choir. 

Reverend J. R. Huffines, Methodist chaplain, gave the 
benediction. Refreshments were served following the convo- 
cation and members of the audience were given a chance to 
meet the members of the Board of Regents, President Elkins, 
and the honored guests. 



each dean announced the names of honor students within his college. Dr. Leon 
Smith, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, left, standing on the platform, is 

shown reading the Arts and Sciences honor roll. 




Alumni Attend a 
Winning Homecoming 









top left: Tommy Brown, Maryland halfback, 
leaps high to snag key pass in first quarter. 
top right: Post-game alumni reception in the 
Student Union Lounge, middle right: Distin- 
guished alumni take their place in the pre-game 
pageant of floats, bottom left: Winning 
House Decoration, bottom right: President 
Elkins congratulates Lina Grant, I960 Home- 
coming Queen. 




10 




The 37th annual homecoming found thousands of 
alumni returning to the University for reunions with old 
friends and familiar places. 

The morning activities consisted of tours around the campus, 
an organ recital in the Memorial Chapel, and a drive around 
to the women's residences and sorority houses to see the house 
decorations. The theme for the decorations and the parade 
of floats was "Maryland Swings." Both the house decorations 
and the floats were decorated to depict individual popular 
songs. 

Dave Brigham, Director of the Office of Alumni Relations, 
greeted approximately 300 guests attending the pre-game 
alumni luncheon in the Dining Hall. The luncheon, consisting 
of fried chicken, tossed salad, rolls, assorted cookies and 
brownies, and a choice of beverages, was attended by many 
of the University's administrative family. On hand to meet 
the returning grads were President Elkins, Miss Adele Stamp, 
retiring Dean of Women, B. James Borreson, Executive Dean 
for Student Life, and Geary Eppley, Dean of Men. 

Pre-game festivities included a parade of floats. The crowd 
saw representations of "The Syncopated Clock," "From This 
Moment On," the "Untouchables," and "What'd I Say" plus 
many others. The crowd-pleaser and eventual winner was 
"The Purple People Eater," the entry of Phi Kappa Sigma, 
social fraternity. 

Not to be left out, the Terrapin Club had an entry in the 
parade of floats entitled "Running Like Wild Fire." Four 
alums rode in a Model T with a sign reading "Welcome Back 
Maryland Alums." 

Several minutes before game time, Marylanders raised 
their voices to greet the announcement of Lina Grant as the 
1960 Homecoming Queen. Miss Grant, a junior, was selected 
in an election held by the student body. 

Coach Tom Nugent's football team was the single item that 
assured the success of this year's Homecoming. Winning 
handily, 15-0, over the Gamecocks of South Carolina, the 
spirits of students and alums could not be quenched. 

Quarterbacking the team was Dale Betty, everybody's 
choice for a mention on post-season Ail-American teams. 
Maryland won the toss, elected to receive and returned the 
kick-off to Maryland's 33-yard line. Three attempts to move 
the ball found Gary Collins punting on the last down. 

South Carolina made two attempts to carry the ball and 
punted out on the third down. Dale Betty handed off to Rex 
Collins, passed to Tom Brown, passed to Gary Collins and 
then handed off to Rex Collins, to score for the first time. 
Richie Novak came in at quarterback and passed to Gary 
Collins for the extra two points after touchdown. Maryland-8, 
South Carolina-0. 

In the third quarter, Maryland scored again on a pass from 
Betty to Hank Poniatowski. Novak held and Hannigan's con- 
version was good. Maryland was ahead 15-0 and held this 
edge until the final whistle. 

After the game, many alumni attended the alumni reception 
held in the lounge of the Student Union. Guest of honor at 
the reception was Dean Adele Stamp, retiring after nearly 
four decades as Dean of Women. 

Homecoming ended on a joyful note at the annual Home- 
coming dance which featured Ray Charles and Bob Harry 
and their orchestras; Miss Lina Grant, Homecoming Queen, 
reigned supreme. 



11 




wiovi : Hundreds of idnmiu greeted Homecoming Guest oj //."/.■/ 

Dam Adele Stamp, retiring this year us Dean of h omen. 
below: Students watch an ace move mysteriously from behind the 

king to make a royal flush. In second photograph, a Tri-Delt looks 
behind the scene to discover the acc-movm^ apparatus. 




r*V I 




E 



ach year, 




Christmas come; 



i 

In wheelchairs, heads swathed in bandages, 



legs tightly encased in 



splints, they listen 



to seasonal carols. 




12 



expressing the joy and hope of the season] 




of evergreens brought indooij 



children at University Hospital. 




Christmas, a time of tinsel, gift-giving and the odor 



above all, a time of great wonder. 




13 




Governor Hicks 



By Dr. Verne E. Chatelain 

united, they could preserve the Union, and at the same time 
have their rights respected and recognized. It is because the 
Southern States have acted with so much jealousy and distrust 
toward each other, that the North has been able to encroach 
upon their rights and war upon their institutions. // / desired 
a dissolution of the Union, and wished to effect it, nothing 
would please me more than the refusal of the slave-holding 
States to meet in Convention; for then the North will continue 
its aggressions, and some of the slave-holding States, goaded 
to madness, will secede." 

Governor Hicks, upon whose political ambitions and abili- 
ties at this moment of crisis a great deal depended, was a 
colorful and uncertain factor in Maryland public life in his 
day. Born on the Eastern Shore and the product of routine 
machine politics, he had seized, with dramatic flair and flour- 
ish, upon the "Know Nothing" movement, at the point of its 
great popularity in the State, as a convenient vehicle to sweep 
him into the governorship. In 1860 "Know Nothingism" was 
in ebb-tide and in danger of disappearing with the same rapid- 
ity that had marked its initial rise; and Hicks, with his cus- 
tomary acumen, was already in the process of seeking other 
more productive fields of endeavor. The problem for him at 



When the Civil War came to Marylam 



A N OFFICIAL LETTER, OF FEBRUARY 3, 1860, FROM WILLIAM 

A\ H. Gist, Governor of the State of South Carolina to 
Governor Thomas Holliday Hicks of the Old Line State, 
because of the fateful chain of circumstances which it pro- 
duced, assumes today a place of far-reaching importance in 
the relationship of Maryland to the Civil War. Governor Gist, 
in this communication, proposed that Hicks join immediately 
with his neighbors to the south in a "convention" for the 
purpose of demonstrating Southern solidarity as well as to find 
ways and means to deal with growing Northern pressures. 1 

Governor Gist was himself the offspring of an old Maryland 
family, and he had as many close relatives in the Chesapeake 
Bay area as in South Carolina. He felt, therefore, that he 
knew very well the attitude in Maryland respecting the South- 
ern position and he was confident that, in any issue involving 
North and South, he could without doubt count on Maryland 
support. That State, as a matter of record, had repeatedly, in 
its official pronouncements and actions, upheld a strong states' 
rights line; it was, moreover, one of the original slave com- 
munities and recently had vigorously asserted the inherent 
right of the slave-owner to go into Northern states and terri- 
tories, if need be, to reclaim runaway negroes under the pro- 
visions of the Federal fugitive slave laws. Maryland had, in 
brief, shown itself overwhelmingly Southern in its policies and 
in its sympathies — at least insofar as the record was concerned 
to this point of history. 

The South Carolina proposal for a "convention of Southern 
States" was, according to Gist, the proper way to make certain 
that secession would never be necessary and would never 
occur; to confront the Northern abolitionists with such a show 
of Southern solidarity, determination, and strength would 
serve to stop even the most impetuous of the opposition. 
Thus, to Hicks, the Governor wrote: ". . . never for a 
moment have I desired a dissolution of the Union, if our 
rights . . . are respected and our equality recognized. And I 
solemnly believe the very best way to preserve the Union is, 
for the Southern States to meet and insist upon their rights, 
and to act in concert in defending them. If the South were 



this juncture was to anticipate, if possible, how the political 
winds would veer, and, especially, to decide what was likely to 
happen, both in National and State politics in that critical 
year. In short, Thomas Holliday Hicks was a political oppor- 
tunist of the first water and there were dark storm clouds 
gathering, which his shrewd native instincts told him must not 
be ignored. Still, it was much too early in the month of Febru- 
ary, I860, for anyone to predict with certainty the course, or 
the pattern. So, in the circumstances, the logical thing was to 
stall for time; and it was this policy that the Governor pro- 
ceeded to follow. With a polite and non-committal note to 
Gist and with protestations of his deep affection for the South 
Carolinian as a friend and leader of Southern ideology, the 
Maryland Governor turned the proposal for the Convention 
over to the General Assembly, but in such a fashion as to 
make sure that there would be no immediate action. 



A= 



S IT HAPPENED, BOTH HICKS AND THE LEADERS OF THE 

legislative body were reluctant to adopt the bold and defiant 
measures, which the call of Governor Gist for a convention 
of Southern states would have produced. Two resolutions of 
the Assembly, 2 passed after due deliberation, fully disclose 
the attitude of the Maryland government in this regard. The 
second reads as follows: ". . . we deem it inexpedient to call 
a Southern convention in the present excited condition of the 
country, relying upon the belief that the recent outrages 
against the South have already awakened the patriotism and 
justice of the majority of our Northern brethren, but should 
this fond hope result in a shameless failure, our earnest pro- 
test be disregarded, and the disruption of these States be 
rendered inevitable, that Maryland will then be prepared to 
meet her sister States of the South in a Southern Convention 
for the protection of Southern rights." 

It will be observed that the wording of this statement quite 
carefully glossed over Gist's argument, that the way to pre- 
vent "the disruption of these States" was to confront the North 






14 



the Maryland Magazine 



with a show of strength, such as the early holding of a 
convention would produce. 

Meanwhile, in the words of the first resolution, the people 
of the Old Line State were "willing to exhaust all reasonable 
means to convince our Northern adversaries that a mutual 
interest and a mutual patriotism, and a common destiny shall 
bind us together as brethren, rather than sever us as toes." 
This document, like the second, promised the State of South 
Carolina "that should the hour arrive when the Union must 
be dissolved, Maryland will cast her lot with her sister States 
of the South. . . ." 

Whatever may be read into the two resolutions, prepared in 
reply to the South Carolina demand for an early convention 
of the Southern states (and it is clear that, at this point, 
Maryland's sympathies were all in the direction of the South ) , 
still, it is quite evident that neither the Governor nor the 
Assembly were yet ready to jump off the deep end; and all 
were agreed that measures for conciliating the North were still 
in order and were more likely to be productive than a bolder 
and more threatening line of action. More significant, indeed, 
was the fact that the first step had been taken to remove the 
State from the front line of the opposition to a more pro- 
tected, if not actually neutral, position. Unfortunately, Gist, 
who was deeply disappointed in this reaction to his proposal 
— which, it may be added, served to delay for the time being 
the holding of the suggested convention — failed to read the 
friendly note of caution inherent in the Maryland action and 
went heedlessly on to the fateful step of secession later in 
that same year. 

At this juncture it is logical, perhaps, to look more closely 
into the complex pattern of conditions that had caused the 
Old Line State to pause and to take careful stock of all of the 
pros and cons in the great controversy that was raging, and 
that, very soon, would unloose the guns of war. While the 
personal position of Governor Hicks, already mentioned, was 
undoubtedly a factor (we find him before the end of his term, 
in 1861, giving substantial, even if somewhat grudging, assist- 
ance to the new administration of President Lincoln), there 
were other and much more fundamental considerations that, 
in the long run, prevented Maryland from making the fatal 
blunder of secession, despite the fact that this course did not 
prevent by any means many of the ghastly vicissitudes of the 
struggle from engulfing its inhabitants. 

Being one of the first communities in the United States to 
develop Negro slavery, Maryland's ideological inclinations, as 
we have seen, notwithstanding the attitude of some segments 
of its population, such as the Germans, were predominantly 
Southern. Then, too, trade and commerce with its neighbors 
to the South, even though it had important economic ties with 
the West and overseas, tended to increase its sympathies for 
the slave states — and all the more so in view of the peculiari- 
ties of its political system, which preserved to the traditional 
agrarian and "country" aristocracy the control of the State. 
This group, it should be noted, was established mainly on the 
Eastern Shore and in the lower counties on the Western 
Shore, where the tidewater plantation and slavery life had 
always been dominant. 



0, 



FFSETTING THESE STRONGLY PRO-SOUTHERN INFLUENCES, 

however, were other factors and conditions that operated 
greatly to confuse the issues, even if they did not make for a 
pro-Northern sentiment. Maryland had become, during the 
first half of the nineteenth century, a very important indus- 
trial and financial area. Specifically, there was Baltimore, the 
third largest city in the Nation by 1860, and one of the chief, 

November-December, 1960 



it not the greatest ol .ill ol the Atl. nine pon communities 
serving the tuns Appalachian west, .is well as numerous foi 
eign centers oi trade. Baltimore's massive business inter 
involving trade goods ol nearly ever) variety, its numerous 

transportation lines, ami its insurance Companies, ami ban' 
and jobbing houses, could not be ignored by the still pohti 

callj dominant agrarian aristocracy, even ii there was any 

disposition to do so ami there was not. \\ bethel some ol the 

older categories ol the Tidewater population liked it oi not 
these industrial ami business interests were now formidable, 
ami those representing them were thoroughly established 

together with their outlook and thinking, which was distinctly 
national and international, rather than sectional and Southern 

Again, and often overlooked in assessing Maryland's rela 
tionship to the War. was its immediate proximity to the 
Federal city of Washington. II the Northern leadership could 
ill afford the loss of a key stale, like Virginia, the possible 
defalcation of Maryland, which controlled the Potomac n\er 
valley and the principal artery for the How ot troops and sup- 
plies to and from the area north of the Ohio river and the 
Nation's capital, could not be tolerated at all. I he many 
important steps taken to protect the Baltimore and Ohio 
railroad, a Maryland institution, the effective operation of 
which was always a matter of prime necessity to the Federal 
government, is ample evidence of this truth. Likewise, the 
retention of the State itself, within the embrace of the Federal 
Union, was an absolute necessity for the Lincoln administra- 
tion; and this fact serves to explain, at least in part, why 
Maryland, although not a secessionist State, was dealt with 
even more harshly and summarily at times than most of the 
avowed "secesh" recalcitrants farther south. 

Such measures, to be sure, did not prevent many Mary- 
landers from serving in the Confederate armies, nor did they 
appear to have much effect upon the shipping of strategic 
supplies to the enemy, nor upon the far-flung operation of 
espionage activities in behalf of the Richmond government of 
Jeff Davis. They did, nevertheless, serve to put an end. once 
and for all, to efforts to align the State formally with the 
South; and they led to a reign of military occupation and 
terrorization of the population, as well as a loss of self- 
government and property to a considerable degree — including, 
finally, the confiscation without compensation 3 and the freeing 
of all of the slaves in Marvland. 



NOTES 

1 It is perhaps worth noting, in connection with Governor Gist's 
letter of February, 1860, that, had Maryland complied promptly 
with the request of South Carolina for an immediate "Convention 
of the Southern States." that step would have meant, in all proba- 
bility, not only a public, but also an irrevocable association with 
the most extreme policies of the South, including, in the light of 
historical developments in that year, eventually even secession 
itself, Gist's assertions to the contrary notwithstanding. 

Maryland's qualified and cautious reply to the South Carolina 
Governor, as it turned out. is also significant in view of the fact 
that, with the rejection of this one good opportunity to take a bold 
course in behalf of the South — one which would have put Mary- 
land on the Southern side in the War without much doubt — no 
equally clear opportunity was ever again presented to move in 
similar fashion. What no one fully appreciated at this moment was 
that Maryland, intentionally or not, had already closed the door to 
its Southern neighbors. 

2 The incomplete texts of both resolutions of the Maryland 
Assembly, in answer to Governor Gist, can be found in M. P. 
Andrews. History of Maryland, 503-4; likewise, a portion of the 
letter of Gist to Hicks. 

3 As late as the year. 1867. some of the Maryland counties 
— for example, Charles — were making inventories of all erstwhile 
slaves as a basis for indemnification by the Federal government to 
property owners. These efforts, of course, proved to be futile. The 
Maryland Room in the Library of the University of Mai viand has 
a manuscript copy of the Charles County inventory 



15 




Do You Remember? 



c 



AN YOU FIND YOURSELF IN THIS PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN AT 

the "Queen's Game" played at College Park on October 19, 
1957? 

This photograph was one of a series of pictures made at 
the game by Al Danegger, Head of the Photographic Section 
of the University. The photographs are a part of an historical 
picture file on the University and the State of Maryland housed 
in the Maryland & Rare Books Department of McKeldin 
Library. 

Besides the photographs on the "Queen's Game" the 
Department has copies of some of the Baltimore and Wash- 
ington newspapers published that day. A film, made at the 
time, is also available on campus, and can be obtained through 



the Film Distribution Section, Room 127, Administration 
Building, University of Maryland, College Park. 

The Library needs other materials of all kinds to complete 
its collection of archives of the University and the State of 
Maryland. Will anyone having items which might be added 
to the collection, or of which copies could be made for this 
purpose, please contact Howard Rovelstad, Director of 
Libraries, McKeldin Library, University of Maryland, College 
Park, Md. (WA 7-3800, x341), or get in touch with Mrs. 
Harold Hayes, Librarian, Maryland & Rare Books Depart- 
ment, McKeldin Library, University of Maryland, College 
Park, Md. (WA 7-3800, x666) — or just mail the materials 
direct to either Mr. Rovelstad or Mrs. Hayes. 



16 



the Maryland Magazine 



Maryland Books and Authors 

Edited by Mrs. Harold Hayes, Head, Maryland and Rare Books Department 



Johnson, Warren R. THE SCIENCE 
AND MEDICINE OF EXERCISE 
AND SPORTS. New York: Harper 
& Bros., 1960. 725 pp. $12.00. 




Edited by WARREN R. JOHNSON 



SCIENCE AND MEDICINE 
OF EXERCISE 
AND SPORTS 



Ths first technical symposium in tho field, 
by forty-two too authorities In physiology, 
physical education, psychotocy. and owdlckM. 



D, 



'R. JOHNSON, WHO IS BOTH THE 

editor and a contributing author to this 
symposium, has brought together the 
efforts of 42 outstanding researchers in 
physiology, physical education, psychol- 
ogy, and medicine, and has presented 
the most comprehensive publication to 
date dealing with the research and 
knowledge of exercise. It is the first 
such publication to draw on the re- 



searches from all disciplines. To those 
in the professional fields of health, 
physical education, and recreation, this 
publication is a landmark in identifying 
and establishing the scientific body of 
knowledge which undergirds them. This 
publication, reflecting as it does an in- 
creased emphasis and growing body of 
literature on exercise and its effects, 
affords the means to greater breadth 
and depth of study for those preparing 
to enter these fields of study. The 36 
chapters of the text are organized into 
six broad areas of exercise and sports 
research including the ( 1 ) structural 
and mechanical, (2) physiological, (3) 
maturing and aging, (4) psychological, 
(5) cultural and historical, and (6) 
therapeutic. The wide range of specific 
chapter topics cover such diverse sub- 
jects as the effect of exercise on growth, 
academic achievement, weight control, 
and length of life. The book has been 
written for the practitioner in the field 
with each chapter offering a clearly 
written analysis and interpretation of 
the scientific knowledge available. Of 
particular value to the researcher is the 
thorough review of scientific literature 
which sharply reveals the extent of 
knowledge and points up new directions 
for future research. 

Some of the contributors are: Ernest 
Gellhorn, Professor of Neurophysiology. 
University of Minnesota; David B. Dill, 
Deputy Director for Scientific Activities 
and Directorate of Medical Research. 
U. S. Army Chemical Warfare Center, 
Maryland, and formerly Director of the 
Harvard Fatigue Laboratory; Dr. Lucien 




Dr. Johnson 

Brouha, world-famous physiologist; and 
Emma McCloy Layman, Chief Psychol- 
ogist, Department of Psychiatry. Chil- 
dren's Hospital. Washington. D. C. 

Dr. Johnson is Professor and Head 
of Health Education and Physical Edu- 
cation; College of Physical Education: 
Recreation and Health: Universin oi 
Maryland; College Park. 

Reviewed by Dr. Wn i i\m Creswi i i : 
Consultant in Health Em i \ 
tion; the American Asso* iation 
for HEALTH-Pinsu \i I Hi i \ t ion- 
Recreation. 



November-December, I960 



17 



UNIVERSITY SPORTS 



By JOE BLAIR Sports Editor 



Basketball Preview 



M 



.ARYLAND WILL BE WITHOUT FIVE 

boys from last year's team. They will 
have six lettermen returning, with Bob 
McDonald, 6-7 forward who played 
only up until Christmas last year. 

The five lost through graduation were 
Al Bunge, 6-9 center, an All-Confer- 
ence and honorable mention All-Ameri- 
can selection. Al also was the first draft 
choice of the Warriors. Others lost were 
Jerry Bechtle, a starter for three years, 
Pete Krukar, an in and out starter, and 
Jerry Shanahan. 

Another boy, Charles McNeil who 
also just played until Christmas was a 
senior and will not be back. 

Returning lettermen along with Mc- 
Donald will be Paul Jelus, 6-2; Bruce 
Kelleher, 6-2; Bob Wilson, 6-10; Ted 
Marshall, 6-7; and Mike Nofsinger, 5-9. 



The two boys to watch, of course, are 
Jelus and Kelleher. We also have a high 
concern for Wilson because of his size 
and hope he can come through with a 
big year for us. We need his height; and 
of course it will help to have McDonald 
available. 

It was Jelus and Kelleher who broke 
into the starting line-up last season when 
McNeil and McDonald became ineligi- 
ble, and they turned out to be a pair 
of magnificent performers. Kelleher is 
a fine outside guard and play maker 
with a brilliant jumper and a fine set. 
Jelus, although guard size, had to be 
played inside and did a great job. He 
had a fine jump shot and set from the 
outside, but his drive and under-hand 
under the basket shots and lay-ups are 
a thing to see. He made quite an im- 



pressive impression we might say. His 
strength is abetted by his aggressiveness. 
He is a real tough one on the boards. He 
is a fine scorer. 

McDonald is a fine scorer and his 
height on rebounds will be a big assist 
to Coach Millikan. 

In Jerry Greenspan, along with Bob 
Eicher and Bill Stasiulatis, the Terps 
have an outstanding trio of newcomers. 
They are aided by some other pretty 
fair boys in George Hodor, Connie Car- 
penter, Tom Brown, and Joe Barton. 
Eicher is a real slick boy, outstanding 
floor man and play maker with a real 
accurate jumper, one-hand push, and a 
terrific drive for lay-ups. He has blind- 
ing speed which makes him dangerous. 
In Stasiulatis, we have one of the finest 
all-round boys in a long time. 




M-Club Basketball 



k_J PONSORSHIP OF THE REGULARLY- 

scheduled National Basketball Associa- 
tion game between the Philadelphia 
Warriors and the Detroit Pistons at Cole 
Field House on Tuesday night, Decem- 
ber 13, marks another milestone in the 
history of the M Club of the University 
of Maryland. 

The appearance of such fabulous fig- 
ures as Gene Shue, '54, regarded as the 
greatest player ever developed at Mary- 
land, with the Detroit Pistons, and Wilt 

Gene Shue 



(The Stilt) Chamberlain, of the Phila- 
delphia Warriors, promises to attract a 
large crowd to the M Club promotion, 
staged to benefit its Scholarship Fund. 
Much credit is due to George W. 
Knepley, former Maryland three-letter 
man in football, basketball, baseball, for 
making it possible for the scholarships 
to be awarded. Knepley's foresight and 
that of his hard-hitting, hard-working 
committees has enabled the M Club to 
make available many important schol- 
arships as a result of such events as 

(Continued on next page) 



18 



the Maryland Magazine 



the East-West College All-Star basket- 
ball game, the Jack Kramer professional 
tennis matches, and last February's sell- 
out Boston Celtics-Minneapolis Lakers 
basketball game. All were staged in Cole 
Field House and all were highly suc- 
cessful. 

Playing leading roles along with 
Knepley are such former Marylanders 
as Hotsy Alperstein, former President; 
Ken Maskell, President; Charles Beebe, 
First Vice President; Joe Deckman, 
Treasurer; Jim Kehoe, Secretary; Harvey 
Simms, Jay Phillips, members of the 
Board of Governors, and George Weber. 

Preceding the Scholarship game, the 
M Club will stage its annual banquet 
at the Hotel Statler on December 3 at 
which time awards will be made to 
men outstanding in various fields. 

Tickets for the Scholarship Game are 
priced at $2.00 and $3.00. Mail orders, 
accompanied by an additional handling 
charge of 25 cents, will be accepted at 
Box 295, College Park, Maryland. All 
checks should be made payable to the 
M Club. 




ALUMNI CHRISTMAS GIFT 

To aid its scholarship fund, the M Club 
is this year presenting for sale a black 
glass ashtray carrying the legend, "The 
University of Maryland" and the large 
initial "M" in gold. The tray sells for $1 
and includes a sturdy mailing carton. Size 
of the tray is about five inches square. Mail 
orders should be addressed to M Club, Inc., 
Box 273, College Park Post Office, College 
Park, Maryland. Checks should be made 
payable to the M Club. 



Golf becomes Big Sport 
at University of Maryland 



G, 



01 I HAS BEEN CATCHING ON IN A 

big way at the University of Maryland. 

Since the University opened its own 
golf course for play, alumni alone have 
played close to 7,000 rounds. Their 
most recent tournament was sponsored 
by the M Club early this fall. With 237 
participants, representing 50 colleges 
and universities, M Club members and 
guests enjoyed a day of golf, socializing 
and feasting. Robinson Lappin, Con- 
sultant, Food Services and Planning De- 
partment, was in charge of the banquet, 
which was catered by Emanuel F. 
Zalesak, '25. 

In the golf tournament, players were 
divided into three categories: members, 
associate members, and guests. Winners 
among the members included: Milton 
Vandenbeig, Low Gross (72); Bucky 
Miller, 2nd Low Gross (76); Chet 
Veebe, Low Net (63) ; and Roger Coon- 
rod, 2nd Low Net (70). Among the 
associate members, winners were: Pat 
Haver, Low Gross (76); Neil Ryan, 
2nd Low Gross (77); Max Ryan, Low 
Net (70); and J. Harvey, 2nd Low Net 
(71). Guest winners were: Dave Wort- 
man, Low Gross (71); Eddy Johnston, 
2nd Low Gross (73); Tex Carpenter, 
Low Net (69); and Tom Zink, 2nd Low 
Net (70). 

One student has been making inter- 
national headlines with his champion- 
ship game — he's Deane Beman, of Sil- 
ver Spring. Deane first attracted world- 
wide attention by winning the British 
Amateur Championship in 1959. And 
then to prove it wasn't a lucky break, 
he demonstrated his ability again this 
year, becoming the National Amateur 
Champion. Playing in St. Louis, at the 
St. Louis Country Club, Deane played 
a five-under-par final round, beating Bob 
Gardner for top honors. In the 160 
holes he played, Deane shot seven un- 
der par. He also won the champion's 
title in the Trans-Mississippi and East- 
ern Amateur matches. Deane was a 
member of the American team which 
won the World Amateur Championship 
October 1 at Ardmore, Pennsylvania. 
He was second low scorer with 282. 




Deane Beman 



Now the faculty and staff members 
are participating in organized play. This 
fall two new teams took to the links in 
competition matches for the University: 
they are the men's and women's teams, 
chosen from the golf players found in 
the ranks of the faculty and the stall. 
Mrs. Reda Decker is heading up the 
ladies' group and, in their first inter-club 
match at the Prince Georges Country 
Club, Reda took the prize for low net 
score. Robinson Lappin is chairman of 
the men's team. 

Inter-team competition will get under- 
way in earnest next spring. Matches will 
be held with other schools, government 
agencies, and country clubs. 



November-December, 1960 



19 




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Campus Notes 

Continued from page 4 



Publisher Marks Success 

Talbot T. Speer, Ag. '17, recently cele- 
brated his 35th year as publisher of the 
Maryland Gazette and the Evening Cap- 
ital, Southern Maryland's leading news- 
papers. 

A reputation as a fighter, earned dur- 
ing the first World War, has stayed with 
him all his life. Mr. Speer had to fight 
to keep the two newspapers going when 
he first took them over in 1925. He 
built them up until now the newspaper 
firm is one of Anne Arundel County's 
largest manufacturing concerns. 

Mr. Speer has also found time to serve 
as a Director of the Union Trust Com- 
pany of Maryland and to hold important 
posts in Maryland government. He is 
well known in University of Maryland 
alumni circles and served as President 
of the Alumni Association for two 
terms, 1950-52. 



Portrait Unveiled 

A portrait of Dr. Charles O. Appleman, 
former Dean of the Graduate School, 
was accepted by University President 
Wilson H. Elkins during a brief cere- 
mony recently. 

The presentation was made by Dr. 
Ronald Bamford, present Dean of the 
Graduate School, in the name of Dean 
Appleman's colleagues and former stu- 
dents. The portrait is the work of Col- 
onel James P. Wharton, Head of the 
Department of Art. 

In accepting the portrait, President 
Elkins pointed out the great contribu- 
tions made by Dean Appleman in the 
course of his long and meritorious 
service for the University. In 1918 he 
was asked to organize the Maryland 
Graduate School and was its dean from 
1918 until his retirement in 1949. 

Dr. Appleman is a member of many 
honorary, professional, and learned 
societies and organizations. He was the 
fourth person to receive the Charles 
Reid Barnes Life Membership Award 
from the American Society of Plant 
Physiologists. His outstanding perform- 
ances as teacher, researcher, and ad- 
ministrator have found recognition in 
the presentation of the portrait. 



College of 
AGRICULTURE 

A. B. Hamilton 

Keeney Receives Borden Award 

Dr. Mark Keeney, Professor, Dairy De- 
partment, has been named winner of the 
Annual Borden Award for outstanding 
research contributions in the field of 
dairy manufacturing for 1960. The 
presentation was made to Dr. Keeney at 
the Annual Meeting of the American 
Dairy Science Association held at Utah 
State University, Logan, Utah. The 
award consisted of a gold medal and 
$1,000. 

This national honor came to Dr. 
Keeney in recognition of outstanding 
research in the chemistry of milk and 
other dairy products. Dr. Keeney is the 
originator of a method for identifying 
butterfat by a chromatographic analysis 
of the butyric acid content of fat. This 
method for determining butyric acid in 
fat was adopted as the official method of 
the Association of Official Agricultural 
Chemists, and is useful in detecting the 
adulteration of dairy products with 
other fats. 

Dr. Keeney received his Bachelor of 
Science and Ph.D. degrees from Penn- 
sylvania State University, and his Mas- 
ter of Science Degree from Ohio State 
University. He joined the faculty of the 
College of Agriculture, University of 
Maryland, in 1950. His professional 
activities include membership in the 
American Chemical Society; American 
Dairy Science Association; American 
Association for the Advancement of Sci- 
ence; and the New York Academy of 
Sciences. 



Leighty on California Council 

Ray Leighty, '38, was recently elected to 
the Council of the California Chapter 
of the Soil Conservation Society of 
America. This honor came in a little 
more than two years as Assistant Pro- 
fessor with the Soil Science Department 
at California State Polytechnic College 
in San Luis Obispo, California. Prior to 
moving to the West Coast, Mr. Leighty 
served as Supervisory Soil Scientist with 
the Soil Conservation Service in May- 
field, Kentucky. In addition to handling 
a number of courses, his specialty is 
soil classification and correlation, soil 
conservation and land use planning. In 
a recent letter he says, "Last year Cal 
Poly issued more B.S. degrees in Soils 
than any other college or university in 
the U. S. We practice what is called an 
'upside-down' curriculum starting stu- 



20 



the Maryland Magazine 



dents in their major during the freshman 
year, rather than concentrating all in the 
last two years. We use the 'learn by 
doing' approach." 



Plant Quarantine 



Charles R. O'Dell, '60, has been 
appointed a Plant Quarantine Inspector 
with the Agricultural Research Service 
of the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 
He is located at the Port of New York. 



Dr. Cardozier Appointed 
Department Head 



Dr. V. R. Cardozier is the newly 
appointed Head of the Department of 
Agricultural and Extension Education of 
the University of Maryland College of 
Agriculture. His appointment became 
effective September 1, according to Dr. 
Gordon M. Cairns, Dean of the College 
of Agriculture. 

Formerly called the Department of 
Agricultural Education and Rural Life, 
the Department has been expanded 



within the past year to include instruc- 
tion in Extension Education. l)i Cai 
dozier replaces Mr. II. Palmer Hopkins. 
former acting head ol the Department 
Mr. Hopkins transferred .is Director ol 
Financial Aid lor Students to the office 
of the University's Executive Dean foi 
Student Life. 

Before accepting the Maryland 
appointment, Dr. Cardozier was an 

Associate Professor ol Agricultural I du 
cation at the University of Tennessee. 
Knoxville, Tennessee. He joined the 
University of Tennessee faculty in 1957. 
For six months of 1959 he was on leave 
of absence to the Ofiicc of Education 
in Washington, D. C, as a specialist in 
research and teacher training. 

Dr. Cardozier is the author of two 
books — Growing Cotton and Public Re- 
lations for Vocational Agriculture. He 
is well known professionally as the 
author of more than 30 articles in the 
field of agricultural education. 

He is treasurer of the National Asso- 
ciation of Teacher Educators in Agri- 
culture. This association was just re- 
cently organized with Dr. Cardozier 
playing a prominent part in its forma- 
tion. His fraternal affiliations include: 
Gamma Sigma Delta; Phi Delta Kappa; 
and Alpha Gamma Rho. 



Si \hi ix Joins I'm i no I )i PARTMI M 

Maryland's i II and I I \ members are 
expected lo be especially interested in 
the appointment ol Mi I bomai Stablei 
.is I xtension Poultryman in the Poultry 
Department ol the University ot Mary 
land ( ollege ot Agriculture One ol Mi 
Stabler's dunes will be to work with 
youth ot the State who are cm 
poultry projects. He will assisi m train 
ing judging teams, such as the State I 
and Stale Poultry Judging teams; and 
with their broiler growing, turkey, and 
egg projects. A good part ol Ins time 
will also be spent working with adults 
engaged in poultry mdustr\. 

A graduate ol the University ot 
Maryland, Mr. Stabler majored in poul- 
try husbandry as an iindergr.nluale: al 
present is taking advanced work in 
poultry in the Graduate School ot the 
University ol Maryland. 



Entomologists Invade Vienna 

Dr. William E. Bickley. Head. Depart- 
ment of Entomology, and eight Man- 
kind staff members and alumni partici- 

(Continued on next page) 



* 



# 




4- 



* 



Dme/ifo- that tnak weto meal a feaSt 



November-December , I960 



21 



pated in the International Congress of 
Entomology in Vienna, Austria, last 
summer. Other Maryland staff or alumni 
in attendance were: William H. Ander- 
son, Carlos S. Carbondell, Thomas J. 
C'urtin, Yehia M. Ezzat, Jack C. Jones, 
Dr. George Langford, Harold Newson, 
and John E. Scanlon. 



College of 

ARTS AND 
SCIENCES 



Slafj of the College 



research and industry. Dr. Purdy first 
presents his classes with the theory of 
instrumental work, then the students 
must use the instruments in laboratory 
work to solve experimental problems. 
Analytical chemists are now so much 
in demand that there are not enough to 
fill existing vacancies. 



Food for Man in Space 

Algaeic metabolism and growth may be- 
come very important to the man in 
space, according to Dr. Robert W. 
Krauss of the Department of Botany, 
because algae is able to liberate oxygen 
and to absorb and reduce carbon 
dioxide. 

Dr. Krauss has been directing funda- 
mental research into the physiology of 
algae. This research has been ex- 
panded by a grant of $216,000 from 
the National Aeronautic and Space 
Administration. 

All of the oxygen breathed by man- 
kind daily has been liberated by plants 
through photosynthesis. It is possible 
that for long trips in space or for bases 
on other planets man will need to sur- 
vive in a closed chamber which is made 
as self sufficient as possible. 

"The studies here at the University 
of Maryland will be directed toward 
adding to our store of information re- 
garding the fundamental biochemistry, 
and growth characteristics of a number 
of strains of algae," explains Dr. Krauss. 



Chemistry Department Pioneers 



Dr. Ellis R. Lippincott, Professor of 
Chemistry, Dr. F. E. Welsh, student of 
Dr. Lippincott, and Dr. C. E. Weir of 
the National Bureau of Standards, have 
developed an efficient method of study- 
ing solids with infrared techniques. A 
cell, using diamonds and sapphires as 
window materials, can be used routinely 
to study infrared spectra of all solids. 
The sample to be studied does not need 
preliminary work and spectra with 
sharp, strong bands are obtained as 
quickly as in the fastest available 
methods. 

A recent issue of The Analyzer car- 
ried an article concerning the Univer- 
sity's courses in the field of instrumental 
analysis. According to the article, the 
University of Maryland is one of only 
a few universities to offer extensive 
courses in this field. 

Dr. William C. Purdy, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Chemistry, has been the leader 
in training students in instrumental 
analysis, important for employment in 



Young Seminarian Also Pastor 



Ramon E. McDonald, '58, recently be- 
gan his fifth year as pastor of the Mt. 
Zion-Owensville Methodist Circuit. 

Mr. McDonald was not through col- 
lege when the congregation asked him 
to take over in place of his father, who 
had died suddenly. He was then carry- 
ing two churches as well as working his 
way through school. Mr. McDonald 
has, since then, graduated from the Uni- 
versity and begun his seminary educa- 
tion. The congregation has paid his tui- 
tion to Wesley Seminary, American 
University, each year. 



Commandant Sothoron of the 
2070th 



Norwood S. Sothoron, '34, who is Com- 
mandant of Charlotte Hall Military 
Academy, was recently appointed Com- 
mandant of the 2070th Army Reserve 
Support Unit, District of Columbia, 
U. S. Army Reserve School. The School 



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the Maryland Magazine 



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Youngest Chamber Manager 

James P. Lowe, '54, is Manager of the 
Association Service Department of the 
United States Chamber of Commerce, 
having held that position for a year. He 
is the youngest manager the Chamber 
has ever had. Mrs. Lowe is the former 
Patricia Siegman, Ed. '55. 



Dr. Hewes at WVU 

Dr. C. Gordon Hewes, '54, has been 
appointed Associate Professor of Gross 
and Neurological Anatomy at West Vir- 
ginia University. Dr. Hewes was for- 
merly at the College of Medical 
Evangelists, San Bernadino. 

A graduate of the Washington Mis- 
sionary School, Dr. Hewes received his 
M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. He is a member 
of Sigma Xi (national research honor 
society), the Electron Microscope Soci- 
ety of America and the American Asso- 
ciation of Anatomists. 

Dr. Hewes is active in medical re- 
search and the author of several articles 
which have appeared in professional 
journals. 



Sales Seminar at Syracuse 

James H. Saylor, '57, attended a Na- 
tional Sales Seminar at Syracuse Uni- 
versity last summer. Mr. Saylor is a pro- 
fessional service representative of the 
Pfizer Laboratories division of Chas. 
Pfizer & Co., Inc. 

Participants in the Seminar reviewed 
the structure and functions of the 
human body, the nature of disease- 
causing germs, and the ways in which 
the body fights illness. Following these 
foundation courses in science, the men 
took part in classes and workshops on 
Pfizer pharmaceutical products, profes- 
sional speech, information presentation 
and other management subjects. 



Directs Information Service 

William J. Handley, '42, has been 
named Director of the Information 
Center Service of the United States 
Information Agency. 

(Continued on next page) 

November-December, 1960 



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Mr. Handley has been the Agency's 
Assistant Director for the Near East for 
the past three years. 

In his new post, Mr. Handley directs 
USIA's 160 Information Service Cen- 
ters and libraries in 86 countries and 
formulates policies for the Agency's 
book programs, exhibits and other cul- 
tural operations overseas. 

Before joining the overseas informa- 
tion program in 1951, Mr. Handley 
served with the State Department. From 
1945 to 1948 he was stationed in Cairo, 
Egypt, and also was attached to Ameri- 
can diplomatic missions at Beirut, Jeru- 
salem, Damascus, Baghdad, Tehran, 
Jidda and Addis Ababa. He was USIA's 
Deputy Country Public Affairs Officer 
in New Delhi, India, from 1951 to 1955. 



Dr. Taylor Receives Silver Medal 



Dr. John K. Taylor, a chemist with the 
Analytical Chemistry Section of the Na- 
tional Bureau of Standards, has received 
a U. S. Department of Commerce Silver 
Medal for Meritorious Service. He was 
cited for "recognition of his contribu- 
tions to accurate electrochemical meth- 
ods of analysis." Dr. Taylor's present 
work is in the application of physical 
methods to analytical chemical research. 

Dr. Taylor received his B.S. in chem- 
istry from George Washington Univer- 
sity in 1934. He received his M.S. and 
Ph.D. from the University of Maryland 



in 1938 and 1941, respectively. He 
joined the Bureau in 1929. Dr. Taylor 
is very active in science education. He 
is a member and past chairman of the 
Joint Board on Science Education of 
the Washington Academy of Sciences, 
and editor of "The Reporter," a news- 
letter for science and mathematics 
teachers. 



Assistant Dean at Purdue 

Dr. G. E. Cwalina, '31, Professor of 
Pharmaceutical Chemistry in the School 
of Pharmacy at Purdue University, has 
been named Assistant Dean of the 
School. Dr. Cwalina, who has been in 
charge of counseling and guidance, will 
devote most of his time to this field of 
work expanding it under the five-year 
pharmacy course which recently became 
operative. 

Dr. Cwalina earned his bachelor's, 
master's, and Ph.D. degrees from the 
University of Maryland. 



New Foreign Language 
Professors 

A University of Maryland alumnus is 
among the new assistant professors re- 
cently appointed to the Department of 
Foreign Languages. Donald R. Hitch- 
cock, '52, is teaching Russian. He for- 
merly held a fellowship at Dumbarton 
Oaks from Harvard, where he is com- 
pleting his doctorate. 



Dr. Claire Strube Schradieck, Assist- 
ant Professor of German, comes from 
the Maryland School of Pharmacy in 
Baltimore. With a Ph.D. from Johns 
Hopkins, she has taught at Western 
Reserve University, and later headed up 
the Modern Language Department at 
Davis and Elkins College. Dr. Schra- 
dieck's father, who was Professor of 
Music at the Peabody Conservatory, 
started the Baltimore Symphony Orches- 
tra in 1916. 

Dr. Henry Mendeloff is Assistant 
Professor of Foreign Languages, and 
also of Foreign Language Education in 
the College of Education, where he 
teaches foreign language methods and 
supervises student teachers in language. 
Last summer at Catholic University he 
was in charge of the Foreign Language 
Workshop, where he taught a seminar 
on A Foreign Language Program for the 
High School, and then taught history of 
the Spanish language. His book on The 
Evolution of the Conditional Sentence 
Contrary to Fact in Old Spanish was 
published this year by the Catholic 
University Press. 



Research in Spain 



Professors Graciela Nemes and Mar- 
guerite Rand did research in Spain this 
past summer. Dr. Nemes, on a grant 
from the American Philosophical Soci- 
ety, was collecting material for her book 
tracing the influence of Zenobia Jimenez 
on her husband, the late Nobel Prize- 



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the Maryland Magazine 



winning poet. Juan Ramon Jimenez, 
once a member of Maryland's Foreign 
Language Department. She visited the 
birthplaces oi Mr. and Mrs. Jimenez. 

Professor Rand, with a grant from the 
General Research Board oi the Univer- 
sity's Graduate School, is writing a sec- 
ond book on Azorin, literary leader in 
present-day Spain. She had various in- 
terviews with him in Madrid, and visited 
his birthplace. 

The principal newspapers of Madrid, 
Barcelona, and Valladolid interviewed 
the two Maryland researchers. They 
met many of Spain's outstanding novel- 
ists, scholars, and great literary figures. 



Spanish by Television 

A course in elementary Spanish over the 
University's closed-circuit TV has been 
introduced this fall by Professor Frank 
Goodwyn. Students are offered two tele- 
casts a week plus practice sessions in 
small groups. The textbook for the 
course was written by Dr. Goodwyn for 
his TV broadcasts initiated last year 
over WTOP. 



Vermont Institute of Critical 
Languages 

Mrs. Marie Boborykine, the University'; 
senior Russian teacher, participated in 
the Institute of Critical Languages held 
this past summer at Windham College 
in Putney, Vermont. Scholars from lead- 
ing universities in the country gave their 
views on the teaching of Russian, Ara- 
bic, and Hindi. Mrs. Boborykine found 
particularly interesting a seminar o/i 
methods of teaching Russian in high 
schools, with a demonstration lesson in 
the Putney High School. 



Plato in Paperback 

Professor Leonora Cohen Rosenfield's 
translation of Alexandre Koyre's Dis- 
covering Plato has been re-issued in 
paperback this fall in the first series 
of paperbacks ever published by the 
Columbia University Press. 



Publication in England 

Professor Alfred Bingham's review of 
Lester Crocker's An Age of Crisis has 
just appeared in the October Hibbert 
Journal. This critique of Crocker's study 
of ethics in eighteenth century France 
formed part of the research conducted 
by Dr. Bingham under a summer grant 
from the General Research Board of 
the University's Graduate School. 

(Continued on next page) 



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Microbiology Notes 

The second annual lecture series on 
"Theoretical and Applied Aspects of 
Modern Microbiology" has been 
arranged for the 1960-61 academic year. 
The first lecture was given by Dr. Rob- 
ert L. Starkey, Professor of Agricultural 
Microbiology, Rutgers University, New 
Brunswick, New Jersey on Thursday, 
October 20th. His subject was "Sulfate- 
Reducing Bacteria — Physiology and 
Practical Significance." This lecture 
series is sponsored jointly by the Ameri- 
can Cyanamid Company, Chas. Pfizer 
and Sons, and Merck and Company. 

Professor Raymond N. Doetsch has 
recently edited a book entitled Micro- 
biology, Historical Contributions from 
1776 to 1908. The Rutgers University 
Press is the publisher of this new book. 

Professor Michael J. Pelczar, Jr., was 
appointed to a committee which made 
arrangements for a national conference 
on Anti-microbial Agents. The confer- 
ence was held at the Mayflower Hotel 
in Washington, D. C, on October 26, 27 
and 28, under the sponsorship of the 
Society for Industrial Microbiology. 

Doctor Osamu Itikawa, Chief of the 
Third Research Division, National Insti- 
tutes of Animal Health, Tokyo, Japan, 
visited the Department of Microbiology 
to observe methods of interest to his 
country. 



College of 

BUSINESS AND 

PUBLIC 

ADMINISTRATION 



Jewler Joins WWDC 

Jerry Jewler, '56, recently joined the 
public relations staff of radio station 
WWDC, Washington, D. C. Mr. Jewler 
spent two years with the Army prior to 
taking his new position at WWDC. A 
journalism major, he also holds a mas- 
ter's degree in American civilization 
from the University of Maryland. 



Book for Children 

Elizabeth Johnson, '40, is the author of 
a book for children, The Mysterious 
Trunk, published in September. She is 
writing another book which is scheduled 
for publication in 1961. 



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26 



the Maryland Magazine 



Bedford on Journalism Staff 

Jimmy Bedford, formerly Instructor in 
the William Allen White School of 
Journalism at the University of Kansas, 
has been appointed Assistant Professor 
of Journalism at the University of 
Maryland. 

Mr. Bedford holds A.B., B.J., and 
M.A. degrees in journalism and eco- 
nomics from the University of Missouri. 
He has worked on newspapers in Mis- 
souri, Canada, and England. 

He has spent the last two years work- 
ing his way around the world as a free 
lance writer and photojournalism The 
trip took him 85,000 miles through 50 
countries on five continents, selling arti- 
cles and pictures to American and 
foreign periodicals. 

A large part of the trip was made by 
motor scooter, traveling through Africa, 
the Middle East and Asia. Mr. Bedford 
hopes to complete his book Around the 
World on a Nickel within the next year. 

At Maryland he is teaching courses 
in community journalism, press photog- 
raphy, picture editing, typography, and 
editorial writing. 



Two Join Economics Staff 

Two new faculty members have been 
appointed to the staff of the Department 
of Economics. 

Dr. Robert E. L. Knight, Assistant 
Professor specializing in labor eco- 
nomics, was graduated from Harvard 
College magna cum laude and holds a 
Ph.D. degree from the University of 
California. He has recently authored a 
book on the labor movement. Dr. 
Knight has been a member of the facul- 
ties of the Universities of California 
and New Mexico. In addition, he spent 
a year at the London School of Eco- 
nomics as a Fulbright scholar. 

Dr. Stephen W. Rousseas, Visiting 
Associate Professor specializing in inter- 
national economics, holds bachelor's, 
master's and Ph.D. degrees from Co- 
lumbia University. He has held faculty 
positions with Bard College and Yale, 
Michigan and Columbia Universities. 



Geography Research 

A number of the maps pertaining to 
wheat in the Atlas of the World's Re- 
sources by Dr. William Van Royen, 
Head of the Department of Geography, 
have been used in an important publica- 
tion of the Centre d'Etude de l'Azote of 
Geneva, Switzerland, and entitled "Pro- 
gressive Wheat Production." This beau- 
tifully illustrated volume of 338 pages 
was prepared by a special international 

(Continued on page 3 1 ) 



TV time is time for Coke! 

wmmm 



varra*>,*i^* 





When someone slips out 

between two of your favorite programs 

and comes back with frosty bottles 

of ice-cold Coke for everyone 

. . . the whole family brightens ! 

Bring home the Coke . . . today! 

Bottled under authority of The Coca-Cola Company by 
THE WASHINGTON COCA-COLA BOTTLING COMPANY 
Silver Spring, Md. 



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November-December, I960 



27 




By Sally Ladin Ogden 



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Plum Pudding is the most traditional 
and best known of all holiday desserts. 
Originating in England, these treasured 
"receipts" were brought to this country, 
tucked in among the linens, Sheffield 
Plate and china so carefully packed in 
great chests, by the wives of the early 
colonists who settled the Virginia and 
Maryland areas. 

It is interesting to know that the more 
austere and frugal Pilgrims who landed 
in Plymouth and settled the Massachu- 
setts and Connecticut area, frowned on 
the making of Plum Pudding — even re- 
garded the eating of it as a sin! 

They had separated from the Church 
of England and fled to this country to 
practice a religion free of ceremony. 
And since Christmas, with its traditional 
ceremonies and feasts, was the most im- 
portant observance of the Church of 
England, the Pilgrims didn't observe 
Christmas at all! 

In England and later in this country, 
Plum Puddings were made months . . . 
even years ... in advance of the holiday 
season. Usually, late in the fall, female 
members of the family would gather in 
the big kitchen to chop suet, cut fruits, 
take turns stirring the great bowl of 
batter and ladling it into cloth squares. 

Each square was carefully tied with 
string and hung from a wooden rod 
suspended over a great kettle of boiling 



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water and boiled for hours. Later, they 
hung from the rafters of a cool, dry 
storeroom. 

It was served up with noggins of 
warm brandy poured over and set 
aflame. The candles were quenched and 
the flaming pudding borne into the din- 
ing room, scenting the air with its heady 
fragrance and brightening the eyes and 
cheeks of the diners gathered 'round, 
with the bright light of the flames. 

Today the austerity of the Pilgrims 
has long since been relaxed and the 
days of great kitchens and servants, too, 
have passed. But Plum Pudding is as 
much enjoyed as ever, and you can 
enjoy both the spectacle of its flaming 
and the deliciousness of its spicy fruit 
flavor with the use of fine products 
available in supermarkets. 

Today's homemakers seldom have the 
time ... or the willing helpers ... or 
the great variety of spices and fine in- 
gredients needed for making plum pud- 
dings. Instead, they stock their shelves 
with fine CROSSE & BLACKWELL 
plum puddings that are available at 
food markets. They need only heating 
to be served. 

A new way of heating this plum pud- 
ding and serving it beautifully aflame 
has been developed, using aluminum 
foil, lemon extract and lumps of sugar. 

1. Have oven preheated to 300°F. Open 
large end of plum pudding can with 
the rotary key opener, leaving pud- 
ding on can lid. 

2. Place pudding with lid on large piece 
of aluminum foil and wrap complete- 
ly. Heat for 40 minutes. 

3. Remove pudding from oven and place 
on dessert serving plate. Turn back 
foil, folding and crimping it to make 
a silver border around pudding. 

4. Place sprig of holly on top of pud- 
ding. 

5. Pour lemon extract into glass custard 
cup and dip lumps of sugar in it. 
Place on the foil, all around the hot 
pudding. 

6. Touch each lump of sugar with a 
match and show plum pudding en- 
circled with a ring of flame. When 
the flames die out, pudding may be 
served with a topping of ice cream or 
hard sauce. (Hard sauce is made by 
creaming together 1/3 cup butter or 
margarine and 1 cup confectioners 



28 



the Maryland Magazine 



Wi 



amen 



sugar with electric mixer or by hand. 
Flavor with 1 teaspoon lemon extract 
and a sprinkling of nutmeg.) 



A comparatively small but nationally 
known firm, SOUTHERN FARMS of 
Walkersville, Maryland, is best recog- 
nized for its AUNT LUCY SMOKED 
HAMS, turkeys, bacon, sausage, corn 
meal and other delectable foods, which 
for the past 25 years have been shipped 
to the far corners of the globe. 

The Stauffer Brothers created the 
"Aunt Lucy" products. They took the 
name from a trusted and beloved Negro 
servant of the family, who had helped 
raise many families of Stauffer children. 
Some of "Aunt Lucy's" recipes, com- 
bined with those of their own, are used 
in the products today. 

An AUNT LUCY HAM takes six to 
twelve months to process. It is soaked 
in brine, then slowly hickory smoked — 
it is then hung to be aged to its proper 
flavor. 

The hickory smoked turkeys are a 
rare delicacy. These broad breasted 
bronze bred birds come from the Shen- 
andoah Valley of Virginia and are cured 
in special spices, then thoroughly cooked 
and smoked over slow burning fires of 
hickory wood. 

A SOUTHERN FARM'S shipment is 
beautifully packaged and makes an ideal 
gift at any season of the year. 



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for estimates and information 
Call LE. 9-3384. 

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401 N. CHARLES at Mulberry 
Baltimore, Md 




Desserts are served more during the 

holidays than at anj other time ot the 

soar. A tew oJ Mary Collins recipes 

(Home Economics Director) ol the 

Mccormick company, inc., oi 

Baltimore, Mil., are featured below foi 

your holiday pleasure. 



ANISE COOKIES 

1 teaspoon sail 
4 eggs 

2 cups sugar 

1 teaspoon MeC'ormick Anise Extract 
4 cups sifted all-purpose flour 

Add salt to eggs and beat until thick 
and lemon-colored. Gradually add sugar 
and continue beating until dissolved. 
Stir in anise extract, then add flour, 
mixing well (makes a moderately still 
dough). Chill dough for several hours. 
Roll into a rectangular sheet, Vz inch 
thick, on a floured board; cut into \Vz 
inch squares. Place on greased baking 
sheet. Chill, uncovered, for about an 
hour. Bake in a 350°F. oven 15 to 20 
minutes. Cool, and store in a covered 
container. Makes about 5 dozen. 

Note: If desired, you may make im- 
pression using a Springerle rolling pin, 
then cut into cookies. 



EASY COCONUT MACAROONS 

1 cup sweetened condensed milk 
3 to 4 cups flake coconut 
1 to 2 teaspoons McCormick or 
Schilling Almond Extract 



eeeteetcciec'cctec'c* 




&eagon'g Greetings 



Mix together milk. COCOnUt, and al- 
mond extract. Drop teaspoonfuls ot 
mixture on greased baking sheets. Hake 
in a 350 F. oven 10 to 12 minutes. Re- 
move from sheet immediately. Cool on 
rack. Makes about 2 do/en 

{Continued <>n next page) 



c/JurjJbLucy 



HICKORY SMOKED AGED 
HAMS 

WRITE OR STOP BY 

SoutAenn ?a%m4 

6 Miles North of Frederick 
on Route 194 

WALKERSVILLE, MD. 

Vinewood 5-2(>'21 



Open Daily 8 to 5 



Sunday 1 tO 








HICKEY-FREEMAN CtOTHES 
CHURCHItL HATS 
EXCEUO SHIRTS 



WARNER'S 



20 E. BALTIMORE STREET 



BALTIMORE, MD. 



November-December , 1960 



29 



Qo*. 



MoAifiand It/amen 



SPICY RAISIN CAKE 

Vi cup butter 
1 cup sugar 
1 egg 

1 teaspoon McCormick pure Vanilla 
Extract 

2 cups sifted cake flour 

\Vz teaspoons McCormick Cinnamon 

1 teaspoon McCormick Nutmeg 

1 tablespoon baking powder 

Va teaspoon soda 

Vz teaspoon salt 

1 cup butter milk 

1 cup seedless raisins, plumped 
Flour for raisins 

Cream butter; gradually add sugar, 
beating until light and fluffy. Add egg 
and vanilla; beat hard. Sift together 
flour, cinnamon, nutmeg, baking pow- 
der, soda and salt; add alternately with 
milk to the creamed mixture. (Add 
flour first and last.) Stir in raisins which 
have been plumped. (To plump, heat 
raisins 10 minutes with 2 tablespoons 
water; drain if necessary and flour light- 
ly.) Mix well. Pour into a greased loaf 
pan and make at 350°F. about 50 min- 
utes. Makes 1 loaf. 



MAPLE PECAN FUDGE 



3 

2 

Vz 



V* 



'4 



cups sugar 

tablespoons brown sugar 

cup water 
1 cup milk 
~> tablespoons butter 

teaspoon McCormick pure Vanilla 

Extract 

teaspoon McCormick Maple Ex- 
tract 
1 cup chopped pecans 



Combine sugar, brown sugar, water 
and milk in a saucepan; cook, stirring 
constantly until sugar dissolves. Con- 
tinue cooking, without stirring, until 
syrup reaches 236°F., or a small amount 
forms a soft ball in cold water. Remove 
from heat; add butter and let cool, 
without stirring, until lukewarm (110° 
F.). Then beat until mixture thickens 
and loses its gloss. Quickly mix in nuts. 
Spread at once in an 8-inch square pan; 
cut in squares. 



RUM HARD SAUCE 

Vz cup butter 
2 cups powdered sugar 
1 teaspoon McCormick or Schilling 
Rum Extract 



oA ^Dell Pressed 3Kan <Wears a Mat 



SOUTHCOMB 

MEN'S HATS 

STETSON HAT QUARTERS 

Stetson Ties 




109 E. BALTIMORE STREET 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



LExington 9-5799 



Cream butter; gradually add sugar, 
mixing until smooth. Add rum extract; 
mix until well blended. Excellent for 
topping gingerbread, spice cake, pud- 
ding and gelatin. 

BRANDIED APPLE FRITTERS 

4 medium apples 

2 tablespoons McCormick Brandy 
Extract 

2 tablespoons water 

1 egg, separated 
Vz cup milk 

1 tablespoon sugar 

1 cup flour 
Vz teaspoon salt 
\Vz teaspoons baking powder 

Pare, core and slice apples in circles 
or cut into sections. Mix together brandy 
extract and water and pour over apples; 
cover tightly with foil. Let set while 
making batter. Combine well-beaten egg 
yolk with milk and sugar. Sift together 
flour, salt and baking powder; add to egg 
mixture. Fold in stiffly beaten egg white. 
Dip brandied apples in this batter and 
fry in deep fat at 375°F. about 3 min- 
utes. Sprinkle with powdered sugar. 

Note: Tart, firm, juicy apples such as 
Winesaps, Jonathans, Duchess, Roman 
Beauties or Greenings are excellent for 
this. 



PINEAPPLE CAKE 



2!/4 

2V2 

Vz 

Vz 

1 



cups sifted cake flour 
teaspoons baking powder 
teaspoon salt 
cup shortening 
cup sugar 

1 teaspoon McCormick Pineapple 
Extract 

2 eggs 
2/3 cup milk 

Sift together flour, baking powder and 
salt. Cream shortening; gradually beat 
in sugar, creaming thoroughly. Add 
pineapple extract and eggs, one at a 
time, beating after each addition. Add 
flour mixture alternately with milk, mix- 
ing until smooth. Pour into 2 greased 
8-inch layer cake pans. Bake in a 350° 
F. oven 25 to 30 minutes. Cool, then 
frost with your favorite frosting. 



^ 



"Washington's Best Restaurant" 

Holiday Magazine ( 4th Consecutive Year) 

"One of America's Ten Best" 

National Poll 

OCCIDENTAL 

Where Statesmen Dine 

1411 Pennsylvania Ave. N.W. 

Between the Washington & Willord Hotels 

Open Daily & Sunday 11:30 A.M. -1:00 A.M. 
Telephone 01. 7-6467 



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A- 



Extablished For Ov 



Meetings And Banquets Accommodating 10 To 250 Persons. 



30 



the Maryland Magazine 



College of 

Business and 

Public Administration 

(Continued from page 27) 



committee of agronomists. The Centre 
d'Etude de l'Azote is the international 
organization of the industrial producers 
of nitrogen. 

During the past summer, Dr. Frank 
Ahnert continued his field studies of 
the physical environment in northern 
Greenland, which he began last year. 
Particular emphasis was placed on the 
investigation of terrain features in the 
ice-free land areas north of the Green- 
land icecap. For this purpose, Dr. 
Ahnert participated in an expedition of 
the U. S. Army Transportation Corps. 
Field observations were made in Kron- 
sprins Christians Land (northeastern 
Greenland) and in Peary Land, which 
lies only 440-550 miles from the North 
Pole. 



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Colonel O'Neill 

Armed Forces Activities 

Lt. Colonel Richard J. O'Neill, '59, is 
attending the Army War College ai 
Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania. The 
school prepares selected officers for 
future assignments to top staff and com- 
mand positions in the Armed Forces and 
other key government positions. 

First Lieutenant Robert H. Ratcliff, 
'59, recently completed the seven-week 
ranger course at the Infantry School, 
Fort Benning, Georgia. 

Army Reserve Captain Joseph J. Ball, 
'50, recently completed two weeks of 
annual active duty training at Fort 
Eustis, Virginia. 

(Continued on next page) 



xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 
x X 

A LITTLE BIT OF NORWAY 
IN MARYLAND 

BERTHA L. KNUDTSEN'S GIFT SHOP 

• Hand made decorative Sweaters and Socks for the Collegian and Sportsman 
• Gifts For The Bride 

• China and fine Glassware from Norway 

• Native dolls in hand made costumes S 

EVNA ROAD, PARKTON, MD. Tel.: FLanders 7-5519 x 

From Baltimore drive north to Towson, out on the Harrisburg Expressway to Route 137, turn X 
right to Mt. Carmel road, then left and drive 2 miles to Evna Road, make a right turn and ride X 
about a mile and the mailbox will show the name Knudtsen, turn right. X 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 



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326 NORTH HOWARD STREET 

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(J~>ci rci-^Arvo 1 1 «3 chool 

Secretarial - Dramatic Art and Radio 

Day and Evening 

805 N. Charles St. YE. 7-1155 

Baltimore, Md. 



November-December, 1960 



31 



KOESTER'S 
TWINS 

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TASTE THE DIFFERENCE 
QUALITY MAKES! 



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ALL MEAT FRANKS 

Every ounce of the pure beef and 
pork in Esskay's all-meat Franks 
is carefully selected by Esskay's 
experts, who season and spice 
these famous franks to whole- 
some, flavorful perfection. Be 
sure to ask for Esskay Franks — 
they're the finest made! They're 
on sale in the Byrd Stadium and 
new Student Activities Building. 
Wm. SCHLUDERBERG — T. J. KURDLE CO. 



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ook tutors '. 


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; MARYLAND BOOKS - SCHOLARLY BOOKS J 


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' Baltimore 1, Md. « 


'. ALLEN W. SCHULTZ 





School of 

DENTISTRY 



Kyrle W. Prcis, D.D.S. 



Guatemalan Visitors 

Six dental educators from Guatemala 
visited Baltimore recently to study new 
methods and equipment at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland School of Dentistry 
that might be adapted to their own 
dental school's need. 

The Guatemalans, all members of the 
faculty of the University of San Carlos, 
conferred with Dr. Myron S. Aisenberg, 
Dean of the School of Dentistry, and 
members of his faculty. 

Dr. Guillermo Mata acted as spokes- 
man for the visitors, and Dr. Jose E. 
Medina, Professor of Operative Den- 
tistry and Acting Head of the Depart- 
ment at the Dental School, served as 
interpreter for his colleagues. 



Alumni News Notes 

Marvin B. Goldberg, '56, has been in 
his own office for the past 18 months. 
He and his wife Libby and their daugh- 
ter are now at 8878 N.W. 7th Avenue, 
Miami, Florida. 

Donald P. Lewis, '58, opened his 
office for the practice of dentistry in 
August, 1960. He spent two years with 
the Navy Dental Corps after graduation 
and is now at 81 Merrimack Street, 
Haverhill, Massachusetts. 

Dr. Louis B. Slifkin, '21, has been 
appointed Instructor in Orthodontics at 
the New York University College of 
Dentistry. 

Dr. B. F. Mann, '00, recently cele- 
brated 60 years of active dental practice. 
He has maintained offices in the same 
building in Auburn, Maine, for 42 years. 
His son, Dr. Parker Mann, has been 
practicing with his father the last 21 
years. 

Dr. John H. Dempsey, '57, recently 
went into practice in Morgantown, West 
Virginia. In addition to his work in pri- 
vate practice, Dr. Dempsey will serve 
as part-time instructor in oral diagnosis 
at the West Virginia University School 
of Dentistry. 

Dr. Carey O. Miller, who practiced 
dentistry in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 
from 1926-1960, recently moved to 
Albuquerque, New Mexico. He and 
Mrs. Miller will live near their daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Ian M. Scotts. Their new 
address: 1101-A Louisiana Blvd. S.E., 
Albuquerque. 

Dr. Harvey I. Wilner, '57, recently 
separated from the Army after serving 
in Korea. He is now a resident at the 
Lubey clinic in internal medicine and 
gastroenterology. 




The largest hotel in Balti- 
more offers public rooms 
for immense banquets, 
intimate receptions, 
hard-working convention 
groups, sedate soirees, 
and your type of meet- 
ing. From 6 to 1996 
people at a time. 

Lord Baltimore 

Hotel 

Sales Dept. : LE 9-8400 
BALTIMORE 3, MARYLAND 



ALBERT 
W. SISK 
& SON 

National Distributors 
selling Canned and Frozen 

FOOD PRODUCTS 
Since 1891 

Two Offices To Serve You: 

PRESTON, MD. 
ABERDEEN, MD. 



King Bros., Inc 

PRINTING & OFFSETTING 

SArotoga 7-5835 

208 N. Calvert Street 
BALTIMORE 2. MD. 



32 



the Maryland Magazine 



College of 

EDUCATION 



Mary J. A halt 



Project for the Mentai i y 
Handicapped 

A 16-month research study administered 
by the College of Education and carried 
out in the Arlington County Public 
Schools, Arlington, Virginia, under a 
United States Office of Education grant 
is being supervised by Mrs. Esther Mills 
as Research Coordinator. Dr. Richard 
Wiggin, Supervisor of Art, Arlington 
County Public Schools, will serve as 
Resident Director of the Research Proj- 
ect and Dr. Jean R. Hebeler, Coordi- 
nator of Special Education at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, will be the over- 
all Director. The study will attempt to 
show that creative activity among re- 
tarded children can be increased if the 
art program is adapted to the pupil 
needs. It is designed to determine 
whether the development of motor 
skills, academic achievement, and social 
behavior can be modified through use of 
the experimental art program. 



Advanced Graduate Specialist 
Program 

David C. Berry submitted his applica- 
tion for a diploma in the Advanced 
Graduate Specialist Program in Educa- 
tion. Mr. Berry is the first student to 
apply for a diploma in this program 
since the program was adopted this past 
year. 



Research Fellowship 

Mrs. Julia H. Richardson, '58, has been 
awarded a Research Fellowship by the 
United States Department of Health, 
Education and Welfare Public Health 
Service. She will pursue her Ph.D. de- 
gree with a minor in psychology and a 
major in Education. Dr. Gladys A. 
Wiggin, Professor of Education, is Mrs. 
Richardson's sponsor. 



Publications 

Dr. John Lembach, Associate Professor 
of Art Education, is represented in the 
October issue of The Instructor. Under 

(Continued on next page) 

November-December, I960 



North Avenue 
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the heading "Art Appreciation" he dis- 
cusses the cover art subject, "Ta 
Matete" by Paul Gauguin. 

Dr. Orval Ulry, Director of Summer 
School and Associate Professor of Edu- 
cation, in The Science Teacher, Septem- 
ber, 1960, presents "Special Report . . . 
A Study of the Relationship Between 
Subjects Taken and Other Selected Fac- 
tors for the Class of 1958, Maryland 
Public High Schools." 

Dr. Glenn O. Blough, Professor of 
Education, will continue as Science 
Counselor of The Instructor during the 
current school year. He has served with 
the F. W. Owen Publishing Co. of Dans- 
ville, New York, in this capacity for 
several years. 

Dr. Jean D. Grambs, Lecturer in 
Education, has edited Abraham Lincoln 
— Through the Eyes of High School 
Youth, an NEA publication under the 
direction of R. B. Marston in the Lin- 
coln Sesquicentennial Commission of 
the United States, September 1959. 

Paul J. Manchak, Graduate Assistant 
in Industrial Education, explains the ex- 
perimentation being conducted in the 
Industrial Education Department in his 
article "What Can Television Offer 
Industrial Arts Teaching?" in the 
September-October, 1960, issue of The 
Industrial Arts Teacher. 



Summer Activities 

Dr. William F. Tierney, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Industrial Education, was a 
Visiting Lecturer in the Industrial Arts 
Department of the Michigan State Uni- 
versity this past summer. 

Dr. Jacob D. Goering, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Education, Institute for Child 
Study, spent the Summer Session at 
Fresno State College teaching in their 
six-week Child Study Workshop. Fol- 
lowing the teaching duties at Fresno he 
spent two weeks as a Lecturer in the 
Child Development Workshop spon- 
sored by the Elementary Education De- 
partment at the University of Arkansas, 
College of Education. 

Mrs. Helen Garstens, Assistant Pro- 
fessor in Education, and Dr. John 
Mayor, Professor Part-time in Educa- 
tion, worked with the School Mathemat- 
ics Study Group writing experimental 
curriculum materials in mathematics at 
Stanford University this summer. 



Awards 

Dr. Mabel S. Spencer was honored by 
initiation into Phi Kappa Phi at its 
spring meeting 1960. Other faculty of 
the University of Maryland were Wilson 
H. Elkins, Dorothy Emerson, Noel E. 
Foss, Florence M. Gipe, Marguerite C. 
Rand, Clyne S. Shaffner, and John S. 
Toll. 



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REMODELING 

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34 



the Maryland Magazine 



Special Assignments and Meetings 

Dr. Vernon E. Anderson, Dean of the 
College of Education, is serving as Con- 
sultant to the State Committee on Cur- 
riculum Design for Maryland Public 
Secondary Schools. 

Dr. Donald Malcy, Professor and 
Head of Industrial Education, attended 
the "Auto-Instructional Methods and 
Teaching Machines" conference held at 
the United States Office of Education 
under the direction of Roy M. Hall, 
Assistant Commissioner for Research, 
United States Office of Education. 

Dr. Clarence A. Newell, Professor of 
Education, gave the keynote address at 
the Fall Workshop for school principals 
and supervisors in Queen Anne's County 
and led discussion groups at the confer- 
ence in Towson to celebrate the open- 
ing of the new Laboratory School at 
the Towson State Teachers College. 

Dr. Vernon E. Anderson, Dean of the 
College of Education attended a four- 
day School for Executives sponsored by 
the American Association of Colleges 
for Teacher Education at Bemidji State 
Teachers College in Bemidji, Minne- 
sota, during August. 

Dr. Arthur S. Patrick, Professor of 
Education and Head of Office Manage- 
ment and Techniques, was a guest of 
the International Business Machines 
Corporation at the offices in Endicott, 
New York. He joined professors of 
business administration from 38 other 
universities in a two-week seminar that 
was established for the study of elec- 
tronic computers and the implications 
that these high speed data processors 
might have, now and in the future, on 
developing collegiate programs for the 
education of students in business and 
public administration. 

It is anticipated that the results of this 
seminar will serve as an excellent 
basis for developing the use of high 
speed computers into a valuable tool in 
our collegiate management educational 
program. 

Mr. James G. Brown, Instructor of 
Business Communications and Records 
Management, was invited to attend the 
three-week National Workshop on Eco- 
nomics for Business Teachers at Mont- 
clair State College, New Jersey, during 
August. 

The Workshop was sponsored by the 
Young Presidents' Foundation, the Joint 
Council on Economic Education, and 
the United Business Education Associa- 
tion. The purpose of the Workshop was 
to give business teachers a better under- 
standing of economic concepts as they 
pertain to business education subjects on 
the high school level. 

{Continued on next page) 




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Engineered Equipment, Casters, Trucks, 
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November-December, 1960 



35 



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Town and Country 

Caterers for 

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Weddings & Cocktail Receptions 



Candy and Other Delicacies 
Gift Packages and Baskets 
Shipped all over the World 



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Former Students 

Dr. Woodrow W. Wilkerson, Doctor of 
Education 1952, has been appointed 
Superintendent of Public Instruction for 
Virginia. 

Dr. Willis H. White, Doctor of Edu- 
cation 1957, is now Director, Division 
of Instruction, Maryland State Depart- 
ment of Education. 

Dr. William J. Ellena, Doctor of Edu- 
cation 1959, is now Assistant Execu- 
tive Secretary, American Association 
of School Administrators, Washington, 
D. C. 



Summer Session 

A Workshop in Human Relations in 
Educational Administration, the first of 
its kind, was offered by the College of 
Education this past summer for teams 
representing Maryland School Systems. 
Agencies which participated actively in 
planning the Workshop included the 
Maryland State Department of Educa- 
tion, Maryland State Department of 
Health, and the National Institutes of 
Health. Director of the Workshop was 
Dr. Clarence A. Newell of the College 
of Education. Assistant Director was 
Dr. Lucile Bowie of the Institute for 
Child Study. Specialists who partici- 
pated in the Workshop programs in- 
cluded representatives from the fields of 
psychiatry, psychology, sociology, pedia- 
trics, nursing, social work, speech, indus- 
try and education. 



Education Annex 

The College of Education has expanded 
into Education Annex, a remodeled fra- 
ternity house on Lehigh Road just be- 
hind Annapolis Hall. This new building 
will house offices for the Special Educa- 
tion, Higher Education and the NDEA 
Fellowship programs as well as for some 
of the elementary education, secondary 
education, and part-time staff members 
and Graduate Assistants. It will also 
house the newly established Reading 
Clinic. 



New Staff Members 

Frank B. Baker, Assistant Professor of 
Education and Assistant Director, Uni- 
versity Counseling Center, began his 
duties September, 1960. He will devote 
full-time to duties as Assistant Direc- 
tor of the Counseling Center, teaching 
courses at times for the College of 
Education in the area of research and 
measurements. Dr. Baker was Assistant 
Professor, University of Minnesota; 
Computor Programmer, Mayo Clinic 
and University of Minnesota; a teacher 
in Minnesota and Texas before coming 
to Maryland. He received his B.S., hi? 
M.A. and his Ph.D. degrees from the 
University of Minnesota. 



First Name in Ice Cream 
For Over A Half Century 




Thomas & Thompson Co. 

Established 1872 

The Downtown 
Prescription Drug Store 

Have Your Prescriptions 
Carefully Compounded by 

PERSCRIPTION SPECIALISTS 

at Baltimore and Light Sts. 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

— Delivery Service — 

TELEPHONE 

SAratoga 7-2960 



Juwiture 
Interior "Decorating 

Furnishing and Decorating Maryland 

Homes and Institutions for 

over 64 years 

BENSON 

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MU 5-4510 Baltimore, Md. 



>> 



J 



F. A. Davis & Sons 


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Cigars, Tobaccos, Sundries 8. Supplies 


Kitchen & Dining Equipment 


Soda Fountain Supplies 


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Baltimore 1, Md. 



36 



the Maryland Magazine 



College of 

ENGINEERING 



Presley A. Wedding 



Another Space Engineer 

John Curlander, M.E. '44, is now with 
the Martin Company as Assistant Tech- 
nical Director of the Dyna-Soar Pro- 
gram. He is responsible for directing the 
engineering effort on the Dyna-Soar for 
the hydraulic, pneumatic, ordnance, me- 
chanical controls, electrical, electronic, 
malfunction, detection and instrumenta- 
tion systems. 



Honorary Degree Awarded 

At June's commencement ceremonies, 
James E. Dingman, a 1921 Mechanical 
Engineering graduate of the University 
of Maryland, was awarded the honorary 
degree, Doctor of Engineering. Mr. 
Dingman was born in Baltimore, in 
1901. He began work with the Western 
Electric Company, American Telephone 
and Telegraph Company, in 1922. In 
1949 he was appointed Vice President 
for Personnel for the Bell Telephone 
Company and the Diamond State Tele- 
phone Company. The next year he 
assumed the position of Vice President 
for Operations, Philadelphia. From 
1952 until 1956 Mr. Dingman served as 
Vice President and General Manager, 
Director of Bell Telephone Laboratories, 
Inc. He is a member of the Long Lines 
Board; the Board of Eastern Telephone 
and Telegraph, Halifax, N. S.; The 
Board of Cuban American Telephone 
Co.; the Advisory Board of the Manu- 
facturers Trust Co.; the Appeals Com- 
mission, National War Labor Board, 
Washington; and a Director of the 
Sandia Corporation. Since 1957 he has 
served as Director of Operations of the 
American Telephone and Telegraph 
Company. 



Changes Vocation 

Lyle Parratt, C.E. '36, was graduated 
from the Episcopal Theological Semi- 
nary at Lexington, Kentucky, in June, 
1960, and ordained as minister in New 
Orleans on June 21st. Mr. Parratt has 
been on many important engineering 
projects as an engineer since he was 
graduated from Maryland — the latest 
before entering the Seminary was as 
Field Engineer on the Lake Pontchar- 
train bridge in Louisiana. 

{Continued on next page) 



I 



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A Maryland Institution 



Give To Fight Cancer ! 



Frederick Underwriters 

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FEEDS 

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November-December, 1960 



37 




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Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 

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Col. Holbrook 

Army Commendation Medal 
to Colonel Holbrook 

Colonel Charles C. (Jack) Holbrook, 
'39, recently completed a four-year tour 
of duty with the Office of the Deputy 
Chief of Staff for Logistics at the 
Pentagon. He was awarded the Army 
Commendation Medal for his work 
there. Colonel Holbrook is presently 
attending the Army War College at 
Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania. He 
earned the Master of Engineering 
Administration degree from George 
Washington University last June. 



Receives Award 

Andrew Hobokan, E.E. '60, recently 
was awarded second prize in a national 
essay contest sponsored by Tau Beta 
Pi, a national engineering honor society. 
Judges in the contest were a group of 
Tau Beta Pi members from the Sacra- 
mento, California, alumnus chapter. A 
cash award of $50.00 accompanied the 
prize. Publication of the essay, "Beyond 
Omega," is expected to be made in the 
December, 1960, Bent, the fraternity 
magazine. 



Walker and Bloem Receive Award 

Stanton Walker and Delmar L. Bloem, 
lecturers on the faculty of the Depart- 
ment of Civil Engineering, recently were 
awarded the Sanford E. Thompson 
Award of the American Society for 
Testing Materials for their paper en- 
titled "Variations in Portland Cement." 
Messrs. Walker and Bloem are, re- 
spectively, Director and Associate Direc- 
tor of Engineering of the National 
Sand and Gravel Association and 
the National Ready Mixed Concrete 
Association. 




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COATS 

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American Disinfectant Co. 

Pest Control Service 

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38 



the Maryland Magazine 



Here and There 

C. R. Dodson, M.E. '30, is now Vice- 
President of a Los Angeles bank. He is 
a registered professional engineer in 
California and is author or co-author of 
a number of papers and talks on 
petroleum technology, economics and 
financing. 

Melvin Deale, C\E. '59, is now at 
Grand Canyon, Arizona, with the Bu- 
reau of Reclamation. 

Joe B. Dougherty, M.E. '49, is now 
Major, USAF, attending Command and 
Staff School at Maxwell Air Force Base, 
Alabama. 

William Capehart Walker, Jr., M.E. 
'56, is now Lieutenant (j.g.) USN. He 
is main engines officer on the USS 
Saratoga. 

Ted Raabe, M.S. in C.E. '60, is now 
located in California with the U. S. 
Forest Service. 

Malcolm Collison, M.E. '38, earned 
his M.S. at Stevens Institute in 1946. He 
is now with Hudson Bay Mining and 
Smelting as a Consulting Mechanical 
Engineer. 

Bob Fetters, M.E. '46, is now located 
in Los Angeles, California. He is Chief 
Engineer for Marplex Company, the 
originators of molded fiberglass for 
lighting applications. 




Donald N. Streeter 



Donald N. Streeter, '50, a develop- 
ment engineer at the IBM Poughkeepsie 
Product Development Laboratory, has 
been selected for a fellowship under the 
company's new program for advanced 
degree study. Mr. Streeter will study for 
a doctorate degree in physics at Harvard 
University. IBM's new program pro- 

{Continued on next page) 

November-December, 1960 



ea&Sst 




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Power Transmission 

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EQUIPMENT & 

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Fire Extinguishers 

WASHINGTON 18, 


SUPPLY CO.. Inc. 

"MSA" Industrial 
• Gas Masks. Canisters 
& First Aid Equipment 

D. C. LAwrence 6-1362 



TOWN HALL TAVERN 

TO 9-5814 

Closest Establishment to the Campus 

Mixed Drinks Delicious Pizza 

8135 Baltimore Blvd. ample parking College Park, Md. 



REFRIGERATION SUPPLY CO., Inc. • 

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LAwrence 6-8626 




SALES 
INSURANCE 
PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 

Near University of Maryland 

WArfield 7-1010 & 7-0321 
6037 Baltimore Boulevard 

RIVERDALE. MD. 



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cup 



39 



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• Whipping Cream 

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APpleton 7-3434 



Choice of Maryland 

Suburban Residents 

Since 1927 



Student's Supply Store 

University of Maryland 

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Alumni 
Headquarters for 

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• JEWELRY 

• STATIONERY 



vides tuition and fees as well as all 
other benefits to students, who remain 
regular employees while they are full- 
time students. 

Bob Wilson, Ch.E. '54, recently left 
the DuPont Company to take employ- 
ment with the United States Govern- 
ment. He is now working at the U. S. 
Naval Propellant Plant at Indian Head, 
Maryland. 

Richard W. Coakley, '50, has joined 
the Production Department of the Dow 
Chemical Company, James River Divi- 
sion, Williamsburg, Virginia. 

Paul L. Williams, Jr., '54, recently 
joined the staff of Warren Wilson Junior 
College, Swannanoa, North Carolina. 
He is teaching mathematics. Mr. Wil- 
liams was formerly a senior engineer at 
the Lansdale Tube Company, Lansdale, 
Pennsylvania. 

Second Lieutenant John H. Shock, 
'60, is now an Assistant Project Engi- 
neer with the Air Force Command and 
Control Development Division, which 
is responsible for developing all Air 
Force electronic communications sys- 
tems. He is stationed at L. G. Hanscom 
Field, Bedford, Massachusetts. 

Captain Earle W. Brown, '50, has 
been appointed Sanitary Engineer for 
the First United States Army, at Gov- 
ernors Island, New York. He recently 
returned from a three-year assignment 
with the U. S. Army Medical Service 
Group in Okinawa. 

Lee E. Hargrave, M.S. in E.E. '60, 
has accepted the position of Senior Elec- 
tronic Engineer for Sanders Associates, 
Inc., Nashua, New Hampshire. 

Sanford S. Sternstein, '58, who is 
studying for his Ph.D. degree at Rensse- 
laer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New 
York, will write his dissertation on the 
rheological properties of hydrogen- 
bonded materials. 

J. D. Morris, '26, is Regional Man- 
ager of the Chesapeake Region of the 
Pennsylvania Railroad at Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

Richard K. Bamman, M.E. '40, Super- 
visor, Stream Improvement Section, 
Champion Paper & Fibre Co., Hamilton, 
Ohio, presented a technical paper dur- 
ing the recent 11th annual testing con- 
ference, sponsored by the Technical 
Association of the Pulp and Paper In- 
dustry (TAPPI), at the Pantlind Hotel, 
Grand Rapids, Michigan. Mr. Bam- 
man's presentation was entitled "Process 
Water." 



Tennis Star Teacher 

A former University tennis star began 
his teaching career as Instructor in 
Mechanical Engineering this semester. 

Jackson Yang, M.E. '58, has been a 
success at combining court and class- 
room. He was a top player on Mary- 



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and AFFILIATED PRODUCTS 

2214 M Street, N. W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

FEderal 7-1200 



Manufacturers and Distributors 

ic Window Shades 

ic Venetian Blinds 

•k Folding Doors 

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if Screens 

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if Vertical Blinds 

-fa Decorative Wood Coverings 




CHINESE-AMERICAN RESTURANT 

Chinese Food at Its Best 

PRIVATE DINING ROOMS 

Excellent Carry-out Service 

320 PARK AVE. MU 5-6790 

Baltimore, Md. 



BALTIMORE'E MOST 

COMPLETE and EXCLUSIVE 

Black Tie Center 

^c^lr ♦ 

formal wear 

RENTED — SOLD 
6218 REISTERSTOWN RD. 

Baltimore, Md. 
FLeetwood 8-1142 



modern 
machinists co. 

General Machine Work 

MACHINE DESIGN 

MAINTENANCE - AUTOMOTIVE 

INDUSTRIAL - AIRCRAFT 

774 Girard St., N.W. 

Washington, D. C 



Del Haven White House Motel 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 

Baltimore-Washington Boulevard 

2 Miles North — University of Maryland 

AAA — Duncan Hines — Restaurant 

Heat — Air Conditioning — Free TV 

Room Phones GRanite 4-6565 



40 



the Maryland Magazine 



land's 1957 Atlantic Coast Conference 
championship team; now he's working 
on his doctorate, serving as an instruc- 
tor and doing some coaching for the 
tennis team. 




Mr. Harwood 



Harwood Manager at FoMoCo 

Julius J. Harwood, M.S. '52, has been 
named Manager of the Metallurgy De- 
partment of Ford Motor Company's 
Scientific Laboratory. Mr. Harwood for- 
merly was head of the Metallurgy 
Branch of the Office of Naval Research, 
which he joined at the time of its crea- 
tion in 1946. In this capacity, he had 
primary responsibility for the adminis- 
tration of a comprehensive basic and 
applied research program in metallurgy, 
ceramic sciences, corrosion and special 
materials and for the coordination of all 
naval research programs in metallurgy 
and materials sciences. He was awarded 
the Meritorious Civilian Service Award 
for his Navy work in August, I960. 

In his new position, Mr. Harwood will 
direct extensive fundamental research 
programs in the physics of metals and 
alloy systems, physical metallurgy and 
ceramic science. 



Engineering Alumni Outing 

Ben Dyer, a Hyattsville Consulting En- 
gineer and a Maryland Civil Engineer- 
ing alumnus, class of '31, is convinced 
that engineers should be more gregari- 
ous. Translating this feeling into action, 
he recently was host to about 100 of his 
fellow alumni and engineering faculty at 
his Hickory Hill Farm in Howard Coun- 

{Continued on next page) 



y \ZZ\\\\\\\W\W\\\\" M ""' tlrrrrt rrrr • ■ rrn niriiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 
jiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniuiiii,!,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 



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nc. 



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Community Hall for Rent 

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PLANT: 621-27 G STREET. N.W. REpublic 7-5400 

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HUFFER-SHINN 
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BRIGGS 

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Repairs - Remodeling 



BETHESDA, MD. 



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PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 
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November-December, 1960 



41 



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Manufacturers of 

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6315 EASTERN AVENUE 

Baltimore 24. Md. 



ty. Dean Mavis informally addressed 
the group and introduced members 
of the faculty who were present. Those 
responding to Mr. Dyer's inspired invi- 
tation represented a wide range of engi- 
neering graduating classes covering a 
span of more than fifty years, for 
example, C. A. Worthen, '08, O. H. 
Saunders, '10, Seymour W. Ruff, '17, 
Charles W. Wenger, '24, Mai Wooster, 
'28, Joe Deckman, '31, Tracy Coleman, 
'35, Bob McLeod, '37, Randall Cronin, 
'42, James H. Miller, '48, Dick Reed, 
'50, Perry Sennewald, '53, Dave Mur- 
ray, '56, Thomas E. Beall, Jr., and Pat 
Clarke, both of the class of 1960. Un- 
fortunately, space limitations preclude 
inserting the whole impressive roster of 
guests. 

Among the faculty members present, 
in addition to Dean Mavis, were Profes- 
sors Hodgins, Looney, Lepper, Rivello, 
Hayleck and Cather. 

A feature of the picnic lunch was 
huge beef roasts done to a turn. 

Outdoor activities consisted of horse- 
shoe pitching, hand-shaking, back- 
slapping and breeze-shooting. 

Consensus — the party was a pro- 
nounced success. 



Space Progress 

August, 1960, seemed to be an auspi- 
cious month for the United States in 
space exploration. Among other accom- 
plishments, for the first time a satellite 
was recovered after having been placed 
in orbit. The firing and orbiting took 
place on August 10th. On August 11th 
after it had completed sixteen circuits 
around the earth an instrument capsule 
was released from the satellite, Dis- 
coverer XIII, by electronic signal from 
the earth. The capsule's velocity was re- 
duced automatically and its descent be- 
gan. Automatic mechanisms opened a 
parachute at an altitude of 50,000 feet 
and the instrument laden capsule was 
lowered slowly toward the Pacific. Air 
Force C-119 planes in the area were 
alerted by the capsule's radio signals. 
Equipped with grapples they attempted 
to locate and snatch from the air the 
parachute and its cargo. However, it 
remained for a Navy helicopter, assisted 
by radar to locate and fish the capsule 
from the ocean. A few days later, Dis- 
coverer XIV was launched. This time, 
the Air Force was successful and a 
C-119 plucked the capsule from the air 
at an altitude of about 8,500 feet. 

Remarkable instrumentation was nec- 
essary for this successful performance. 
In addition to radio signalling and sens- 
ing devices, on response to a radio 
signal from earth the capsule was sepa- 
rated from the rest of the satellite, then 
automatically a "retro-rocket" was set 
off to slow the capsule's speed and to 
start its descent at precisely the correct 
angle and location. On the way down 




Fiction 

Non-Fiction 

Children's Books 

Educational Games 
and Toys 

Stationery and 

Greeting Cards 

Religious Books and 
Bibles 

"Baltimore's Cultural Dept. Store" 

[WE rAY '0 Ji f( Ma " on d plione orders shipped premptly. 
0N A.U »00K3 \ Wf|f# fef fnl Book Co , | og . 




BOOK STORE 

516 N. CHARLES STREET 

Phone SA 7-7280 

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KNOW 
HOW 




WANT 



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VICTOR P. SKRUCK, President 

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S36 W. PRATT ST. • BALTIMORE t, MD. 
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General Insurance 

ROOM 1100 
501 St. Paul Sf. 
Baltimore 2, Md. 
LExington 9-0020 



42 



the Maryland Magazine 




Mr. Edward A. Miller 



various equipment such as the heat 
shield automatically fell away after it 
was no longer needed, and finally the 
parachute opened at 50,000 feet alti- 
tude. During the descent radio signals 
were continually sent out and to add the 
fiinishing touch, metal foil was dropped 
to facilitate locating the capsule by 
radar. 

Intimately involved in this spectacular 
step in space science progress is a Mary- 
land graduate, Edward A. Miller, M.E. 
'50. Mr. Miller is Manager, Discoverer 
Program, General Electric Company, 
Missile and Space Vehicle Department. 
Since graduation he has worked for the 
Department of Defense and for the last 
seven years has been with General Elec- 
tric Company, actively participating in 
the development of Atlas nose cones and 
space vehicles. Somehow, along with his 
work in outer space engineering, he 
found time to earn a law degree at the 
Salmon P. Chase College, Cincinnati, 
Ohio. 



James F. Shook is Co- Author of 
ASTM Paper 

James F. Shook, '49, is co-author of a 
paper presented recently in Atlantic 
City at the annual meeting of the Ameri- 
can Society for Testing Materials on 
the "Evaluation of Nuclear Moisture- 
Density Testing Equipment for Soils." 
Jim has been associated with the High- 
way Research Board of the National 
Research Council in work on the Ameri- 
can Association of State Highway Offi- 
cials Test Road at Ottawa, Illinois. This 
test road is of major significance in 
highway engineering, since one of its 
purposes is permit evaluation of the 
effect of different types of highway 
traffic on pavements of various materials 
and design. 

(Continued on next page) 




PETROLEUM STORAGE TERMINAL 

PINEY POINT, MARYLAND 

The only deep water terminal receiving ocean-going tankers 
devoted to serving the Washington area exclusively. 

INDUSTRIAL FUEL OILS CheVTOn GASOLINE 

STEUART PETROLEUM COMPANY 



EM 2-8800 



4646 40th St. N.W. 



WASHINGTON 2, D. C. 



J. McKenny Willis & Son, Inc. 



GRAIN 

FEED 

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Phone TA 2-3000 



ADVERTISERS 
MAT SERVICE 

416 Eye St., N.W. 
Washington, D. C. 

Baked Mats 

Cold-Mold Mats 

Plastic Plates 

Rubber Plates 

Stereotypes 

Thermosetting Plates 

24 Hour Service 
Call Executive 3-5265 



The 

Washington Wholesale 
Drug Exchange, Inc. 

Retail Druggist 

Owned Wholesale 
Druggist 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 
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smiTH uiEioinc 

COMPANY 



PORTABLE EQUIPMENT 

Phone UNion 4-2055 

4803 Rhode Island Ave. 

Hyattsville. Md. 



James Speros 

JVortnanay 3 arm 

Potomac, Maryland OL 2-9421 




Open daily 12 to 12 midnight 

— Air conditioned — 

Member Diner's Club and Universal 

Travel Card 



November-December, 1960 



43 



The gathering place for 
Marylanders of Good Taste 




DUKE ZEIBERT'S 

RESTAURANT 
1730 L Street 

(Two doors west of Conn. Ave.) 

STerling 3-1730 

Open 'til Midnight — Sunday 'til 10 p.m. 




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BUY U. S. SAVINGS 
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College of 

HOME ECONOMICS 



Rosa Lee Kime 



Alumnae News Note 

Mildred Stanley Wiggers, '57, received 
the Master of Science degree in home 
economics education from Iowa State 
University, August, 1960. 

Mrs. Donald L. Olmert (Rosemary 
Menikheim, '56) will be living in Hono- 
lulu, Hawaii, for the next three years. 
Mr. Olmert is Assistant Manager of the 
office of Federal Services Acceptance 
Corporation. The Olmerts have one son, 
Christopher, who is a year old. 



Holds Joint Responsibilities 

Mr. Edward L. Longley, Jr., has been 
appointed to a joint position as Assist- 
ant Professor of Art Education and Art 
in the Colleges of Education and Home 
Economics. Mr. Longley has served as 
Assistant Professor of Art in the Col- 
lege of Home Economics and was for- 
merly a teacher in Maryland. He is 
working toward his Ed.D. degree at 
American University. He received his 
M.S. degree from Teachers College, 
Columbia University and his A.B. de- 
gree from the University of Maryland. 



School of 

MEDICINE 



Dr. John Wagner 



Ophthalmology Department Head 

Dr. Richard Davison Richards has been 
appointed Professor of Ophthalmology 
and Head of the Department in the 
School of Medicine. 

Dr. Richards is the University's first 
full-time Professor of Ophthalmology, 
although the specialty has been repre- 
sented at the Medical School since 1867, 
when the first chair of ophthalmology 
and otolaryngology in the country was 
founded there. 

Departmental activities will be greatly 
expanded under Dr. Richards' direction. 
Residency training has already begun, a 



EVANS & VAN CLEEFF 

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Washington, D. C. 




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WASHINGTON, D.C. 



Thompson Furniture Co. 

Furniture of Quality 

at Reasonable Prices 

MODERN & PERIOD 

SIMMONS, KROEHLER, THOMASVILLE, 

BASSETT, GEM CRIB 8, CRADLE, LANE 

1810 Rhode Island Ave., N.E. 
Washington, D.C. LA 6-1622 



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Sales PlCu6Ji> Service 

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44 



the Maryland Magazine 




Dr. Richards 



vigorous research program is planned, 
and medical education for students will 
continue to be improved. 

Dr. Richards comes to Baltimore from 
Iowa City, where he has been Assistant 
Professor of Ophthalmology at the State 
University of Iowa for the past two 
years. 

A native of Michigan, he attended 
the University of Michigan, where he 
received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 
1948 and a medical degree in 1951. He 
served an internship and residency in 
ophthalmology at the State University 
of Iowa Hospitals and returned there in 
1958 to join the ophthalmology faculty 
after two years in the U. S. Army 
Medical Corps. 

Dr. Richards' chief research interest 
is radiation cataracts, which he studied 
at the State University of Iowa and will 
continue to study at the University of 
Maryland. 

He is a member of Alpha Omega 
Alpha, Sigma Xi Society, the American 
Board of Ophthalmology, the American 
Academy of Ophthalmology and Oto- 
laryngology, and the Association of Re- 
search in Ophthalmology. He has pub- 
lished a number of articles about his 
research in radiation cataracts. 



Alumni News Notes 

Maxwell H. Shack, '32, is presently 
Assistant Superintendent, Psychiatric 
Service, Patton State Hospital, Califor- 
nia. Dr. Shack, who was certified in 
psychiatry in 1954, was previously 
Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychia- 
try at the College of Medical Evangel- 
ists, Loma Linda, California. 

{Continued on next page) 



POOR, BOWEN, 

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Insurance & Bonding of every 
description for more than 
half a century 



Policy analysis 
Engineering surveys 
Appraisals 



Phone: LExington 9-6004 

BALTIMORE 3. MD. 

26 S. CALVERT STREET 




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Over Half Century of Continuous Service 


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CUT STONE CONTRACTORS 

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Washington 18, D. C. 


KIDLUELL & KIDWELL, Inc. 




T( 


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Plastering - Dry Wall 

Insulation 

Acoustical and Bricklaying 

BOX 266 COLLEGE PARK 
WEbster 5-4500 MD. 






Trading as 

KIERNANS 

A Complete Line of Beverages 

8200 Baltimore Blvd. College Pork, Md. 



November-December, 1960 



45 



MUSIC BOX 

OF 

LANGLEY 

A Complete Record Shop 

CLASSICAL and POPULAR 

SINGLE HITS — ALBUMS 

All Speeds 



Come In and Browse 



Open Daily 9 A.M. to 9 P.M. 

LANGLEY SHOPPING CENTER 

Langley, Md. HE. 4-9728 

Efficient and Courteous Service 

All Records at Discount Prices 



CRUSTY 
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Finest Quality 

PI ES— PASTRI ES— DON UTS 
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30 - O St., N. E. 

Washington, D. C. 

ADams 2-7111 



Murray Hardware Co. 

Your Hardware Department 
Store 

Open Daily 9 to 9 

LANGLEY SHOPPING CENTER 

UNIVERSITY BLVD. and 
NEW HAMPSHIRE AVE. 

LANGLEY PARK. MD. 

HEmlock 4-3000 



Samuel Lieberman, '32, is actively 
serving his profession in the Bronx, New 
York. He is Vice President of the Bronx 
Chapter of the American Academy of 
Science, a member of the Board of 
Directors of the New York State Acad- 
emy of General Practice, and serves as 
Editor of the Bronx County Bulletin, 
American Academy of General Practice. 

Dr. Joseph J. Smith, '30, Chief of the 
Department of Internal Medicine at the 
Bridgeport, Connecticut, Hospital, was 
recently elected President of the Con- 
necticut State Heart Association. 



School of 

NURSING 



Lillie M. Largey 



Congratulations to New Officers 

Members of the Nurses' Alumnae Asso- 
ciation were extremely proud to hear 
that Betty Rohr Singleton, '47, was 
elected President of the General Alumni 
Association of the University of Mary- 
land in June, 1960, for a term of one 
year. 

Mrs. Singleton is the first woman to 
ever hold this office in the 153-year his- 
tory of the alumni. We extend to her 
our congratulations and best wishes for 
a most successful year! 

Ethel Monroe Troy, '17, was elected 
President of the Baltimore Division of 
the General Alumni Association of the 
University of Maryland in June, 1960, 
for a term of one year. We again extend 
our sincere congratulations. 



Alumna in Haiti 

Shirley Ward, '55, is at the present time 
in Jeremie, Haiti, devoting six months of 
her time working with MEDICO. Their 
purpose there is to show the Haitians 
the American way of medicine — to im- 
prove their methods so that they can 
better help their own people. 

Jeremie is a town of 10,000 people 
located on the southern peninsula of 
Haiti. The hospital was built in 1923 by 
the United States Marines and has 100 
beds. 

Shirley writes that her primary func- 
tion is to help get the operating room 
in working condition for an American 
surgeon due there in September. How- 
ever, she also works in the ulcer clinic 
and on the wards. Among the most 
common problems are malaria, tuber- 
culosis, yaws, leg ulcers, anemia, and 
malnutrition. 



Clifton D. Mayhew, 
Inc. 

Painting & Decorating 
Contractors 




3436 Lee Highway 
JAckson 5-6131 

Arlington, Va. 



WO WO 

KK 

® 



ffluAwlVwm&> 



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VA. 

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BETHESDA CINDER BLOCK 
MANUFACTURING CO., Inc. 

Complete Line of 

MASONRY SUPPLIES 

BRICK - CINDER BLOCK 

River Rd. at B & O R.R. OL 4-1616 

BETHESDA, MD. 

umimimimnimiiinnimi 



46 



the Maryland Magazine 



Drugs and equipment are supplied by 
MEDICO and are both scarce. 



Dr. Carl Appointed to NIH 
Committee 

Dr. Mary K. Carl, Professor of Nursing 
and Chairman of the Graduate Pro- 
gram in Nursing, has been appointed by 
Dr. James A. Shannon, Director of the 
National Institutes of Health, as a mem- 
ber of the NIH Mental Health Training 
Committee. 

The committee is one of several con- 
sultant bodies established by the Surgeon 
General to assist the Public Health Serv- 
ice in carrying out the functions author- 
ized by the National Mental Health Act. 

Committee members, comprising edu- 
cators in the fields of psychiatry, psy- 
chology, social work, and nursing, are 
responsible for reviewing applications 
for grants from teaching institutions and 
making recommendations to the Na- 
tional Advisory Mental Health Council, 
and for consulting generally on the 
training program. The term of office is 
four years. 

Dr. Carl, who holds a Doctor of Phi- 
losophy degree from the University of 
Maryland, has been on the Nursing 
School faculty since 1955. 



Visit to St. Thomas 

One hundred years ago, 15 young women 
entered St. Thomas' Hospital in London 
to become the first nurses trained in the 
new school founded by Florence Night- 
ingale. Their coming marked the begin- 
ning of organized instruction for nurses 
in England and was the first step toward 
the recognition of nursing as an honored 
profession. 

A student of Miss Nightingale's, 
Louisa Parsons, founded the University 
of Maryland School of Nursing. In a 
ceremony recently, the close historical 
tie between St. Thomas' Hospital and 
the University's School of Nursing was 
formally recognized. 

Miss Judy Wilhemsen, '56, visited St. 
Thomas' Hospital and presented a grad- 
uate cap from the University to the 
matron there. A graduate cap from the 
Florence Nightingale School was in 
turn presented to her for the Maryland 
School of Nursing. 

The reaction to the cap designed by 
Miss Nightingale was described by Miss 
Wilhemsen: 

"Each nurse attending the presenta- 
tion was just a little more impressed 
than the next with the loveliness of our 
cap. This was the first time anyone there 
had seen a University of Maryland 
graduate nurse's cap." 

(Continued on next page) 



LUMBER 
' MILLWORK 

• BU [LDER'S II AKDW \K 
• PITTSBURGH PAINTS 

"Silver Spring's First lumber Yard" 




SILVER ^f SPRING 
BUILDING SUPPLY CO. 



8226 GEORGIA AVENUE AT RIPLEY ST. 
JUniper 9-2300 SILVER SPRING, MI). 



J 


OHNSTON, 


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INVESTMENT 


SECURITIES 






SOUTHERN BUILDING 




115 


N. SAINT ASAPH 


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shington 5, D. C. 




Alexar 


dria, Va. 


Sterling 3-3130 






King 


8-6600 



r D. C. Ignition ^ 
Headquarters 

Inc. 

• Complete Analysis . . . 

for difficult electric and motor troubles 

• Tune up . . . 

• Specialty repairs . . . 

• United Motors . . . 

• Bowers Batteries — Mallory 
Ignition . . . 

authorized service: carburetors, starters, 
generators, all wipers, speedometers, 
heaters, fuel pumps. 

Phone: FEderal 7-7038 

1230 20th St., N.W. 

V. Washington, D. C. J 



Ottenberg s Bakers, 

Inc. 

Quality Bakers 
For Three Generations 




RESTAURANTS 
INSTITUTIONS 



Lincoln 7-6500 
Washington, D. C. 



November-December , 1960 



47 



RESIDENTIAL 




^ORKs 



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HE. 




PORCH & TERRACE HAND 

RAILINGS • BALCONIES 

GATES • COLUMNS 

TRELLIAGE 

INTERIOR STAIR 

RAILINGS 
For Estimate Call 

LA 6-1240 
Washington, D. C. 



PARK 
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Heavy Hauling 

WASHINGTON. D. C. 
NOrth 7-5753 



(fatfikwiq^ 




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FINE FOOD & DRINKS 

Visit Our Internationally Famous Wine Cellar 

FIFTH AVE. & BRENTWOOD 

DUNDALK, MD. 

2 New Dining Rooms added to serve our 

patrons better. 

Private Banquet facilities to accommodate 

10 to 125 guests. 

For Reservations Call 

ATwater 5-0520 • ATwater 4-9854 



Alumni Association 
School of PHARMACY 
University of Maryland 



B. Olive Cole, Chairman 
Publications Committee 



Annual Luncheon of Alumni 
Association 

The Club Room of the Shoreham Hotel 
in Washington, during the Convention 
of the American Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation, which Association numbers 
many members who are graduates of the 
School of Pharmacy, University of 
Maryland, was the location of the mid- 
day luncheon of the Alumni Association 
of the School on Wednesday, August 17. 
There were no speeches, but Dean 
Noel E. Foss described the new build- 
ings of the University of Maryland 
which have recently been completed and 
occupied — the Student Union Building 
and the Science Library of the combined 
faculties on the Baltimore Campus. 

Dr. Frank J. Slama, Executive Secre- 
tary of the Alumni Association, outlined 
the many activities of the Association, 
especially the three major annual affairs 
— the Fall Frolic, the Valentine Party 
and the Annual Banquet in June. 

Those in attendance included: Ben- 
jamin F. Allen, Associate Professor of 
Pharmacy; William B. Baker, S. B. 
Penick & Co., New York, and Mrs. 
Baker; Francis S. Balassone, Chief, Divi- 
sion of Drug Control, Maryland State 
Department of Health; Frank Block, Re- 
tail Pharmacist, Baltimore, and Mrs. 
Block; Richard Barry, Schering Corpo- 
ration, Bloomfield, New Jersey; C. Jel- 
leff Carr, National Institutes of Health, 
Bethesda, and George J. Cosmides, guest 
of Dr. Carr; Irving I. Cohen, President, 
Alumni Association of the School of 
Pharmacy; Joseph Cohen, Executive 
Secretary, Maryland Pharmaceutical 
Association; B. Olive Cole, Emeritus 
Professor, School of Pharmacy; Mary 
Ann Coleman, Pharmacist, Bayonne 
Hospital, New Jersey; Mary W. Con- 
nelly, Pharmacist, Medical Health Cen- 
ter, Baltimore; John Cunzeman, Smith. 
Kline & French Laboratories, Philadel- 
phia; Amelia C. DeDominicis, Chemist, 
Maryland State Department of Health; 
John E. Donaldson, Peoples Drug 
Stores, Inc., Washington. D. C; Mrs. 
Andrew G. DuMez; Noel E. Foss, 
Dean, School of Pharmacy, and Mrs. 
Foss; Mrs. Emma Frey, Pharmacist, 
Woodlawn Pharmacy, Baltimore; Milton 
A. Friedman, Pharmacist and Chairman 
of Pharmacy Week Committee, Mary- 
land Pharmaceutical Association; Harold 
Goldfedder, President, Maryland Phar- 
maceutical Association. 



IN the MARYLAND SEGMENT 

of GREATER WASHINGTON 

ITS THE 



Suburban 



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Potomac Butter Co. 

Wholesale Dealers 

Butter 

Eggs 

Cheese 

Frozen Eggs 



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HOTEL 5CPPLY CO. 

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48 



baltimore. md. 

the Maryland Magazine 



Also present were: Georgianna S. 
Gittinger, Instructor, Pharmacology, 
School of Pharmacy; Samuel W. Gold- 
stein, Chemist, American Pharmaceuti- 
cal Association, Washington, D. C; 
Nathan I. Gruz, Retail Pharmacist; 
Ursula E. Heyer, Chief Pharmacist. 
Johns Hopkins Hospital; Robert E. 
Havranek, Noxzema Foundation Fellow 
in Chemistry; William H. Heller, Chief 
Pharmacist, Little Rock Hospital, Arkan- 
sas; L. Louis Hens, Abbott Laboratories, 
Chicago; Casimer T. Ichniowski, Emer- 
son Professor of Pharmacology, School 
of Pharmacy; Hatif H. Jalil, U. S. Pub- 
lic Health Service Fellow in Chemistry, 
School of Pharmacy; Charles I. Jarow- 
ski, Charles Pfizer & Co., Inc., Brook- 
lyn; L. M. Kantner and Mrs. Kantncr, 
Baltimore; Aaron Kadish, student. 
School of Pharmacy; Charles Kokoski, 
School of Pharmacy, George Washing- 
ton University; Robert Kokoski, Instruc- 
tor, Pharmacognosy, School of Phar- 
macy; Robert Lawson, Chief Pharma- 
cist, University of Maryland; Phillip J. 
Levine, Instructor, Pharmacy, School of 
Pharmacy; John Mentzer, Charles Pfizer 
& Co., Inc., Brooklyn; Gordon Mouat, 
Pharmacist, Burriss & Kemp, Baltimore, 
and Mrs. Mouat; Alexander J. Ogrinz, 
Pharmacist, Member, Maryland Board 
of Pharmacy; Philip Ouellette, Colgate 
Company; Thomas R. Palmer, U. S. 
Public Health, Washington, D. C; Na- 
gin K. Patel, Junior Instructor, Phar- 
macy, School of Pharmacy; Paul A. 
Pumpian, Secretary, Wisconsin Board 
of Pharmacy; Stephen J. Provenza, 
Pharmacist, Medical Arts, Baltimore, 
and Mrs. Provenza; Joseph S. Rowe, 
Abbott Laboratories, Chicago; Pierre F. 
Smith, School of Pharmacy, University 
of Rhode Island; Alan Sherman, Phar- 
macist, Washington, D. C; Frank J. 
Slama, Professor, Pharmacognosy and 
Executive Secretary, Alumni Associa- 
tion, School of Pharmacy, and Mrs. 
Slama; Charles J. Schwartz, Ciba Phar- 
maceutical Products Co., Summit, New 
Jersey; H. Nelson Warfield, Read Drug 
Co., and Treasurer, Alumni Association, 
School of Pharmacy; Morris Yaffee, 
Pharmacist, Chevy Chase, Maryland. 



Dr. Cole Honored 

Dr. B. Olive Cole, Emeritus Professor 
of Pharmacy Administration, was the 
first recipient of the Award of Merit 
given by the Lambda Kappa Sigma In- 
ternational Pharmacy Sorority at De- 
troit, Michigan, during the Sixteenth 
Biennial Convention. The Award was 
presented to her by Miss Amelia C. 
DeDominicis of Baltimore who is Grand 
Editor of the Blue and Gold Triangle, 
official publication of the Sorority. 

Lambda Kappa Sigma is composed of 
women pharmacists, educators, chemists 
and pharmacy students. 

(Continued on next page) 



SALES 




SERVICE 



Specialists in Residential and 
Commercial Air Conditioning 

Room Coolers - Package Units - Year Round Furnaces 

"Year Round Comfort in Your Home and Office" 

CALL US FOR THE NAME OF YOUR NEAREST DEALER 

YORK WHOLESALERS, Inc. 

(Wholesale Distributor) 
501 - 15th ST., SOUTH 



OTis 4-3700 



Arlington, Va. 



ENVELOPES 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

PLAIN AND PRINTED 

ENVELOPES 

Quality Envelopes 
Since 1920 

BEImont 5-8240 




UNION and RAILROAD AVENUES 
BALTIMORE 11, MARYLAND 



JUniper 9-4580 



JUniper 9-3340 



A. MYRON COWELL Inc 

MASONRY- CONTRACTORS 



538 Forest Glen Road 



Silver Spring, Md. 



CARL J. WILLIAMS & SONS 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 

918 Cooper St. • Salisbury, Mai viand • PI 9-5444 



November-December, 1960 



49 




World Tours 

Launch yourself on a trip that 
makes the Big Circuit. See 
everything: Honolulu, Tokyo, 
Hong Kong, Calcutta, Taj Ma- 
hal, Cairo, Athens, Rome, etc. 

Blast-off eight times a year. 
By air or by steamer. Start 
your count-down by getting 
Brownell folders from: 

World Wide Travel 
Serviee Corp* 

MERCURY BUILDING 

20th & K Sts. N.W. 
WASHINGTON 6, D. C. 
Phone: FEderal 3-9373 



VISIT 

Bernie Lee's 

PENN HOTEL 

(Newly renovated) 

OPEN DAILY 8 a.m. — 2 a.m. 
serving 

BREAKFAST 

LUNCHEON 

DINNER 

9 — Spacious Banquet Rooms 
Call VA 3-0300 for reservation 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 
PACKAGE GOODS 

15 W. Penn. Avenue 
TOWSON, MARYLAND 

FREE PARKING 



PURE 



Meat Products 




BRIGGS & CO. 

6601 Columbia Park Rd. SP 2-7000 

Landover, Mel. 



Pumpian Assumes New Duties 

Paul A. Pumpian, Pharmacy '50, Law 
'53, Secretary of the Wisconsin State 
Board of Pharmacy, has, within the past 
month, been elected Chairman of the 
Section on Education and Legislation of 
the American Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion and been appointed Chairman of 
the Committee on Legislation of the 
National Association of Boards of Phar- 
macy. A member of the Legislative 
Committees of the American Pharma- 
ceutical Association, the American So- 
ciety of Hospital Pharmacists and the 
National Association of Retail Drug- 
gists, Pumpian is also a member of the 
Drug Law Committee of the Division of 
Food, Drug and Cosmetic Law of the 
Section of Corporation, Banking and 
Business Law of the American Bar 
Association. 



UNIVERSITY 
COLLEGE 



(formerly College of 
Continuation Studies) 



Special and 
G. Allen Soger 




Capt. Furst 



Capt. Furst Begins New Career 

Captain James S. Furst, '58, has retired 
from the Marine Corps after 23 years of 
service. He and his wife will make their 
permanent home in Triangle, Virginia. 
After his graduation from Maryland, 
Captain Furst earned a master's degree 
from the American University, with 



Why 




is 



mPRvmnD s fihest conn 

Mitchell's Premium Corn tastes like 
it was just cut from the cob . . . the 
result of Mitchell's own process- 
ing that cooks and seals the 
corn in cans with- 
in the hour it is. 
pulled from the 
stalk. 




SHOE PEG 





GOLDEN 



SWEET 



— Packed by — 

F. 0. miTCHELL & BR0., Inc. 

PERRYMAN, MD. - KENNEDYVILLE, MD. 
Main Office, Perryman, Md. 

Phone Aberdeen, 621 -J 



£esuU*i(j, itude+itd- and 
abutmi o^ the 

MoMflond 

38 IfeaM. 

lustiiie niCHOison 

GUeWvolet 

OldlmoM.de 

Phil J.wiline . . . 
head o^ both ca+npanied 

Baltimore Ave. on Route 1 
Hyattsville, Md. 
WArfield 7-7200 



Career in Business 

Day & Evening Classes 
Complete Courses 

Secretarial (Medical & Legal) 

Stenographic, Junior Accounting. 

Write or Phone for Catalogue 

STRAYER COLLEGE 

18 N. Charles St. LE 9-5626 



50 



the Maryland Magazine 



distinction in the field of municipal 
administration. He has taken on new 
duties with the John Hancock Mutual 
Life Insurance Company in Washing- 
ton, D. C. In addition, Captain Furst 
plans to take an active part in the life 
of his community. 




Lt. Col. Riffe 



Attend War College 

Lt. Colonel James L. Riffe, '58, and Lt. 
Colonel Alex T. Langston, Jr., '59, are 
attending the Army War College at 
Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania. The 
school prepares selected officers for 
future assignments to top staff and com- 
mand positions in the Armed Forces 
and other key government positions. 

Capt. Henderson at Ft. Benning 

Captain George R. Henderson, '60, has 
been assigned to the Special Projects 
Branch of the U. S. Army Infantry Cen- 
ter G-3 (Plans and Operations) Section 
at Fort Benning, Georgia, after serving 
four years with the 513th Military Intel- 
ligence Group in Frankfort, Germany. 

Assignment Washington 

Major Edward M. Strobel, MSC, '57, 
was recently appointed Chief of the 
Technical Liaison Office in the Army 
Surgeon General's Office, Washington, 
D. C. 

Major Strobel has had considerable 
experience in the field of hospital admin- 
istration. From June, 1956, to June, 
1957, he was Information Officer for 
Walter Reed Army Medical Center. He 

(Continued on next page) 



J. 


H 


. De VEAU & SON, 

General Contractors 

ROADS EXCAVATION 
DRIVEWAYS BUILDINGS 
PIPE CONCRETE 
CONCRETE SAWS 


Inc. 


4100 J 


ones Bridge Road 








North Chevy Chase, Md. 



ELECTRONIC WHOLESALERS, w. 

2345 Sherman Ave., N.W. HU 3-5200 Washington, D. C. 

Specializing in all of the 
Great Brand Names in 

HIGH FIDELITY 

Visit Our Sound Room — Plenty of Free Parking 




QUAINT ACRES 
NURSERIES 



COMPLETE LINE OF 

NURSERY STOCK IN WIDE VARIETY 

LANDSCAPE SERVICE 

DORMANT SPRAYING 

TRANSPLANTING 

TREE MOVING 

PRUNING 



H. W. "Phoebe' 
Qriaintance 
Class of '27 



COLESVILLE PIKE 

(U. S. 29) 

5 MILES FROM 

GEORGIA AVENUE 

SILVER SPRING. 

MARYLAND 

MA 2-1234 



PHONE UNION 4-5100 



B. SUGRUE — PRES. 



NORMAN MOTOR COMPANY, Inc. 



SALES 



3vrd 



SERVICE 



8313 WASHINGTON-BALTIMORE BLVD. • COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



November-December , 1960 



51 



PAVING SUPPLY 

AND 
EQUIPMENT CO. 

Sales ' Rental • Service 

Construction Equipment 

MICHIGAN MICHIGAN 

Tractor Shovels Tractor Scrapers 



ESSICK 


INSLEY 


Vibratory 


Backhoes — 


Rollers 


Cranes 


OLIVER 


JOY 


Crawler 


Universal 


Bulldozers 


Scaffolding 



BALTIMORE: 

701 Bonaparte Avenue 
Telephone BEImont 5-2227 

WASHINGTON: 

10th & Girard Sts., N.E. 
Telephone DUpont 7-3700 



Jfuller. & Vmbtxt 

INCORPORATED 



SUPPLYING 
EVERY 
PHOTOGRAPHIC 

HEED 



Since 



1920 



Phone — Executive 3-8120 

815 TENTH STREET, N.W. 

WASHINGTON. D. C. 



Finer Foods Since 1858 




Washington, D. C 



Official Eating Place 
of the Alumni 

1107 Connecticut Ave 

Next to 
the Mayflower Hotel 



has held posts as Hospital Inspector 
General and as Hospital Inspector. 
From December, 1948, to June, 1952, 
he was a personnel assignment officer 
in the Army Surgeon General's Office. 

Major Strobel received a Master of 
Hospital Administration degree from 
Baylor University in August. 



Transfer to St. Louis 

Lt. Colonel Kennard S. Vandergrift, '55, 
has been assigned as Deputy Chief, 
Procurement Division, Directorate of 
Procurement and Production, Transpor- 
tation Materiel Command, St. Louis, 
Missouri. 

Colonel Vandergrift has recently re- 
turned from Bremerhaven, Germany, 
where he was Deputy Commanding Offi- 
cer for Port Operations, U. S. Army 
Port of Embarkation. 



SOCIAL NOTES 



Engaged 

Sharon L. Josephson, Ed. '60, has be- 
come engaged to Glen P. Dalton, Jr. 
The announcement was made by her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Herbert W. 
Josephson of Crestview, Maryland. 



Births 

Dr. and Mrs. Alben R. Pollack recently 
announced the birth of a son on July 
12, 1960. Dr. Pollack, D.D.S. '59, is 
serving as a Captain in the United States 
Air Force, stationed in Albany, Georgia. 
Mr. and Mrs. W. Wylie Hopkins are 
parents of a baby girl, born January 18, 
1960. Mr. Hopkins is a 1942 graduate 
of the College of Business and Public 
Administration and a 1957 graduate of 
the School of Law. 



Married 

Helen Holland, Ed. '60, married Donald 
Shankin and is living in Atlanta, 
Georgia. 

Janet Bowers, Ed. '60, is now Mrs. 
John Claggett and resides in College 
Park. 

Bill Nesline, E.E. '51, and Mrs. Nes- 
line are celebrating the arrival of Mark 
Lee on August 28th. 

Richard N. Goldstein, B.P.A. '59, was 
recently married to Miss Suzanne 



DORSET 

CONTRACTING CO., 

INC. 

4508 Hamilton St. 
AP 7-2488 Hyattsville, Md. 




Thomas E. Carroll 
& Son 

LANDSCAPE CONTRACTING 
Tree Moving 



Trees 
Sodding 



Shrubs 
Grading 



EVergreen 4-6400 

15710 Coles villo Road 

SILVER SPRING. MARYLAND 



Baltimore Photo & Blue Print Co. 

211 E. Baltimore St. 
Baltimore 2, Md. 

Photostats — Blue Prints 

Tracing Reproductions on 

Linen, Vellum, Film and 

Autopositives 

Photographic Murals 

Laminating 

PHOTOGRAPHY 



Bon Ton 
POTATO CHIPS 

distributed by 
BON TON FOOD PRODUCTS 

801 Franklin St., N.E. 
HU 3-4232 Washington 




S. A. FREAS & CO. 

Fruits and Produce 

1338 5th St. N.E. 
Washington, D. C. 



52 



the Maryland Magazine 



Lipschutz. Both Mr. and Mrs. Goldstein 
are natives of Philadelphia. 

Jim Kenkel, A.&S. '55, was married 
last June to Miss Janice J. Duvall of 
Winchester, Virginia. Mr. Kenkel is 
attending the Georgetown University 
Law School. The couple make their 
home in Hyattsville. 




Mrs. Jacobson 



Herbert Jacobson, A.&S. '59, recently 
took as his wife Miss Brenda Siegel. 
Mrs. Jacobson is the daughter of Dr. 
Sydney L. Siegel, M.E. '32, and Mrs. 
Siegel. She is presently in her senior 
year at the University, studying micro- 
biology. 

Judith Eberts, Ed. '59, and Rand W. 
Tuttle, Eng. '59, were married in Au- 
gust. Mr. Tuttle is attending the Har- 
vard Graduate School of Business 
Administration and teaching in Arling- 
ton, Massachusetts. 



COMPLETED 
CAREERS 

Dr. E. H. Doble 

Dr. E. H. Doble, M.D. '00, died recently 
in a hospital near his home at Presque 
Isle, Maine. He had practiced medicine 
there for 60 years and was a pioneer in 
X-ray therapy. With two other doctors, 
he had introduced X-ray treatment in 
New England in 1903. Active in civic 
affairs, Dr. Doble was a past president 
of the Presque Isle Rotary Club and was 
instrumental in the establishment of the 
first airport there. 

{Continued on next page) 



BARBER & ROSS CO. 

EST. 1876 

2323 - 4th St. N. E. Washington, D. C 

DEcatur 2-0501 



FREE DELIVERY 



FREE PARKING 



SUPPLIER & DISTRIBUTOR OF THESE MAJOR ITEMS 

Builders Hardware — Power Tools — Package Homes 

Major Appliances — Structural Steel — Lumber 

Jalousie Doors — Aluminum Windows — Millwork 

Paint — General Hardware — Kitchen Cabinets 

Metal Bucks & Doors 





Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co. 
Silver Hill Concrete Co. 






Phone 

for 

CONCRETE 

RE 

5-3000 


Producers and Distributors of 

WASHED SAND & GRAVEL 
TOP SOIL • ROAD GRAVEL 
READY-MIXED CONCRETE 


Phone 

for 

SAND & 

GRAVEL 

RE 
5-3000 








WASHINGTON 20, D.C. 







FRANCIS e* PARSONS, Inc. 

Exclusive S. E. Dodge, Dart and Lancer Dealer 
Dodge Job Rated Trucks 

SALES & SERVICE 
GUARANTEED USED CARS 

2100 NICHOLS AVE., S.E. — ANACOSTIA, D. C. 

"We're Easy to Deal With" 

LU 4-7400 Used Cars — LU 4-2880 



TH0MSS0N STEEL CO., Inc. 

5106 Baltimore Avenue 
HYATTSVILLE. MD. AP 7-3201 



November-December, 1960 



53 



THE 

NATIONAL BANK 
OF CAMBRIDGE 

Complete 
Banking Service 

Organized 1880 

SAFETY DEPOSIT 
DEPARTMENT 

Cambridge, Maryland 



PLANTATION 



ANGUS BULLS 

IMPORTERS - EXPORTERS - 
BREEDERS, of 
Scotch, and Irish Aberdeen-Angus 
Performance Attested Bulls for Sale 
Request Folder, Data Sheets, Prices 
Address: James B. Lingle, Manager 

(Telephone: TAylor 7-2041) 



WYE PLANTATION, Queenstou/n,Md. 



Salisbury Milling Co. 

Incorporated 

Salisbury's Best 

Broiler - Laying - Hog 

FEEDS 

Corn Goods - Eshelman Feeds 

Salisbury, Md. 



BANK OF CRISFIELD 

Dependable Service Since 1893 

MARION BRANCH— Phone 2381 

UPTOWN BRANCH— Phone 312 

MAIN OFFICE— Phone 102 

Member Federal Deposit Ins. Corp. 



u 



The COHN & BOCK CO. 

Lumber • Building Material 

poultry FEEDS livestock 

PRINCESS ANNE. MARYLAND 



He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Edna 
P. Doble, a son, Dr. Howard R. Doble, 
of Baltimore, a brother, a sister, three 
grandchildren and five great grand- 
children. 



**v««* 



/_\ 




Dr. Murray 
Dr. Francis A. G. Murray 

Dr. Francis Alan Gordon Murray, M.D. 
'97, died recently at his home in Cum- 
berland, Maryland, after a long illness. 
He had practiced medicine in western 
Maryland for 60 years. He had main- 
tained his office in Cumberland for 34 
years. 

Dr. Murray began the practice of 
medicine in 1899 in Allegany County. 
He joined the United States Army in 
1917 at the outbreak of World War I. 
In 1919 he returned to western Mary- 
land, taking up residence in Cumber- 
land. In his many years of practice, Dr. 
Murray delivered 5,400 babies and per- 
formed more than 30,000 operations. 
A pioneer in thyroid surgery, he had the 
reputation of being the best surgeon in 
western Maryland in that field. 

Dr. Murray's illustrious English an- 
cestry caused him to be related to Queen 
Elizabeth II of England — a third cousin 
once removed. Proud of his heritage, 
Dr. Murray maintained a collection of 
engraved and painted portraits of his 
forebears, to whom he drank a toast 
each New Year's Eve. His daughter, 
Nancy, represented the family at the 
Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II. 

Active in civic affairs, Dr. Murray 
was known as a friend to the unfor- 
tunate. One of his patients remembered 
that he served the community at a dol- 
lar per month per family and in addition 
furnished his own medicine. 

In addition to his membership in the 
Allegany-Garrett County Medical Soci- 
ety, Dr. Murray was a member of the 



VICTOR 

CUSHWA 

& SONS 

Manufacturers of 

"CALVERT" 

COLONIAL FACE 

BRICK 

Main Office and Plant 

WILLIAMSPORT, MD. 

Office and Warehouse 

137 INGRAHAM ST., N.E. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Sales Representatives in 
Principal Eastern Cities 



CITIZENS 

NATIONAL 

BANK 

Member Federal Deposit 
Insurance Corporation 

A Federal Reserve Bank 

POCOMOKE CITY 
MARYLAND 



CREOSOTED 
PRODUCTS 

— Telephones — 

PI 2-2144— PI 2-2145 

P.O. Box 312 

SALISBURY, MARYLAND 



SWEETHEART 

Enriched Bread 

IT'S DELICIOUS 

SALISBURY, MARYLAND 



J. L WELLS 



Carina ~J~4ill 
PRIVATE SANITARIUM 

SALISBURY, MARYLAND 

TELEPHONE PI 9-5594 



...................I 



54 



the Maryland Magazine 



American Legion, the Veterans of For- 
eign Wars, and the Woodmen of the 
World of Mt. Savage. Dr. Murray was 
a member of the Emmanuel Episcopal 
Church. 

He is survived by his wife, Gertrude 
A. Murray, and two daughters, Mrs. 
Albert Tase and Miss Elizabeth Ann 
Murray. Dr. Murray is also survived by 
the three sons of his first marriage, 
Gordon M., C. Walter, and Gerard A. 
Murray, and a daughter, Mrs. Mabel 
M. Allen. Also surviving arc three 
brothers, one sister, seven grandchildren 
and four great grandchildren. 

Richard P. Whiteley 

Richard P. Whiteley, '98, died recently 
in Doctors Hospital, Washington, D. C. 

Mr. Whiteley served in the Spanish- 
American War following his graduation 
from Maryland Agricultural College. He 
subsequently took an A.B. degree at 
George Washington University and an 
LL.B. degree at Georgetown Law 
School. 

Mr. Whiteley joined the Federal Trade 
Commission in 1924 as an assistant 
chief counsel. He served the FTC 28 
years, retiring in 1953. 

A Democrat, Mr. Whiteley served as 
a member of the Maryland House of 
Delegates in 1912. 

Mr. Whiteley is survived by a son, 
Robert F. S. Whiteley, a daughter, Mrs. 
Robert W. Parker, and five grandchil- 
dren. His wife, Mary, died last March. 

Dr. A. B. Lyon 

Dr. A. B. Lyon, M.D. '05, died at his 
home in Ulster, Pennsylvania, recently 
after a long illness. He was described by 
his home town newspaper as one of the 
last surviving "country doctors" in the 
area. 

Dr. Lyon began his practice in Ulster 
in 1906. In 1956 he celebrated his 50th 
anniversary of practice in Ulster — a 
celebration which brought him honor 
from the community he served for so 
long. 

Dr. Lyon was a member of the 
Masons and served as Chairman of the 
School Board for 18 years. 

Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Mary 
McPherson Lyon, and one niece, Mrs. 
Lewis J. Carling of Bronxville, New 
York. 

Other Deaths 

Dr. Dorsey W. Lewis passed away re- 
cently. Dr. Lewis had practiced medi- 
cine for 64 years. 

Dr. William A. Ryon died recently 
at the Washington Sanitarium, Takoma 
Park, Md. He had practiced medicine 
in Washington, D. C. for more than 
30 years. 

Arthur B. Gahan, Ag. '07, passed 
away recently. 



C. 0. OlIPHANT & SON, INC. 



KSTAKUSIIKI) L921 



ROOFING and SHEET METAL CONTRACTORS 



Heating • Ventilating • Air Conditioning 

'BARRETT'' • BONDED ROOFERS 



Telephone: IK 5-7581 



I \i kl.l., DELAWARE 



jbelicioui 




BAKED TO 

STAY FRESH 

LONGER 



STAR BAKING COMPANY, Crisfield, Md. 



Season's Greetings 



From 



THE WORCESTER FERTILIZER COMPANY 

SNOW HILL. MD. 

Serving The Farm Since 1913 
The Shore's Finest Fertilizer 



Spacious 
peninsula 


WATERFRONT ESTATE 

iir conditioned brick home in Bailey's Neck section of Talbot C 
offering broad water with sandy beach as well as deep water 


aunty. 16 acres 
and protected 


across 
harbor. 




MARYLAND-VIRGINIA REALTY CO. 


, INC. 




123 N. 


Washington St. Realtors 


EASTON, 


MD. 



Anchor Fence 

Anchor Post Products, Inc. 

1317 Half St., S.E. 

Lincoln 3-8151 

Virginia residents JEfferson 4-1110 

Northwest and suburban LOckwood 5-3556 

Baltimore MEdford 3-6500 

Towson VAIley 5-7133 

Glen Burnie SOuthfield 1-0550 

Annapolis COIonial 8-3451 

OFFICES: 

THE DISTRICT, VIRGINIA, 

MARYLAND 



THE 



LORD CALVERT 
HOTEL AND COTTAGES 

Ljour ^Triencilii ^rrosts 

Just eight miles from Washington, 
near the University of Maryland, 
you'll find complete comfort and 
conveniences. 

Phone AP 7-4493 

For Reservations 

Free TV — Free Parking 

On U. S. Highwav No. 1 
7200 BALTIMORE AVENUE 
COLLEGE PARK. MI). 



November-December, 1960 



55 



Acme Iron Works 48 

Advertisers Engraving Co 38 

Advertisers Mat Service 43 

Alcazar 44 

American Disinfectant Company 38 

Anchor Post Products Co., Inc 55 

Aristocrat Linen Supply Co., Inc 38 

Arnold's Village Shop 28 

Arundel Federal Savings & Loan Assn 41 

The Asphalt Service Co 26 

Atchison & Keller, Inc 34 

Avignone Freres Caterers 36 

B & B Exterminators, Inc 26 

Baltimore Business Forms, Inc 34 

Baltimore Check Room Service 33 

Baltimore Envelope Co 27 

Baltimore Photo & Blue Print Co 52 

Baltimore Stage Curtain Co 26 

Bank of Crisfield 54 

Barber & Ross Hardware, Inc 53 

Bard- Avon School 31 

C. J. Benson Furniture Co 36 

Bergmann's Laundry 41 

Bethesda Cinder Block Mfg. Co., Inc 46 

Blackie's House of Beef 44 

Bon Ton Food Products 52 

Harry A. Boswell Co 38 

Brentwood Inn 48 

Briggs Construction Co., Inc 41 

Briggs Meat Product Co 50 

Thomas E. Carroll & Son 52 

D. Harry Chambers, Opticians 31 

Citizens National Bank 54 

Thomas E. Clark, Inc 33 

Cohn & Bock Co 54 

Cokesbury Book Store 42 

Colson-Merriam Co 38 

Commercial Envelope Co 49 

A. Myron Cowell Co 49 

Crosse & Blackwell Co 21 

Crusty Pie Company 46 

Victor Cushwa & Sons 54 

Danny's Formal Wear 40 

Davidson's Transfer & Storage Co 31 

F. A. Davis & Sons 36 

D. C. Ignition Headquarters, Inc 47 

Del-Haven White House Motel 40 

J. H. DeVeau & Sons, Inc 51 

Dietrich & Gambrill, Inc 37 

Dietrich Bros., Inc 25 

Dorset Contracting Co., Inc 52 

Eastern Overall Co 36 

Electronic Wholesalers, Inc 51 

Evans & Van Cleeff, Inc 44 

Farmer's Cooperative Association 37 

J. H. Filbert, Inc 36 

First Federal Savings & Loan Association . . 34 

Foreign Motors, Ltd 31 

Francis & Parsons 53 

Fraternity Federal Savings & Loan Association 26 

S. A. Freas & Co 52 

Frederick Construction Co 37 

Frederick Underwriters, Inc 37 

Fuller & d'Albert, Inc 52 



Directory of Advertisers 



German Airlines 22 

Gray Concrete Pipe Co 42 

The Handy Line (Paul M. Adams) 34 

Hannes Formal Wear 33 

Harrington Hotel 39 

Harvey Dairy, Inc 40 

Harvey's Restaurant 52 

Hendler's Ice Cream Co 36 

Hilkrest, Florists 45 

Huffer-Shinn Optical Co 41 

In Town Motor Hotels 25 

Johnston, Lemon & Co 47 

Kidwell & Kidwell, Inc 45 

King Bros., Inc., Printing 32 

E. H. Koester Bakery Co 32 

Krispy Kreme Doughnut Co 46 

J. Langrall & Bro., Inc 44 

Maurice Leeser Co 42 

A Little Bit of Norway In Maryland 31 

Lord Baltimore Hotel 32 

Lord Calvert Hotel 55 

Lustine-Nicholson Chevrolet 50 

Maria's Restaurant 26 

Maryland Hotel Supply Co 48 

Maryland-Virginia Realty Co., Inc 55 

Massey-Ferguson 35 

Clifton D. Mayhew, Inc 46 

F. O. Mitchell & Bro., Inc 50 

Modern Machinist Co 40 

Modern Stationery Co 26 

Murray Hardware Co 46 

The Music Box 46 

McCormick Asbestos Co 26 

McLeod & Romborg Stone Co., Inc. 35 

National Bank of Cambridge 54 

National Equipment & Supply Co 39 

New China Inn 38 

Norman Motor Co 51 

Normandy Farms 43 

North Washington Press 39 

Northrop Aircraft, Inc Outside back cover 

Occidental Restaurant 30 

C. C. Oliphant & Son, Inc 55 

Oles Envelope Corp 33 

Olney Inn 42 

Olsen Equipment Co 35 

Ottenberg's Bakers, Inc. 47 

Palmer-Ford, Inc 23 

Palmer-Mercury, Inc 23 

Park Transfer Co 48 

Paving Supply & Equipment Co 52 

Peabody Conservatory of Music 25 

Penn Hotel 50 

Perpetual Building Association Inside front cover 

R. B. Phelps Stone Co 45 

Poor, Bowen, Bartlett & Kennedy, Inc 45 

Jimmie Porter (T/A Kiernan's) 45 

Potomac Butter Co 48 



Quaint Acres Nursery 51 

Refrigeration Supply Co 39 

Restorff Motors 44 

Rex Engraving Co., Inc 45 

Ridgeville Nurseries 37 

Katherine Robb Nursing Home 39 

Roma Restaurant 36 

Rose Exterminator Co 34 

Safeway Trails 24 

Salisbury Milling Co 54 

Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 38 

Schofield Co., Inc 28 

Schluderberg-Kurdle Co 32 

W. M. Schoenf elder & Associates 27 

Sealtest Foods 39 

Sears, Roebuck & Co 33 

Seidenspinner, Realtor 39 

The Shade Shop 40 

Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co 53 

Silver Spring Building Supply Co 47 

A. W. Sisk & Co 32 

Russell W. Smith, Insurance 42 

Smith's Book Store 32 

Smith Welding Co 43 

Southcomb, Inc 30 

Southern Farms 29 

Southern Plate Glass Co 35 

Spring Hill Sanitarium 54 

Standard Duplicating Machines Agency 42 

Star Baking Co 55 

Wm. P. Stein, Inc 29 

Sterling Lighting Co 26 

Sterling Process (Bookbinders) 44 

Steuart Petroleum Company 43 

Strayer College 50 

Students Supply Store 40 

Suburban Trust Co 48 

Mano Swartz, Furs 28 

Sweetheart Bakers 54 

Thomas & Thompson Co 36 

Thompson Furniture Co 44 

Thomsson Steel Co 53 

Town Hall Tavern 39 

Vermont Federal Savings & Loan Assn 38 

Wallop & Son, Insurance 23 

Warner's Men's Wear 29 

Washington Coca Cola Bottling Works 27 

Washington Wholesale Drug Exchange, Inc. . . 43 

J. I. Wells Co., Inc 54 

Western Exterminating Co., Inc. 34 

Westinghouse Electric Corp 20 

White Rice Inn 40 

Perry O. Wilkinson Insurance 44 

Williams Construction Co 27 

Carl J. Williams & Sons 49 

J. McKenny Willis 43 

Worcester Fertilizer Co 55 

World Wide Travel Service 50 

Wye Plantation 54 

York Building Products Co., Inc 41 

York Wholesalers, Inc 49 

Duke Zeibert's Restaurant 44 



56 



the Maryland Magazine 



Jilerrp Cf)ri£tmas 

anb a 

J|appj> J2eto $car 

jf rom tfjc Campus of tfje 

UmuerSttp of iWarplanb 

to 

gUumm ilrtenbsi &rounb tfje <£Hobe 



This is a season of remembering, of hope and of prayer. A time of joy 
and praise. With thanks to each and best wishes to all, we say with 
new fervor those few meaningful words to you and all you hold dear. 




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Northrop is an analog for progress where engineers 
— and ideas — grow to reach their maximum poten- 
tial. It takes a lot of engineer to measure up to 
Northrop's creative engineering challenges. 

To convert our sophisticated requirements into 
producible and reliable systems calls for intellectual 
stature, disciplined imagination, and an explorer's 
venturesome curiosity. 



Northrop is rich in advanced projects to grow on. 
If you want to associate yourself with an organiza- 
tion that is producing tomorrow's technological 
headlines today, stand up and be measured. Send us 
^fcard or letter today with your name, address, and 
area of special interest. 

NORTHROP CORPORATION, P.O. BOX 1525, BEVERLY HILLS, CALIF. 

DIVISIONS: NORAIR / RADIOPLANE / NORTRONICS 












Publication of the University of Maryland 



ma^; izine 




■I MB^HMK 

Volume XXXII Number Two • January - February 1961 



The Problem of Berlin • The Maryland Line. C.S.A. • Lecturi Halls Dedicated 



Far in the 




Bell Telephone engineers are putting 
together the nervous system for BMEWS 
. . . Ballistic Missile Early Warning System 



The eyes of the U. S. Air Force BMEWS will 
be massive, far-seeing radars in Alaska, Green- 
land and Great Britain. The brain is at the Conti- 
nental Air Defense Center in Colorado Springs. 
Between eyes and brain there will be a vast network 
to provide instantaneous, highly reliable commu- 
nications in the event of enemy missile attack. 

The Bell System's manufacturing and supply 
unit, Western Electric, heads a team of 30 pri- 
vate firms and government agencies from three 
countries which is constructing this communica- 
tions system. 

Work is going ahead at full speed, right on 
schedule. All of the arts of long distance communi- 



cations are being used to conquer the stern, hard- 
bitten terrain of BMEWS— line-of-sight and over- 
the-horizon radio, cables on land and under water. 

Several forms of transmission are being em- 
ployed. Newly designed high-speed data channels 
will feed information to computers. Voice and 
teletypewriter links will also be available. 

One important reason the Bell System was 
given this assignment was its demonstrated capac- 
ity to handle such a challenging task. The re- 
sourcefulness and skill shown in this and other 
defense projects are also responsible for the effi- 
cient, continually improving telephone service you 
enjoy every day. 



m\ BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM 




■ 





The Cover: This is ;i view from the top of the neu two-Story-high nu- 
clear reactor, dedicated to use January 25. The reaetoi is a pool type and 
is cooled and moderated by light water. If you look carefully at the area 
immediately below the research scientist, you will see his reflection mirrored 
by the water which tills this cyclindrica'l section. I Ik Maryland reactOI 
was authorized by the Atomic Energy Commission and was financed bj 
AEC grants totaling more than $180,000. The 10 kilowatt facility is the 
first major critical reactor in the State. PHOTOGRAPH in Ai Dnmoci i< 



the 




JANUARY FEBRUARY 






magazine 

Volume XXXII 



Number 2 



Alumni Publication of 

the University of Maryland 

BOARD OF REGENTS 



CHARLES P. McCORMICK, Chairman 
EDWARD F. HOLTER, Vice-Chairman 

B. HERBERT BROWN, Secretary 
HARRY H. NUTTLE, Treasurer 
LOUIS L. KAPLAN, Assistant Secretary 

C. EWING TUTTLE, Assistant Treasurer 
RICHARD W. CASE 

THOMAS W. PANGBORN 
THOMAS B. SYMONS 
WILLIAM C. WALSH 
MRS. JOHN L. WHITEHURST 



DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 
President of the University 



OFFICE OFUNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
ROBERT J. McCARTNEY, Director 



ROBERT H. BREUNIG, Editor 

SHELBY DAVIS WEINGARTEN, Assistant Editor 

JOSEPH F. BLAIR, Sports Editor 

AL DANEGGER, Staff Photographer 



OFFICE OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 
C. WILBUR CISSEL, Director 



OFFICE RS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
MRS. ELIZABETH ROHR SINGLETON, '47, President 
DR. WILLIAM H. TRIPLETT, "11, Vice-President 
DR. REGINALD V. TRUITT, '14, Vice-Pres.dent 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, '38, Executive Secretary 
VICTOR HOLM, '57, Assistant Secretary 



OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELATIONS 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, Director 

ADVERTISING DIRECTO R 

SALLY L. OGDEN 
18 W. 25th Street 2500 Wise. Ave., N. W. 
Baltimore 18 Md. Washington, D C. 

(HO 7-9018) (FE 7-2113) 



In This Issue — 






FEATURES 






2 


The Alumni Diary 




3 


Alumni and Campus Notes 




7 


Dean Stamp Retires 




8 


Sergeant Reeder, The Maryland Line, C.S.A. 




11 


Drake Lecture Halls are Dedicated 




12 


Berlin: where Democracy Struggles for Survival 




14 


Do you Remember? 




15 


Maryland Books and Authors 




16 


University Sports 




NEWS FROM THE SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 






16 


Agriculture 




17 


Arts and Sciences 




18 


Business and Public Administration 




19 


Dentistry 




19 


Education 




25 


Engineering 




31 


Home Economics 




32 


Medicine 




38 


Physical Education, Recreation and Health 




40 


University College 




41 


Social Notes 




42 


Completed Careers 






Published Bi-Monthly at the University of Maryland, and entered at the Post Office 






College Park. Md. as second class mail matter under the Act of Congress of March 3, 






1379, — $3.00 per year — Fifty cents the copy — Member of American Alumni Council. 





The General Alumni Council 

school and college 
represent a 77 ves : 

A G R I ' 

H. M. Carroll, '20 
Paul M. Galbreath, '39 
Howard L. Stier, '32 

AITS* SCIENCES 

Charles F. Ellinger, 37 

John L. Lampe, '50 

Dr. Reginald V. Truitt, '14 

BUSINESS & PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

Thomas E. Bourne, Jr., '43 
Ralph W. Frey, Jr., '41 
Chester W. Tawney, '31 

DENTISTRY 

Dr. Samuel Bryant, 32 
Dr. Harry Levin, '26 
Dr. Edward D. Stone, '25 

EDUCATION 

Clara Dixon, '34 
Harry Hasslinger, '33 
Loren Lee Lindley, '48 

ENGINEERING 

Emmett Loane, '29 
Robert J. McLeod, '37 
John E. Waldo, '57 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Mrs. Erna R. Chapman, '34 
Mrs. Ruth T. Clarke, '42 
Mrs. Jane M. West, '40 

Emory H. Niles, '17 
Layman J. Redden, '34 
G. Kenneth Reiblich, '29 

MEDICINE 

Dr. Thurston R. Adams, 34 
Dr. Daniel J. Pessagno, '20 
Dr. William H. Triplett, '11 

NURSING 

Mrs. E. Elizabeth R. Hipp, '29 
Mrs. Norma S. Long, '49 
Mrs. Elizabeth R. Singleton, '47 

PHARMACY 

Hyman Davidov, '20 
Samuel I. Raichlen, '25 
Frank J. Slama, '24 



EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS: 
Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 

President of the University 
David L. Brigham, '38 

Secretary-Treasurer 
Victor Holm, '57, Ass't Secretary 
Harry A. Boswell, Jr., '42, Past President 
Frank Block, '24, Past President 
Joseph H. Deckman, '31, Past President 
J. Gilbert Prendergast, '33, Past President 
J. Homer Remsberg, '18, Past President 
Col. O. H. Saunders, '10, Past President 
Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, '12 

Past President 
T. T. Speer, '17, Past President 
C. V. Koons, '29, Past President 
Dr. Arthur I. Bell, '19, Past President 

• 
ALUMNI CLUB REPRESENTATIVES : 
Baltimore — Mrs. Ethel M. Troy, '17 
Carroll County — 

Dr. Lawrence L. Leggett, '30 
Cecil County— Dr. Fred S. Fink, '56 
Cumberland — Reford Aldridge, '25 
Eastern Shore — Otis Twilley, '21 
Frederick County — 

James F. Zimmerman, '37 
"M" Club — George Knepley, '38 
Montgomery County — 

Robert W. Beall, '31 
New England — George Kerlejza, '25 
New York — Harold McGay, '50 
North Eastern Shore — 

Robert W. Downes, Jr., '46 
Overseas— Col. Ralph I. Williams, '33, '41 
Pittsburgh — Dr. Joseph Finegold, '34 
Prince Georges County — 

Egbert F. Tingley, '27 
Richmond — Paul Mullinix, '36 
Schenectady — Mrs. Janice Mackey, '51 
Terrapin — James W. Stevens, '19 
U. S. Dept. of Agriculture — 

William H. Evans, '26 
Washington County — 

C. Scott Couchman, '51 



THE 




LUMNI DIARY 



A WISE EXPRESSION CAME MY WAY RECENTLY WHEN A FRIEND SAID, '*IF YOU 
have an idea, express it quickly before it dies of lonesomeness." From where 
I sit and the roads I travel, such thoughts abound in almost overwhelming quan- 
tity. Some gems are implanted by repetition while others stick because they 
startle. Many more are held for a few moments and then released for the minds 
of others to ponder or destroy. 

Gleaned recently from the ever plentiful verbal, written and visual com- 
munications, were comments on the subject of education. These I felt compelled 
to pass along, for like you, I have heard again and again the well founded con- 
cerns about "The Closing College Door." Let me hasten to reassure you! The 
doors of the University of Maryland are swinging ever wider and the challenge 
of the next decade and the next century, whatever it may be, will be met. 

First, from President Fawcett of Ohio State University, who says, "Over 
the ages, universities have survived war, famine, pestilence, and death. In other 
lands, libraries have been burned by fanatics; whole faculties have perished; 
buildings have been reduced to rubble. But because of their usefulness, these 
institutions have lived and multiplied." 

Second, Roy E. Larsen, who is Chairman of the Executive Committee for 
Time, Inc., advises, "All true communication is education, and all education 
is necessarily the consequence of communication." He adds, "We have an over- 
whelming responsibility to ourselves and to mankind — the responsibility to edu- 
cate and to communicate farther, better and deeper then we ever have before." 

Just as Virginia had to be reassured with the now immortal, "Yes, Virginia, 
there is a Santa Claus," so we must be lifted from normal concerns about the 
ever growing necessity for more facilities and more faculty for many more 
minds that cannot and must not be denied. 

Few are those who can truthfully say they are satisfied. We have had the 
opportunity which a formal education affords. Now that we have learned that 
the learning process never ends, we crave the same opening door for our chil- 
dren and their children. Our restless urge and our impatient desire is to intensify 
our effort to give them the best — no matter the price or the sacrifice. 

Is this not the major motivating and driving force behind the average alumnus? 
Certainly, it must be the prime mover for all educators and those fortunate 
enough to closely observe the growth of young minds! You cannot take lightly 
the great University experience of receiving from trained minds, the accumu- 
lated knowledge of the centuries. 

No, the college doors are not closing! Our comfort, our growth, and 
our very survival are the stakes. If we won't give this guarantee for others, we 
will for ourselves. 

Alumnus Seymour Ruff tells us why in a new publication called, Better Self, 
when he quotes from an unknown author as follows: 

We are all blind until we see, Why build these cities glorious. 

That in the Human plan; If man unbuilded goes; 

Nothing is worth the making In vain we build our work. 

That does not make the man. Unless the Builder also grows. 

As ever, 




tfht£_^ 



David L. Brigham 

Alumni Secretary 



1 



the Maryland Magazine 




FEBRUARY 



UNIVERSITY 

11 



CALENDAR OF ACTIVITIES 



2 Basketball — North Carolina — 
Away 

4 Basketball — Wake Forest — Away 
6 Professional Basketball — Los An- 
geles Lakers vs. Cincinnati Royals 
at College Park 
10 Basketball — Clemson — Away 



BPA Building Near Ready 

The new building to house the College 
of Business and Public Administration 
is nearing completion and occupancy 
is expected at the end of the fall se- 
mester, according to Dr. J. Freeman 
Pyle, Dean of the College. 

Constructed at a cost of $1,575,000 
(not including equipment), the building 
has five floors with approximately 90,- 
000 gross square feet. A total of 34 
classrooms, laboratories and conference 
rooms; and a large lecture hall to seat 
430 persons have been provided. In ad- 
dition, office suites for the Dean and 
eight departments of this College will 
be housed in the new facility. Each 
professor will have an individual office. 

A chilled water type of air condition- 
ing which permits independent control 
of space is also included. Provision has 
been made in the design for a very mod- 
ern lighting system to provide increased 
illumination. 

Facilities for the Department of Office 
Techniques and Management, which 
will be located on the ground floor, will 
include a conference room, an office 
machine classroom, a punch card and 
electronic computing classroom, and an 
accounting and reproducing classroom. 

Sixteen general classrooms, a labora- 
tory and a seminar room will be located 
on the first floor. 



13 

18 

22 



Basketball — South Carolina — 
Away 

Basketball— N. C. State— Away 

Basketball — George Washington 
— Away 

Basketball — Virginia at College 
Park 



25 



Basketball- 
Park 



lemson ;il ( ollege 



MARCH 

2-4 Basketball — Atlantic Coast Con- 
ference Tournament — Raleigh. 
North Carolina 

7-11 U. T. Production — "Julius Cae- 
sar" — College Park 




Administrative offices of the Dean 
and the Assistant Dean of the College, 
together with a conference room, gen- 
eral office and reception room will be 
housed on the second floor. 

The second floor will also house 12 
faculty offices of the Department of 
Geography, four classrooms and two 
laboratories; and conference, seminar, 
cartography, map mounting, map stor- 
age, wall map storage and dark rooms. 

Facilities on the third floor of the 
new building will include 69 offices for 
faculty of the Departments of Business 
Organization, Economics, and Govern- 
ment and Politics; and three conference 
rooms. 



Twenty-one offices have been pro- 
vided on the fourth floor for the Bureau 
of Business and Economic Research. Bu- 
reau of Governmental Research. Mary- 
land Municipal League and the State 
Association of County Commissioners. 
In addition, provision has been made for 
two reference and research rooms, a 
conference room and laboratories. 

The building will be serviced by ele- 
vator. A number of the classrooms have 
been equipped for closed circuit tele- 
vision. 

"One of the most modern classroom 
buildings of its kind." was the descrip- 
tion Dr. Pyle gave of the new building. 



January-February, 1961 




Mr. Gottwals 



National Award to Gottwals 

Abram Gottwals, Agri. '38, Agricultural 
and Public Relations Representative of 
the First National Bank of Southern 
Maryland received a 4-H alumni recog- 
nition plaque at the National 4-H Club 
Congress in Chicago as one of eight 
persons from across the nation named 
for this honor. 

A former 4-H Club member in Caro- 
line County, Mr. Gottwals has con- 
tinued his interest in and support of 
the 4-H Club program. He helped or- 
ganize and served as vice chairman of 
the first Maryland 4-H Club Foundation 
and campaigned for its support among 
Maryland bankers. He served as chief 
of the Maryland 4-H All Stars and 
assisted at State 4-H Club Conservation 
Camp. 

Working closely with the 4-H Club 
program in Prince Georges County, 
Gottwals has participated in officers 
training, obtained scholarships for 4-H 
youth, established awards for outstand- 
ing exhibits at the county fair and was 
instrumental in obtaining a polaroid 
camera for county use. 

Mr. Gottwals is a promoter of Mary- 
land agriculture in his professional and 
civic leadership and responsibilities. He's 
a member of the University of Maryland 
Alumni Council; Board of Directors of 
the Agricultural Alumni Association; 
University of Maryland Director of the 
Maryland Tobacco Improvement Foun- 
dation. 



You May Be One of Fifty 

Keeping with the theme of growth, 
Expression, the University literary mag- 
azine, is instituting two programs of in- 
terest to alumni. Both undertakings 
concern the limited distribution of Ex- 
pression off campus. 

Although Expression is the "infant" 
publication in terms of age, the repeated 
quality of work published has made 
the magazine one of the finest University 
publications. 

From a mimeographed sheet to an 
abundantly illustrated, forty page mag- 
azine in just four years indicates its 
growth. 

A newly instituted editorial policy 
this year is placing more emphasis on 
artistic expression as well as literary. 
In addition to short stories, plays and 
poetry, the magazine plans to print orig- 
inal art work for the sake of art. In 
the past art was used only for illustrating 
manuscripts. The new policy makes Ex- 
pression unique among university liter- 
ary magazines. 

The object of the off-campus dis- 
tribution is to acquaint people who are 
interested in the University with the 
magazine. 

Fifty names have been selected from 
subscribers of The Maryland Maga- 
zine. The winter edition of Expression 



will be mailed to them the last of Jan- 
uary in an effort to get their comments 
and reactions. 

Although this represents only a small 
part of the alumni public, the staff feels 
it is a step in the right direction. At 
the present time the number of maga- 
zines available are limited, even on 
campus. 

The other project is to distribute 
copies of the magazine to fifty Mary- 
land high schools. The magazine main- 
tains an exchange program with other 
universities but this program is being 
initiated to, not only create interest in 
Expression, but to let students know 
the cultural advantages offered at the 
University. 

Keep an eye on your mailbox. You 
may be one of the fifty! 



PR Students Promote 
Maryland Room 

Five undergraduate students from the 
Journalism-Public Relations department 
have undertaken a program of promot- 
ing the University's Maryland Room in 
an effort to add to its collection of his- 
torical documents. 

The project, labeled "Maryland Herit- 
age," is organized to reach residents 




Support Your 
Alumni Association 



PHOTO BY E. THOMAS STARCHER 

julie Harris becomes a terp. In ceremonies at the National Theatre November 26, 
Miss Julie Harris became the first honorary member of the University of Maryland 
Drama Wing. Drama Wing members participating in the presentation are, left to right, 
Mary Jane Bailey, Linda Miller, (Miss Harris), Peggy Ford, and Jacqnelyn Crews. Miss 
Crews is shown presenting the Drama Wing pin to Miss Harris. Starring in "Little Moon 
of Alban," Julie Harris will open at the Longacre Theatre on Broadway, December 1. 



4 



the Maryland Magazine 



on a state-wide basis through news- 
papers, magazines, radio, television and 
direct mail to civic organizations. 

The Maryland Room in the new Mc- 
Keldin Library is dedicated to the col- 
lection and preservation of historical 
material on the University and the state. 

While the materials have already in- 
creased, the student group felt that it 
more people were aware of the Mary- 
land Room, its purpose and goal that 
the collection would grow more rapidly. 

As Mrs. Harold Hayes, librarian of 
the Rare Books Department, pointed 
out, many people have valuable items 
laying around gathering dust or stored 
away in attics. Many items, at first 
thought, may not be recognized as re- 
search tools, valuable to students with 
a serious interest in Maryland history. 

The Maryland Room has two fields 
of interest — the University and the state. 

In the University area, the Depart- 
ment is particularly interested in obtain- 
ing yearbooks, campus publications, 
diaries, photographs, catalogs, books by 
the faculty members, programs and let- 
ters that will make a more compre- 
hensive collection. 

Maps, periodicals, books, Maryland 
periodicals, pictures, court records, land 
grants, letters, bills of sale, receipts, old 
money and documents on the state are 
also needed. 

With success, the Maryland Room 
will offer an invaluable collection of 
Maryland history to students. The col- 
lection is now and will be available to 
anyone who is doing serious research 
work on Maryland history. But the suc- 
cess depends on contributions by Mary- 
land residents. 

If anyone has items of value for the 
Maryland collection, either Howard 
Rovelstad, Director of Libraries of the 
University of Maryland, or Mrs. Hayes, 
would be pleased to see the materials. 

The student group needs the alumni 
support to make the "Maryland Herit- 
age" program a success. Search your 
home for items and send them to: 

"Maryland Heritage" 
McKeldin Library 
University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland. 

Kaludis Appointed 

George Kaludis, A&S '60, was recently 
appointed Assistant Dean for Student 
Life, replacing Frederick S. Demarr 
who left to take another position. 

Mr. Kaludis was graduated from the 
University in January. His appointment 




Mr. Kaludis 

marks him as the youngest dean in 
Maryland's history. 

While attending the University, Mr. 
Kaludis majored in Government and 
Politics. A campus leader, Mr. Kaludis 
was treasurer of the Student Govern- 
ment Association. He was elected into 
Omicron Delta Kappa, scholastic and 
service honorary, and Kalegethos, fra- 
ternity honorary. Mr. Kaludis was a 
member of Sigma Phi Epsilon, social 
fraternity. 



Pasteurized Crab Meat 

A vers heavy end-of-season yield ol 
( tiesapeake Bay crabs this year did not 
produce a glut on the market, Most ol 
the credit is being given to the l ni 
sits's Seafood Laboratory which is K> 
cated in ( risfield. I he 1 aboratorj there 
tested and publicized a pasteurization 
process enabling the storage ol crab 

meat si\ months Or longer under re- 
frigeration. 

"In five or si\ years, fresh crab meal 

will be as obsolete as raw milk." pre- 
dicted Dr. George W. Wharton, pro- 
fessor and head ol the Department ol 
/.oology. 

As head ol the department that over- 
sees the Seafood Processing Laboratory, 
Dr. Wharton saw the unusually big 

catch in September and October as the 
first real test of the effect of the pas- 
teurization process on the State's 
economy. 

It it were not possible to preserve 
large quantities of excess crab meat un- 
til there is a greater demand for it. 
catches like the one that is only now 
tapering off would lower the price 
enough to wipe out the profit. Dr. 
Wharton explained. 

"Not only does pasteurization assist 
the processor," he said, "but it also 




the 1960 henry Laurence gantt medal for "distinguished achievements in management 
as a service to the community" was awarded to Charles P. McCormick, Chairman of 
the Board of McCormick and Co. Mr. McCormick also serves as Chairman of the Board 
of Regents, University of Maryland. 

Mr. McCormick, center, received the award from Robert G. Hess. left. President and 
General Manager. Wright Machinery Co.. Division of Sperry Rand Corp. Chairman of 
the Gantt Medal Board of Award, Paul G. Hoffman. Managing Director. United Nations 
Special Fund, is pictured to the right. 

The Medal, awarded annually by the American Management Association and the 
American Society of Mechanical Engineers, was presented in New York during the 
AMA's Personnel Conference. 



January-February, 1961 



stabilizes the price of crabs for the 
waterman." 

The pasteurization process was in- 
troduced on a wide scale in 1958. A 
partial survey of the Eastern Shore this 
year showed that 40,000 pounds of crab 
meat were pasteurized in 1957. The 
figure jumped to 147,000 pounds in 
1958 and to 174,000 pounds last year, 
when there was a crab shortage. 

The process specifically recommended 
by the University Laboratory brings the 
crab meat to a heat of 170 degrees for 
a period of one minute within her- 
metically sealed cans. 

John R. Cox, bacteriologist on the 
laboratory's staff of seven persons, has 
become the "official taster" of the group. 
Even after all his experience, he said, 
he cannot usually taste any difference 
between fresh and pasteurized crab 
meat. 

The part of the process which the 
Laboratory is now trying to improve 
is the method of heating. Experiments 
with a microwave oven show that the 
two hours required by the huge pressure 
cookers to come to the necessary heat- 
ing point can be reduced to a few 
minutes. 

A Crisfield bank president describes 
the pasteurization process as, "The life 
saver of the crab meat industry." 



2,000th Student Enrolls 
in Far East Program 

Education Services officials recently an- 
nounced the enrollment of its 2,000th 
University of Maryland student in 1960. 

A2C James A. Martin, 6485th Oper- 
ations Squadron, was student number 
2,000 and one of 501 Maryland students 
who enrolled in Term I. The 501 stu- 
dent enrollment was the highest in the 
Far East. 

Tachi's education program has a long 
history of accomplishments over the 
years, but during the first quarter of 
fiscal year 1961 all records fell, officials 
said. 

ECI enrollments totaled 632 for the 
first quarter. In September Tachi was 
the most active APO with 270 ECI 
registrations. 

Tachi's previous record was 259 en- 
rollments in June, 1960. 

The Group Study Program also broke 
previous records for Term I with 904 
enrollments. This number includes 30 
students who participated in the On- 
Duty School at the East Education 
Center. 

The On-Duty School curriculum in- 
cludes English, arithmetic and social 



studies. Records indicate that 90 per 
cent of the graduates of this program 
are achieving success on the High 
School GED test. Many of these grad- 
uates proceed to University of Mary- 
land courses, officials said. 

Also during the first term 31 enroll- 
ment for college courses with Sophia 
University were accomplished. 

Second Brechbill Lecture 

The College of Education will present 
the second Brechbill Memorial Lecture 
February 21 at 7:30 p.m., in the Student 
Union Building. Speaker will be former 
Dean of the College, Harold Benjamin; 
he will discuss "What Good is a Uni- 
versity in the Americas?". All Maryland 
alumni are invited to attend the lecture 
and the reception which will follow. 
The Brechbill Lecture honors Henry 
Harper Brechbill, former Assistant Dean 
of the College. 



Fund Appoints Filbert 

Howard C. Filbert, prominent Balti- 
more engineer and business executive, 
has been selected as The Greater Uni- 
versity of Maryland Fund's National 
Alumni Canvass Chairman by the 
Fund's Planning Committee. 

At the same time the Committee 
adopted a schedule calling for the gen- 
eral canvass program to get underway 
in the week of March 6-10. 

Dr. John C. Krantz, Head of the 
School of Medicine's Department of 
Pharmacology, will direct the Special 
Gifts Program; and Dr. Albert E. Gold- 



stein, Baltimore urologist, will continue 
to coordinate the over-all activities of 
the Fund. 

All three University alumni have been 
actively associated with The Greater 
University of Maryland Fund since its 
organization in 1958. 

Filbert, Executive Vice President of 
Miller Research Laboratories, is a grad- 
uate of Baltimore Polytechnic Institute. 
He holds a B.S. degree, with highest 
honors, and M.E. and M.S. degrees in 
mechanical engineering from the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 

While at College Park, he was elect- 
ed to Tau Beta Pi, engineering honor- 
ary fraternity, Omicron Delta Kappa, 
leadership honor society, and Phi Kappa 
Phi, scholastic honorary fraternity. 

Before his association with Miller 
Research Laboratories, Filbert was chief 
of the engineering division of the Naval 
Ordnance Laboratory at White Oak. 

The author of numerous publications. 
Filbert has held executive positions with 
The Martin Company and Balmar Cor- 
poration in Baltimore. 

He is a member of the American 
Rocket Society, for which he serves as 
Maryland chapter President; American 
Ordnance Association; and National 
Society Professional Engineers. 

Filbert, who is registered as a pro- 
fessional engineer in the State of Mary- 
land, has been cited by the U. S. Navy 
for significant scientific contributions to 
the development of naval weapons sys- 
tems. 

Active in civic and community pro- 
grams, he is presently serving as ruling 
elder of the Arlington Presbyterian 
Church in Baltimore, and general super- 
intendent of the Sunday School. 



^ Mr. Filbert and President Elkins discuss the Fund. 




the Maryland Magazine 




Dean Stamp Retires 



THE BOARD OF REGENTS UNANIMOUSLY AGREED TO GIVE THE 
retiring Dean of Women, Adele Stamp, the title of Dean 
of Women Emeritus. Miss Stamp, who has been at the Uni- 
versity 38 years, is the first woman in its history to receive 
a title of emeritus, the highest faculty honor. 

President Elkins announced the award at a faculty recep- 
tion on December 4th for Miss Stamp. More than 300 mem- 
bers of the faculty attended the reception. The reception 
was sponsored by the Campus Club, Phi Kappa Phi, Faculty 
Alumni Club, and the American Association of University 
Professors. 

A remote control television was presented to Miss Stamp 
by her many friends among the faculty. 



Miss Stamp can look back on 38 years of achievement as 
the University's first and only Dean of Women. She was 
instrumental in starting the Campus Club. Alpha Lambda 
Delta, freshmen women's scholastic honorary, and Mortar 
Board, junior women's achievement honorary, were brought 
to the campus through Miss Stamp's efforts. Maye Dave, an 
annual event when the junior women honor the graduating 
seniors, was started by Miss Stamp. 

When asked of her retirement plans, Miss Stamp announced 
that she intends to travel over the country visiting friends 
and renewing acquaintances with many of "her girls." 




By Dr. Verne E. Chatelain, professor of the department of history 



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Sergeant Philip T. Reeder 
The Maryland Line, C.S.A. 

1862-1865 



LETTERS FROM THE WAR FRONT AND OTHER RECORDS 
dealing with the experiences of Sergeant Philip T. 
Reeder of Company B, Second Regiment of the Maryland 
Line, Confederate Army, recently made available to the Uni- 
versity of Maryland Library by an old and distinguished St. 
Mary's County family, offer an excellent opportunity to study 
and to assess the Civil War from the point of view of the 
soldier in the ranks, as well as to gain a better insight into 
the part played by the State of Maryland in that great struggle 
a century ago. 1 

Sergeant Reeder was only one of the hundreds and finally 
thousands of young men from the Old Line State — from the 
eastern shore, from the Baltimore area, from the Frederick 
district, and, most of all, from the southern counties along 
the Potomac — who quietly and often furtively slipped away 
from their homes in spite of the steps taken by the Federal 
government to prevent them, to find their way to Richmond 
and other points in the Confederacy for the purpose of enlist- 
ing in the Southern cause. Reeder's entire outfit, Company 



B, it should be noted, was recruited originally in St. Mary's 
County, just as Company A of the same regiment was largely 
made up of men from Baltimore. 

Young Philip arrived, apparently with other men from St. 
Mary's County, in Jeff Davis's capital on the banks of the 
James in the middle of August, 1862. Thus he enlisted too 
late in that year to participate in any of fighting of the 
Peninsular campaign, or, for that matter, in either Second 
Manassas or Antietam. It may be noted, however, that other 
Marylanders of the old First Regiment saw action at both 
First and Second Manassas before the disbanding of that 
unit after approximately one year's service, in September, 
1862 — as had also certain other smaller and specialized units 
of artillery and cavalry, that earlier joined the Confederate 
forces, largely from Baltimore and Frederick. 

When Reeder reached Richmond plans were under way 
to bring all Maryland men together in one consolidated 
organization, to be officially called "The Maryland Line" — 
a term of reference reminiscent of the days of the American 



8 



the Maryland Magazine 



Revolution, when Marylanders, recruited for Washington's 
army and drilled and led by General (later Governor) Small- 
wood, were designated the "Maryland," or 'Old Line." It 
was felt that such a consolidation would do much to empha- 
size Maryland's relationship to the Southern cause, as a 
sympathetic and active partner, despite the technicality that 
it was not a secession state. Such a plan, moreover, would 
serve as a high incentive to even greater participation on the 
part of the "Old Line State," the troops of which would thus 
be specifically recognized and publicized in a way not pos- 
sible if they were subordinate to other commands from differ- 
ent states. 

Even as early as the summer of 1862, however, there were 
serious obstacles in the way of realizing the plan to organize 
the "Line." Early terms of enlistment had been short, and 
many Marylanders evidently preferred either to go home, or 
to "shop around" and to enjoy a bit of freedom from military 
service before making up their minds what next to do; 
furthermore, it was evident that large numbers were already 
closely identified with various contingents of Virginia and 
Carolina troops, and had formed new and pleasant associa- 
tions in which pride for their own State did not greatly 
influence their feelings. Sergeant Reeder, commenting on this 
situation in a letter of September 9, 1862, to his mother 
observed that in Richmond there were "large numbers" from 
his native State "loafing" — "some few worn down by service 
and others pale and sickly from diseases resulting from their 
own wanton dissipation"; and the difficulty of organizing 
completely The Md. Line' was due in no small degree to the 
fact "the Marylanders are scattered over the S. Confederacy." 

The use of the expression, "The Maryland Line," had been 
frequent, even in the first year of the war, in the official 
communications that passed betewen high-ranking field offi- 
cers and various government agencies in Richmond. Actually, 
the truth of the matter was that there was no Maryland Line 
in that period in the sense of a large contingent of Mary- 
landers, representing all, or most, of the recognized branches 
of the military establishment — infantry, artillery, cavalry, and 
so on, and operating as a brigade, or division, or possibly 
some larger grouping. At best the only distinct units of Mary- 
land had been an infantry regiment (the First Maryland) and 
other widely scattered small units, mainly of artillery and 
cavalry, each serving under outside commands which tended 
to obscure its individual identity. 



w 

that 



HEN THE SECOND MARYLAND REGIMENT WAS ORGANIZED, 

late in the summer of 1862, 2 there can be no doubt 
the Confederate high command, including both the 



President and Genera] Robert I . I ee, laid out the bope 

that this would become the nucleus tor the eventual con 

(ration Of many new recruits and additioii.il mihl.u-. units 
from the OKI Line State all ol which would possibl) be 
commanded and officered with Maryland personnel Suffice 

it to say that this expectation was never realized, despite the 
fact that lee made a serious effort at the tune ol his 
invasion of the Stale to dramatize the Southern cause and t>> 

enlist general popular support in Maryland Perhaps tin 

swiftness of the Federal maneuver to bar his progress and 

the shortness of the campaign, culminating in Antietam. had 
much to do with his failure to realize this objective 

At any rate, it should be noted that the Second Maryland 
Regiment got olf to an excellent start. Its own special!) 
recruited companies, like Sergeant Reeder's ( ompam B, 
officered from top to bottom with Marylanders, who were 
elected by the men in the ranks, were buttressed, fortunately, 
before they took the field, with some veterans of the now 
defunct First Regiment. Nevertheless, the Regiment at its max- 
imum strength probably numbered less than !i\c hundred, and 
in 1864 it usually operated with varying complements ol one 
hundred fifty to three hundred men. Participating in some 
of the greatest battles of the War, including Gettysburg, Cold 
Harbor, and Petersburg— all of which were shared in by 
Sergeant Reeder, its thin ranks were gradually reduced to 
scarcely skeleton proportions. Company B, for example, had 
thirteen officers and non-commissioned olficers at the outset, 
but surrendered, with only 1st Sergeant Reeder to represent 
that group at Appomattox; and, of sixty-five privates counted 
in the original roster, a bare eight remained at the time of 
the surrender. Nor was this the worst casualty record in the 
Regiment. That doubtful distinction belonged to Company H. 
originally with fifty-one officers and men, which was repre- 
sented by a single private on that fateful April 9, 1865; and 
two other companies, D and F, had only four men each 
remaining. 

Reeder's letters to his family in St. Mary's County mark 
him as a well educated young man, and with a keen insight 
and strong character. Though it is evident that he had left 
home without telling his mother where he was going, he was 
properly concerned for her welfare and especially wanted to 
know about the movement of "Yankee troops" in St. Mary's 
County, because rumors were current in Richmond to the 
effect that the North was taking strong measures in that part 
of Maryland to produce cooperation. Writing on September 
9, 1862, with a knowledge that Lee's army had already crossed 
the Potomac into Maryland (on the eve of the great battle 
of Antietam), Philip was of the opinion that "there can be 
no doubt as to the success of the Confederate arms." and. 



AppomnUox Court I lousi . V;i. 
T1IE HEAlU'llL/r/X/Stjf^/J^/CtrSte of r„. /J *£<>,>„<( 

/^t-fC. - -Jiffy . • " I'flt'olril I'ri.tniicr of t'lr Aflil'/ Of Not'fht ill I ~t 'f'Ji '.•■'"'. ff'l* /,- ,- 



°f S^t^C, '^Jt/'fi? ■ • " J't/i'o/ctf 1'risoiu ■■/• of the Arm'/ of Northern VirgnHit\ tuts per- 
mission to rib to his home, and tht •■ r . i fin nndistuyltetl. > 



C y ~/*>. a^uJ} &>M< € i 



January-February, 1961 



he added, "'we hardly know what will be the result generally 
of the entrance of our arms in to Md.," but "we think and 
hope ( it) will be the expulsion of the invader from our soil" — 
an event "likely to be attended with bloody consequences." 
Reporting also the (false) rumor that " 'Abe' has, with his 
Congress, removed to Philadelphia," he expressed the wish 
that "the people of the State will rise up heartily in welcoming 
the southern troops." And, he concluded, "I would not return 
now under any circumstances without having performed an 
ample part in this 'play'.'' 

A postscript to this letter, dated September 10, indicates 
that his outfit was under orders to move, "I suppose towards 
Maryland." Captain J. Parran Crane was the Company Com- 
mander; and General George H. Steuart, another Maryland 
man. was in charge of the movement of the new Regiment, 
which, as it turned out, was to be attached generally to troops 
he was holding in reserve in the Shenandoah valley, near 
Winchester. 

As a result, Reeder did not return to his native State until 
the summer of the following year, on his way to Gettysburg. 
In that titanic struggle, the Second Maryland, now a hardened 
and already a battle-scarred unit, was to have its "ample part 
in this play" in the futile effort (marked with terrible casual- 
ties and supreme heroism) to take Culp's Hill on the second 
day of the fighting. Reeder, now a First Sergeant, had a con- 
spicuous part in this engagement, in which he was more 
fortunate than many of his comrades in escaping, unscathed, 
the withering fire of the defenders of the hill. The winter 
camp ground, 1863-4, of the Second Maryland, following the 
long journey back to Virginia from Pennsylvania, was a 
pleasant area near Hanover Junction, named Cool Springs. 



A LETTER, DATED SEPTEMBER 13, 1864, AND ADDRESSED TO 
his sister, recounts generally the events of the spring 
and summer of that year, when Philip Reeder of the Mary- 
land Line (attached in this period to the division of John C. 
Breckinridge, one-time Presidential candidate) participated in 
that mighty struggle "between Lee and Grant," called usually 
the Wilderness Campaign. Writing at Petersburg, while the 
great siege was going on there, and after the bitter fighting at 
Cold Harbor, the Sergeant said: "Two 'yellow' autumns of 
labor and sad vicissitude have passed, and the third is here, 
since I left my quiet and happy home, to assume the uniform 
and enter upon the arduous duties of the military profession. 
I have endured in this time many hardships and some suffer- 
ing and have reason to fear that you and my dear friends at 
home have not altogether escaped the latter." 

Continuing, he observed that " 'tis useless to dwell upon 
the melancholy past. In May we left the cool springs and 
shady groves of Hanover, where we had spent a pleasant 
winter. — To June 3rd we were continually exposed to the 
enemy's shot and shell having slided parallel with 'Ulysses' 
(Cirant) to this date (that is, June 3). Here we had our 



first regular engagement — during this memorable campaign, 
in which 'tis said that the '2nd Maryland Infantry' covered 
itself with glory. And we here inscribed upon our banner 
the classic name, 'Cold Harbor.' Here we recaptured an 
important position, from which the enemy had dislodged a 
portion of Breckinridge's troops. — Since that time we have 
lived in the trenches, performing hard duty, and much exposed 
to the burning sun of an oppressive summer as well as the 
fire of the enemy, to all of which we have become well 
accustomed, and we are now numbered among 'Lee's vet- 
erans.' It would be difficult to explain to you the hardships 
of this long and bloody campaign. Let this suffice 'till I see 
you." 

Having described the heavy fighting near the Weldon road 
(at Petersburg), in which the Maryland men sustained serious 
losses, Reeder went on in a vein that shows clearly his aware- 
ness of the impending end of the war, and his anxiety to 
get home. "As to myself," he wrote, "like every one else, I 
am tired of the war. The two years have not, I hope, been 
entirely lost. I have tried to learn History from the actions 
and conduct of men in the absence of an Edition of Hume 
or Hallam." 

Among the thousands of young men from the Old Line 
State, who crossed the Potomac to cast their fortunes, and, 
if need be, to shed their blood in the service of the Confed- 
eracy, the name of Philip Reeder is perhaps today largely 
forgotten. 3 Yet his military career, if one takes the trouble 
to read between the lines, was rich in those experiences that 
usually fall to the lot of the soldier in the ranks. Like many 
another in the Civil War, and, for that matter, in all wars in 
whatever generation, he was to learn that waging war effec- 
tively presents the problem of doing numerous little things 
well, of sustaining the spirit — in the midst of privation, and 
death, and absence from family and loved ones — and of 
somehow finding the strength and courage in moments of 
supreme testing to rise above the commonplace and to exhibit 
qualities of greatness. 



NOTES— 

1 The Reeder papers cover a span of years from the first Wash- 
ington administration to a point shortly after the close of the 
Civil War. Records of earlier members of the family are not so 
extensive as those of Sergeant Reeder. These valuable materials 
have been made available to the Library by members of the 
Burroughs, Dixon, and Reeder families of St. Mary's County 
through the cooperation of the University's Department of History. 

2 W. W. Goldsborough's work, The Maryland Line in the Con- 
federate Army, 1861-1865, published in 1900 is a useful source 
of information relating to various Maryland military units that 
served the Southern cause in the Civil War. There is some men- 
tion of Philip Reeder in this volume. 

3 While this article deals with the story of a particular soldier, 
who happened to be devoted to the Confederacy, it should not be 
forgotten that many brave men from the Old Line State rendered 
equally effective service to the Northern cause. The task of collect- 
ing and evaluating the records of Maryland's contribution to both 
sides in the Civil War must necessarily go forward until the entire 
story can be told. 




r, .fV, 



OATH OF ALLEGIANCE. 

/ v' , rs< of I t > j County, Man land. 

• In solemnly swear in the presence oi' VlmurhUIGod, ilia) i will henceforth faithfully support, 
protect ami defend the Constitution of the i ni',.,| Stales, and the Union of the States thereun- 
( * er ; :ill(l 1,1;l1 • will in like manner abide In ajid laithl'ullv support all Acts of Congress passed 
during the existing rebellion with reform ■<■ to ilaves, so long sintl so far as not repealed, modi- 
fied or held void by Congress, or by decision of I he Supreme Court : and that I will in like man- 
ner abide by and faithfully support all IWIan [it ions of the President made during the existing 
on, having reference to slaves so long aii<] so far as not modified or declared void by de- 

()(' the Supreme (VhiiI — So lhm> mi C,„T 



rebellion, 

< ' 1 s I ( 



■" "''"'■*"■"• 



■ I 






a • " jtliglTm FI 




Nathan L. Drake 
Lecture Halls are Dedicated 



ON DECEMBER 8, 1960, THE UNIVERSITY DEDICATED THE 
Nathan L. Drake Lecture Halls to commemorate the 
achievements of the late Dr. Drake. 

Dr. Drake served the University from 1926 to 1959. Dur- 
ing this period he was Professor of Organic Chemistry and 
in 1940 he became Head of the Department of Chemistry 
serving in this position for 19 years. In 1956 he was made 
Acting Director of the Institute of Molecular Physics. From 
1930 to 1945 the master's and doctoral theses in organic 
chemistry were under Dr. Drake's direction. In all. Dr. Drake 
directed the research for 86 advanced degrees. 

As an untiring research worker, Dr. Drake devoted much 
of his time to various research efforts. During the Second 
World War, some of his most notable contributions were in 
the synthesis of antimalaria compounds. It was for the anti- 
malarial work that Dr. Drake was awarded the Hillebrand 
Prize by the Chemical Society of Washington in 1947. Dr. 
Drake's research covered a wide variety of subjects. He 
studied such natural products as cerin, friedelin, podophyilo- 
toxin and the reactions and preparations of many organic 
compounds. He published at least 56 research papers, edited 
volumes 21 and 22 of Organic Synthesis, and authored a 
Laboratory Manual of Organic Chemistry. 

During the past ten years Dr. Drake achieved a reputation 
on the campus in the construction of science buildings. With 
the aid of his faculty, he designed and supervised the construc- 
tion of the present chemistry building which was completed 



in 1950. He had a major part in the design and construction 
of the Laboratories of the Institute for Molecular Physics 
and the Physics building. In 1958-59 he carried a major role 
in the design and construction of the modern Lecture Halls 
which were dedicated in his honor on December 8. 

At dedication ceremonies. Dr. Charles E. White, Head of 
the Department of Chemistry, presented a resume of Dr. 
Drake's activities during his 33 years with the Department. 
Louis F. Fieser presented an address dealing with incendiarv 
materials. 

President Elkins dedicated the Lecture Halls by stating, 
"While it is doubtless true that Dr. Drake's legacy was good, 
the fact stands out that he improved upon what he inherited. 
The test of a scholar is how he contribues to his special field, 
and the test of an administrator is the kind and quality o\ 
people whom he retains and attracts to a department or organ- 
ization. Dr. Drake passed both tests with superior grades." 

"Shortly after the death of Dr. Drake," continued Dr. 
Elkins. "the University administration was besieged by requests 
to commemorate his achievements, and this was received 
enthusiastically by the Board of Regents." 

"As President of the University and on behalf o\ the Board 
of Regents, 1 take this special occasion to dedicate these halls 
to a glorious past which points to a brilliant future." 

President Elkins concluded with a quotation, "If you would 
see his monument, look around you!" 



January-February, 1961 



11 



JBcclin! where Democracy 

Struggles for Survival 

110 miles within East Germany, this former capital 

of the Third Reich has been torn for 1 5 years by 

competing jurisdictions and power rivalries. 

By Dr. Elmer Plischke, professor and head of the department of 

GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 



Perlm, 



THE ONE-TIME CAPITAL OF A GREAT 

world power, is today a city of excep- 
tional interest — a center of competing jurisdictions and inter- 
national rivalries. It is virtually a beleaguered island, isolated 
within the Communist-controlled so-called East German 
Democratic Republic. Formerly the epicenter of the Weimar 
Republic and the Nazi Third Reich, it now is dependent upon 
outside economic and financial assistance for its very exist- 
ence. It is many times divided — geographically, politically, 
economically, and governmentally. 



€arlp igogttoar Beuelopmentsi 

On May 8, 1945 — V-E Day — the German High Command 
signed an unconditional surrender in Berlin. During May and 
June, prior to the arrival of the three Western Allies, the 
metropolis was solely in the hands of the Russian Army. The 
Soviet military administration immediately established a new 
city government under an appointed "Magistrat," which was 
largely controlled by Moscow-trained German Communists. 

For occupation purposes, the Allied authorities divided the 
metropolis into four "sectors," East Berlin remaining under 
Soviet domination, and the western portions of the city being 
allocated to France, the United Kingdom, and the United 
States. Berlin as a whole, however, was clearly excluded from 
the four "zones of occupation" into which Germany was 
divided. Each of these zones came under one of the four 
Allied powers, the Soviet Union maintaining occupation con- 
trol over East Germany, within which Greater Berlin is 
located. 

Since 1945 Berlin has had several forms of government. 
The first was that established by the Soviet military authority 
in 1945, the second was based upon the "Temporary Consti- 
tution of 1946," and the third was founded on the more per- 
manent "Constitution of 1950." However, because of the 
success of the democratic elements of the city in freeing 
themselves from the entanglements of minority control by the 
Communists, the latter, with Soviet assistance, created a fourth 
Berlin government. Initially this was based upon, but only 
tangentially in conformity with, the Temporary Constitution 
of 1946. Subsequently, in 1953, it was founded rather on a 
legislative enactment. 



The city, therefore, was split, and two separate constitutive 
arrangements have been in effect: the Constitution of 1946 
and the superseding legislation of 1953 for the administration 
of Communist East Berlin, and the Constitution of 1950 for 
the governing of West Berlin. Both have claimed jurisdiction 
over the entire city. 

During this formative period, three elections were held. In 
that of 1946 the Communists suffered serious defeat. Subse- 
quently, unable to gain control legitimately through the elec- 
toral process, the Soviet Union turned to other devices. These 
included obstructionism in and eventual withdrawal from the 
multilateral Allied governing agencies, opposition to demo- 
cratic constitutional reform, economic and financial pressure, 
blockading the city to starve the people into capitulation, and, 
as noted, establishment of a separate city government domi- 
nated by Communist henchmen. 

Fearful of even further electoral losses, the Communists 
boycotted the city-wide elections of 1948 and 1950. Conse- 
quently, no elections at all were held in the Soviet sector in 
those years. Nor have any separate municipal elections been 
held in East Berlin since the division of the city in 1948. 

The immediate postwar history of Berlin presents a vivid 
case study of the attempt by a radical minority to acquire 
political control over the entire metropolis, and the courageous 
struggle of freedom-loving people to prevent it. This reached 
a climax at the time of the Berlin blockade. For nearly eleven 
months — June 22, 1948, to May 12, 1949 — the Soviets, sup- 
ported by German Communists, endeavored by means of 
starvation, lack of fuel, and unemployment, to force the 
people of West Berlin into accepting Communist rule and, 
amoeba-like, to absorb the entire city into the Communist 
orbit. By means of the historic and triumphant airlift, the 
Soviets were dealt a forceful blow in the language which they 
best understood, and the city was dramatically rescued. 



Complexity of (^ouernance 

The uniqueness of Berlin's post-World-War-II situation is 
reflected in its governmental affairs. Few cities can boast of 
as much government. There is a complete municipal system 
comprised of all the normal legislative, executive, and judicial 
organs, which constitutes the de jure government of the entire 
city, but operates de facto only in the three sectors of West 



12 



the Maryland Magazine 



Berlin. Paralleling it, in the Soviet-controlled Eastern sector, 
there is a separate city government, which similarly embraces 
a full set of political institutions. Moreover, each of the 20 
geographic subdivisions of the city— known as boroughs or 
Bezirke — also has its own governmental machinery. 

In addition, there is a superimposed layer of Allied author- 
ity, at the center of which is the '"Allied Kommandatura." It 
was created in 1945 as a quadripartite agency — comprised oi 
the French, Soviet, United Kingdom, and United States 
Commandants — to administer the affairs of the city. Following 
Soviet withdrawal in June 1948, the three Western powers 
continued Kommandatura operations de jure on a quadri- 
partite basis, but de facto as a three-power mechanism, with 
the door left open for eventual Soviet return. 

Since the division of the city there have been dual Allied 
controls, the Kommandatura to deal with the Government 
of West Berlin, and the unilateral Soviet Control Commission 
concerned with the East Berlin Government. Supplementing 
these, there have been the unilateral sectoral administrations 
of the four occupying powers, each with jurisdiction over 
certain occupational matters in its respective segment of the 
city. 

Thus, since 1945, Berlin has been the "capital" or "head- 
quarters" of eight major governmental units, including three 
metropolitan governments (the initial administration of the 
entire metropolis, the government of West Berlin, and the 
East Berlin government); one German "national government" 
(the East German Democratic Republic), as noted later; and 
four different occupational regimes, including the Komman- 
datura. Together with the four unilateral Allied occupational 
administrations and the 20 city boroughs, this comprises a 
total of some 30 elements of government, each with its own 
powers and administrative machinery. Few cities have simul- 
taneously been subjected to as manifold and complex a system 
of governance. 



international legal ant political Status 
of jBerliti 

For purposes ol the occupation, the World \^.u n Mliea 
clearly distinguished Berlin from the rest ol (iciin.nr. rhe 
Protocol oi September 22, IM44. on the /ones ol occupation 
in Germany and the administration oi Berlin, made it cleai 

that the metropolis was not a "part ol" or "on" the termors 
to be occupied by any of the lour powers, but regarded it 
as a separate jurisdictional "enclave" to be jointly occupied 
This was internationally reconfirmed in an Allied statement ol 
June 5, 1945, accompanying the surrender documents. 

The Western Allies have been careful to prescr\e their 
prerogatives and responsibilities concerning Berlin in their 
relations with West Germany, and, in dealing with the Soviet 
Union, they have insisted on the continuance ol their right 
to be in Berlin. Moreover, in the Conventions of l l >52 and 
1954, terminating their occupation ol West Germany, the) 
specifically reserved their rights "relating to . . . Berlin." 
Until 1958 the Soviet Union apparently observed a similar 
policy. 

In November of that year, however, the Soviet government 
began to consider East Berlin as a component of the East 
German Republic and, in a note to the Western powers, it 
indicated that, because of their alleged violations, the Potsdam 
Agreement of 1945 was obsolete, and the Protocol on Berlin 
was no longer valid. Subsequently, the East German govern- 
ment asserted that it regarded the entire metropolis as lying 
within its jurisdiction. This line of reasoning was intended to 
terminate Western Allied (and West German) rights in 
Greater Berlin, which has engendered one of the most inflam- 
atory issues in contemporary East-West relations. 



Perlin anb tfje Itoo <§ermanj>s 

In 1949 the Western Allies prohibited the framers of the 
West German Constitution from incorporating Berlin as an 
original constituent state in the Federal Republic. In the 
course of time, however, the metropolis came to be treated 
more and more on a par with the other states and, as a matter 
of practice, an extensive network of governmental relation- 
ships has been evolved to coordinate West Berlin with the 
West German Federation. 

In effect West Berlin is, in many respects, politically indis- 
tinguishable from the states comprising West Germany, while 
technically it is not an integral part of the West German 
Republic. Berlin's position in this regard remains somewhat 
ambiguous because, as far as the Soviet Union, Germany 
as a whole, and the East German Republic are concerned, 
the Western Allies continue to reserve their basic legal rights 
in the metropolis, while at the same time they permit practical 
amalgamation with the West German Republic. 

The relationship of East Berlin to East Germany is quite 
different. Because the latter is not a federation, the problem 
of status as a constituent element has not arisen. Berlin has 
been designated the capital of the East German Republic, 
and the government of the latter is located at Pankow in 
East Berlin. Moreover, in 1952 the government of East Ger- 
many established a hierarchical system of fifteen provinces 
to serve as subsidiary administrative districts. One of these 
comprises East Berlin, so that, as far as governance is con- 
cerned, it is fully incorporated into the East German system. 



Berlin's governmental status and structure during the post- 
war years, particularly since the Soviet withdrawal from the 
Kommandatura in mid- 1948 and the division of the city, 
thus has been one of the most unusual and complex in modern 
times. It is comprised of variegated and competing layers of 
authority, both German and Allied. 

The populace of the metropolis has been subjected to pro- 
tracted strain and tension. This has resulted not only from 
the ordinary problems that normally beset a large metro- 
politan community, or from the wartime destruction, the 
resultant displacement of the people, and the overwhelming 
task of reconstruction. It also has been caused by geographic 
isolation from the West; by uncertain avenues of communi- 
cation via air, rail, Autobahn (super-highway), and canal 
through many miles of Communist-controlled territory; and 
by waves of political, economic, and financial crises. 

Perhaps most important of all, the Soviet Union has come 
to view Berlin as a vital element in its politico-diplomatic 
maneuvering with the West. The Government of West Berlin. 
seeking to maintain a citadel of freedom within the Soviet 
orbit, lives in constant threat of total engulf ment. The conflict 
of East and West for control, and the division oi the city, 
have resulted in the existence of two constitutions, two gov- 
ernments, two sets of political parties, and two orientations. 

The stakes in Berlin are high, and the duel between Eastern 
communism and Western democracy has been unceasing since 
1945. As a consequence, the problems of the metropolis have 
come to be dealt with according to the objectives of not only 
local, but also competitive national and international politics. 



January-February, 1961 



13 




Do You Remember? 



T, 



HE AERIAL VIEW SHOWN ABOVE IS SIMILAR TO THE ONE 

used in the yearbook Reveille, 1927, but taken from another 
angle. This is how the Campus looked during the first five 
years Dean Emeritus Adele Stamp was at the University. Some 
of the buildings then on the campus were: the Gymnasium, 
the Engineering group, the Administration Building, the Old 
Chemistry Building, the Library, Morrill Hall, the Hospital, 
Gerneaux Hall, and the Agricultural Building. Can you locate 
them in this view? 

This is another example of the types of materials which the 
Maryland & Rare Books Department is searching for to add 
to its collection of University and Maryland information. 

Anyone having items to add to the collection is requested 
to contact Howard Rovelstad, Director of Libraries, McKeldin 
Library, University of Maryland, College Park (phone WA 
7-3800 x34l), or Mrs. Harold Hayes, Librarian, Maryland & 
Rare Books Department, McKeldin Library, University of 
Maryland, College Park (call WA 7-3800 x666). 

In the September-October, 1960, issue of The Maryland 
Magazine, on Page 16, a reproduction of a postcard dated 
1909 and showing the football team was printed. Since pub- 
lication of this issue, two letters have come to the University 
Library about the postcard. One letter came from J. Paul 
Blundon, Class of 1915, of Keyser, West Virginia. Mr. Blun- 



don suggested names of persons who could help us to identify 
the players. The other letter came from Kenneth Grace, 
Agriculture, 1916, now of Easton, Maryland, who identified 
the players as follows: 

"I knew two of them. In the following list those of whom 
I am not sure have a question mark after their names. I know 
the first name of one, possibly two, and the others listed 
below are shown with their nicknames in most cases. From 
left to right — Munson (?), seated by the goal post. 

Third from the left and lying on the ground: Pop Koehler — 
deceased. 

Lying on the ground in the center with feet toward the 
left: E. P. Williams (?). 

Lying on the ground with feet toward the right: Percy 
Trax — deceased. 

The boy behind Percy Trax and looking over his shoulder 
may be Burton Shipley. 

Back row, standing — 

Fourth from the left: Koska Mudd (?) 

Fifth from the left: Wm. B. (Bill) Kemp. 

Maybe this will help a little. Perhaps Bill Kemp or Burton 
Shipley can identify all of them. 

Can anyone help us further from the information given 
here? 



14 



the Maryland Magazine 



Maryland Books and Authors 

Edited by Mrs. Harold Hayes, Head, Maryland and Rare Hooks Department 




Ward, Archibald F., Jr. SEASONS OF 
THE SOUL. Richmond, Va.: John 
Knox Press. 1960. 136 pp. $3.00. 

The Psalms have brought much com- 
fort and strength to the healthy as well 
as the sick. In an entirely new approach. 
Dr. Ward has given us new (and often 
abridged) versions of the psalms. Using 
French and German translations pri- 
marily, he has attempted to capture the 
deep feeling in which the various authors 
wrote. To find adequate words in the 
English language was the awesome task 
he encountered. With a glorious sort of 
freedom, he has arranged the Psalms 



under general areas based largely on 
mood-tone. The four seasons of the 
soul are "When Anguished is my Heart," 
"Teach Me Thy Paths," "The Lord 
Sustains Me," and "A New Song." The 
resultant volume is eminantly successful 
in fulfilling the author's purpose. 

Out of a rich heritage of working 
with emotionally disturbed patients. Dr. 
Ward has come to appreciate man's joys 
as well as his sorrows. These transla- 
tions of the Psalms constantly reflect 
both the intention of the author as well 
as the existential needs of man. The 
46th Psalm is probably one of the most 
familiar to us. This is Dr. Ward's trans- 
lation of the first part of that psalm. 



(/'('</ is for its a hope and strength, 
readily accessible, a help in our 

distresses. 
This is why we shall not fear. 
even if the earth should he so it/isei 
that the mountains sink in the midst 

of the sea: 
even if the waters bubble and boil 
s(} that the mountains tremble with 

their fury. 
There is a river whose waters bring 

rejoicing to the city of God, 
the holy habitation of the Most 

High. 

To enjoy the full flavor of these new 
translations the reader ought to immerse 
himself in the chapter heading that most 
accurately describes the way he feels. 
Then, as Dr. Ward suggests, they are 
especially enjoyable read aloud. 

In an Epilogue entitled "Wholeness 
and Holiness," the author presents a fine 
rationale for these translations as well 
as pertinent examples of how they may 
be used. In it he says. "This volume is 
intended not only for those profession- 
ally engaged in the healing arts, but 
even more as a treasury of devotion for 
all sorts and conditions of mankind." 
For those who "read, mark, learn, and 
inwardly digest" this volume. I am cer- 
tain this will be true. 

Reviewed by: Rev. A. P. L. Prest, 
Jr., Chaplain, Medicai College 
of Virginia, Richmond. Virginia. 
Reprinted by permission of 
Presbyterian Survey. 

Ed. Note: Dr. Ward is now on the 
staff of State Hospital South at Black- 
foot. Idaho. He received his Ph.D. 
from the University of Maryland in 
1947. Dr. Ward did his thesis on "The 
Diagnosis and Treatment of the Psy- 
chopathic Offender in the United 
States." The thesis is on file in the 
Maryland & Rare Books Department 
at the Mckeldin Library. 



January-February, 1961 



15 



UNIVERSITY SPORTS 



By JOE BLAIR Sports Editor 



Advertise in 
The Maryland Magazine 



College of 
AGRICULTURE 



A. B. Hamilton 



Ginn Addresses Convention 



T 

J. ti 



HE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND VAR- 

sitj teams completed one of the most 
successful fall sports programs in re- 
cent years when the Soccer team ad- 
vanced to the finals of the NCAA tour- 
nament in Brooklyn, New York before 
losing to St. Louis 3-2. The football 
team completed their season with a 6-4 
record, their first winning season since 
the undefeated team of 1955. The Cross- 
country team finished second in the 
annual Atlantic Coast Conference meet 
while the Soccer team won their eighth 
ACC title and the Freshman football 
team compiled a 4-1 record. 

The football team in compiling their 
6-4 record finished third in the ACC 
with a 5-2 record. They opened the 
season with a 31-8 win over West Vir- 
ginia. They then lost to a powerful 
intersectional opponent Texas 34-0 and 
the ACC champion Duke 20-7. After 
dropping a close decision 13-10 to 
North Carolina State the Terps rebound- 
ed with a 19-17 win over Clemson, 14-13 
over Wake Forest and a shut-out 15-0 
over South Carolina. After a 28-9 de- 
feat by Penn State the Terps closed the 
season with 22-19 victory over North 
Carolina and a 44-12 romp over Vir- 
ginia. 

The football team also reigned over 
the record books as they set 24 new 
Maryland records. They erased names 
of such stars as Jack Scarbath, Tommy 
Mont and Lloyd Coltcryahn from the 
books and also records that dated back 
to 1940. 

The freshmen team with the finest 
group of backs to be seen on the same 
squad in a long time defeated South 
' arolina 22-6 at Columbia, Virginia 
50-8 at Charlottesville, George Wash- 
ington 22-0 and Bullis 34-14 before los- 
ing to Navy 24-22 at Annapolis. 

I be cross-country team was undefeat- 
ed during the regular season with wins 
c\cr Navy, and five conference teams 
including eventual champion Duke. 



However the Terps finished second to 
Duke in the Conference meet held on 
the Maryland Golf Course. The Terps 
had sophomore John Garten finishing 
third, junior Mark Wells fifth, senior 
Frank Colavita seventh and Dick Cred- 
itor 10th. 

The Soccer team won their eighth 
consecutive ACC championship and re- 
tained the unblemished record in the 
Conference. They have now compiled 
a 30-0-1 record in the conference and 
a 106-23-8 record in their 14 years of 
competition. 

In advancing to the finals of the 
NCAA tournament the Terps first 
blanked North Carolina 5-0 to win the 
right to enter the tournament. They 
then topped Rutgers at Rutgers in the 
first round and Connecticut at Brooklyn 
College 4-0 before bowing to St. Louis 
3-2 for runner-up honors. 

Cliff Krug, the Terps leading scorer 
with 28 goals, broke the old ACC mark 
of 19 goals in a single season and tied 
the Conference mark of five goals in a 
single game with his five-goal perform- 
ance against Johns Hopkins. 

The Basketball team is embarking on 
a tough 22-game schedule which in- 
cludes intersectional opponents Penn 
State, Minnesota, Navy, Georgetown, 
and George Washington in addition to 
the conference schools. The Terps will 
also compete in the Dixie Classic for 
the first time along with the annual ACC 
tournament. 

They have six lettermen returning 
with 6-10 Bob Wilson, 6-7 Bob McDon- 
ald and 6-2 juniors Paul Jelus and 
Bruce Kclleher in the starting lineup. 
The fifth starter will come from a fine 
trio of sophomores in 6-2 Bob Eicher, 
6-3 Bill Stasiulatis and 6-6 Jerry Green- 
span. A 5-10 sophomore George Hodor 
will also see a lot of action this year. 
After a fine fall practice session Coach 
H. A. "Bud" Millikan is optimistic about 
the 1960-61 basketball season. 



John L. Ginn, '56, Agricultural Eco- 
nomics, addressed the Annual Produce 
Packaging Association Convention and 
Exposition at Miami, Florida. He re- 
ported on his research for the U. S. 
Department of Agriculture on the pack- 
aging and transportation of vegetables. 



'06 Reunion 

The class of 1906 had a reunion of their 
own in Charlotte, N. C. when J.J.T. 
and Mrs. Graham of Bowie and J. 
Milton Hunter of Church Hill, visited 
with Baynard H. Storm. Reports indi- 
cate they divided their time between 
viewing the Great Smoky Mountains 
and conversation about their Old Alma 
Mater. 



Mannarelli Heads Chile 
Agriculture 

Vergillio Mannarelli has progressed 
rapidly since returning to Chile from 
the University of Maryland. He held 
an important post in the newly estab- 
lished Agricultural Economics and Mar- 
keting Department. Recently he was 
made Director General of Agriculture; 
a post immediately under the Minister 
of Agriculture and in the Chilean gov- 
ernment is equivalent to that of Under- 
secretary of the Department of Agricul- 
ture in the United States. 



Col. Lance Attends War College 

Lt. Col. John E. Lance, Jr., '48, has been 
selected to attend The Army War Col- 
lege at Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania. 
The ten-month course is scheduled to 
be completed in June 1961. The Army's 
senior school prepares selected officers 
for future assignments to top staff and 
command positions in the Armed forces 
and other key government positions. 
Colonel Lance entered the Army in 
1943 and was last stationed in Wash- 
ington, D. C. He is a graduate of Morris- 
town High School. 



16 



the Maryland Magazine 



BURDETTE IN PERU 

Roger Burdette, '33, is with the Food 
and Agriculture Organization and is an 
advisor and teacher at the National 
Agriculture University, Lima, Peru. 

Burdette has been with the United 
Nations on foreign assignments for al- 
most ten years. Most of this time he 
has been in South America. From 1951 
to 1956 he was stationed in Chile on 
an FAO-World Bank Mission which 
developed marketing programs. 

In 1957 Burdette was assigned to 
Lima, Peru where he assisted in the de- 
velopment of terminal markets and the 
training of personnel. From his recent 
letters he gives the impression that train- 
ing of young people and seeing them go 
"to the States for graduate training" is 
his greatest pleasure. 



Dairy Team National Winner 

Maryland 4-H Dairy Judging Team is 
tops in the nation for the 15th time 
since 1920. The team won first place 
over 33 teams in the contest competing 
in the National Dairy Judging Contest 
at Waterloo, Iowa. 

With a high score of 2,079 points, 
the Maryland team is eligible to receive 
an invitation to the International Dairy 
Cattle Judging Contest in London, Eng- 
land. The invitation will be extended for 
1961. 

Illinois placed second with a score of 
2,027 and Tennessee third with 2,026 
points. 

Members of the Maryland team are 
Curtis Day, Damascus; Frank Downey, 
Williamsport; and Billy J. Heath, Sparks. 
James Claggett, Germantown is the al- 
ternate member. 

The Maryland team placed first in 
judging Holsteins, with Billy Heath top 
scoring individual and Frank Downey 
second. 

In judging Jerseys, the Maryland 
team placed third, and second in judg- 
ing Brown Swiss. Tne team placed fifth 
in judging Ayrshires. 

In individual scoring, Curtis Day was 
first high individual with 697 points; 
Bill Heath, second scoring individual 
with 694 points, and Frank Downey, 
sixth with a score of 688 points. 

Coached by John Morris, Extension 
dairy specialist, and Dorothy Emerson, 
associate state 4-H club agent, the Mar, - 
land team members gave a top perform- 
ance to win the highly competitive dairy 
judging event. 



Ward Gives Practical Training 

James Roland Ward, '31, gave his 
Gaithersburg High School pupils prac- 
tical sales experience by taking over the 
W. T. Grant Co. store in Rockville for 



a day. The students took over all duties 
from acting manager to selling hot dogs, 
toys and ladies clothing. They were cele- 
brating National Retail Career Week. 
As members of Montgomery County's 
distributive education program, they nor- 
mally spend half of the day in classes 
and the other half working. On this 
particular day the regular store person- 
nel were given the day olf. When it was 
all over Ward remarked, "It just shows 
that when you give young adults some 
responsibility they really accept the 
job." 



Downey Heads Federal 4-H 

New head of 4-H Club Work in the 
Federal Extension Service of the U. S. 
Department of Agriculture will be Mylo 
S. Downey, '27, formerly assistant 4-H 
director. Mr. Downey was named by 
FES Administrator P. V. Kepner, fol- 
lowing the step-up of Dr. E. W. Aiton 
to FES Assistant Administrator in 
charge of programs. 

Mr. Downey, a native of Maryland, 
was Maryland State 4-H Club leader 
for nine years before joining the Ex- 
tension 4-H staff in 1954. Earlier he had 
served successively as a vocational agri- 
culture teacher and as an Extension 
county agent. When a boy he was a 
4-H'er, outstanding in dairying, and later 
became a local volunteer 4-H leader. He 
holds a Bachelor of Science and Master 
of Arts degrees in agricultural educa- 
tion from the University of Maryland. 
In addition, he has done graduate work 
in human development and leadership 
at the University of Maryland, the Uni- 
versity of Chicago and Cornell Univer- 
sity. 

In his recent capacity as assistant 4-H 
Club director in USDA, Mr. Downey 
has been the Department's liaison with 
many educational and industrial leaders 
over the country who support 4-H youth 
programs. With a special interest in 
programs for young people in other 
lands, he served four months as a con- 
sultant on Rural Youth Programs for 
the Economic Cooperation Administra- 
tion in Greece. 



Mr. Eb\ is director ol the New York 
labor relations consulting firm, Ameri- 
can Management Counselors. He is vice 
president ot Hand) Associates, Inc 
consulting linn specializing m executive 
incentive compensation plans and execu- 
tive search and development 



College of 

ARTS AND 
SCIENCES 



Staff of the College 



Labor Consultant 

Herbert O. Eby, '32, has opened an 
office in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Mr. 
Eby will serve as labor relations con- 
sultant to firms in the Tri-State area. 




Mr. Eby 



National Defense Fellowships 

National Defense Graduate Fellowships, 
each providing a basic stipend of $2,000 
a year, are held by four first-year grad- 
uate students working for the Ph.D. de- 
gree in Philosophy at the University of 
Maryland. 

These fellowships, awarded by the 
U. S. Commissioner of Education of 
the Department of Health, Education, 
and Welfare, are part of a nation-wide 
fellowship program, based on Title IV 
of the National Defense Education Act 
of 1958, designed to assist graduate stu- 
dents who are preparing themselves to 
teach in the Nation's colleges and uni- 
versities. Besides granting the fellow- 
ships themselves, the U. S. Office of 
Education assists the university depart- 
ments with which the Fellows are affili- 
ated by providing funds to enable the 
departments to deal with the increased 
teaching load and in general to 
strengthen their capacity to furnish grad- 
uate instruction of the highest quality. 
Maryland's Department of Philosophy 
is receiving for these purposes $10,000 
a year for three years, which helps to 
make possible an increase in staff as well 
as substantial purchases of essential phi- 
losophy books for the McKeldin Library. 

The fellowships run for three years, 
the normal period of residence required 
for the Ph.D. degree. The stipend in- 
creases to $2,200 for the second year 
and to $2,400 for the third, plus an 

(Continued on next page) 



January-February, 1961 



17 



additional allowance of $400 a year for 
each dependent. Maryland's National 
Defense Graduate Fellows include two 
Maryland graduates. Jem Canning, '56 
and Robert Trevas, '60. and graduates 
o\ The College of the Pacific and of 
George Washington University. 

Two other University of Maryland 
departments have participated in the 
National Defense Graduate Fellowship 
Program: the Department of Economics, 
which began a program in 1959, and 
the Higher Education Group of the 
College of Education, which began this 
fall. 



Language Newsletter 

Dr. Henry Mendeloff, liaison professor 
between the Department of Foreign 
Languages and the College of Educa- 
tion, is the new editor of the Maryland 
Foreign Language Newsletter. Volume 
I, Number One, appeared in November. 
The bulletin is being sent as a service 
to all foreign language teachers and 
supervisors in the public schools and 
colleges of the State of Maryland. Con- 
tributors to the first issue, which ran 
to 1 I pages, included teachers and 
officials from several Maryland counties 
as well as professors from the University. 



In India 

Dr. Graciela Nemes, the biographer of 
the Spanish Nobel prize-winning poet 
Jimenez, has written a Prologue for a 
Bengali edition of his work. Platero 
and I, with Mrs. Nemes' Prologue, has 
been translated into Hindi for the Indian 
public. The book, which is probably 
Jimenez' best-known volume, was pub- 
lished on Christmas Day, 1960. 



Professor Kramer Retires 

After forty-three years of service in the 
Department of Foreign Languages, Pro- 
lessor Charles F. Kramer retired on 
July I. 1960. The Board of Regents 
named him Associate Professor Emeri- 
tus in recognition of his devotion and 
loyalty to the University of Maryland. 
During that time which saw the great 
growth of the University, Professor 
Kramer taught Latin, French and Ger- 
man, language, literature and scientific 
translations. 

A native of Pennsylvania and a grad- 
uate of Dickinson College, young 
Kramer came to College Park in the 
fall of 1916. The Department was then 
housed in old Morrill Hall. For 25 years, 
Profcsor Kramer served as a member 
of the Student Life Committee and the 
Sectioning Committee of Registration. 
He was the humanities representative 
of the Placement Bureau, was a member 



of the Committee on Foreign Language 
Instruction in the Public Schools of 
Maryland, and a member of the Visit- 
ing Committee to the Teachers' Col- 
leges, Junior Colleges and High Schools 
of Maryland. 



Visiting Lecturer 

Dr. R. G. E. Murray of the Department 
of Bacteriology and Immunology, The 
University of Western Ontario, London, 
Canada, delivered the second lecture on 
"The Structure of Microbial Cytoplasm 
and the Development of Membrane 
Systems," November 3, at Symons Hall 
Auditorium, College Park. Many guests 
from the several neighboring govern- 
ment laboratories were present in the 
audience. Dr. Murray spent three days 
on the campus visiting with the faculty 
and graduate students of the department. 



Receives Grant 

The Department of Microbiology has 
been awarded a training grant of $170,- 
370 from the National Institutes of 
Health of the U. S. Department of 
Health, Education and Welfare. This 
grant will be used to provide funds for 
fellowships and research equipment 
over a period of five years. This grant 
was awarded to the Department of 
Microbiology for the specific purpose 
of training more students at the grad- 
uate level in Microbiology. The Depart- 
ment will select in the near future, three 
individuals who will be awarded fellow- 
ships for study under this program. 
Three additional graduate students will 
be appointed during the summer months. 



Dr. Darkis Heads Research 

Dr. Frederick R. Darkis, '22, is Vice 
President and Director of Research, for 
the Liggett and Myers Tobacco Com- 
pany, Durham, North Carolina. 

Liggett and Myers recently expanded 
its research facilities with the dedication 
of a $1.2 million addition to its research 
center. Total research space now comes 
to 48,000 square feet. According to Dr. 
Darkis, L & M has "devoted much effort 
to fundamental research and [is] pub- 
lishing the information obtained as a 
result of this work." This statement was 
made as part of the remarks Dr. Darkis 
addressed to the dedication audience. 
The laboratory's research will involve 
the study of tobacco, tobacco smoke, 
paper, filters, and in some cases, even 
the tobacco smokers. 

This year "Tobacco Science," which 
publishes scientific papers relating to 
tobacco, dedicated its annual yearbook 
to Dr. Darkis. 



College of 

BUSINESS AND 

PUBLIC 

ADMINISTRATION 




Mr. Eichberg 



Eichberg Appointed 

Appointment of Robert L. Eichberg, 
'48, as system program Manager in 
Stromberg-Carlson's Electronics Division 
has been announced by Robert J. Gil- 
son, Director of systems management. 
Stromberg-Carlson is a division of Gen- 
eral Dynamics Corporation. 

In his new position Mr. Eichberg 
will have specific responsibilities in the 
field of anti-submarine warfare and re- 
lated areas. He comes to Stromberg- 
Carlson from the Research and Ad- 
vanced Development Division of Avco 
Corporation, in Wilmington, Mass., 
where he was assistant to th? vice presi- 
dent. Previously he was a staff ocean- 
ographer with the U. S. Navy Hydro- 
graphic Office in Washington, D. C. 

Mr. Eichberg has been active as a 
contributing editor to a number of trade 
and scientific publications in the fields 
of oceanography, earth sciences and 
anti-submarine warfare. 



Mr. Alien Promoted 

John V. Allen, '58, was recently ap- 
pointed Director of Public Relations 
and Development of Longwood College, 
Farmville, Virginia. 



18 



the Maryland Magazine 



After graduation, Mr. Allen went to 
Randolph-Macon College for public re- 
lations work and then on to Lake Forest 
College in Illinois, where he was As- 
sistant Director of Development. 



Budget Analyst 

John G. Reed, '51, an accounting ma- 
jor at the University, recently received 
an appointment to budget analyst at the 
Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. 



Naval Aviation Cadet 

Undergoing Pre-Flight training at the 
Naval Air Station, Pensacola, Florida, 
is Naval Aviation Cadet Algirdas V. 
Bacanskas, '60. Upon completion of his 
Pre-Flight training, he will be assigned 
to the Naval Auxiliary Air Station, 
Saufley Field, Pensacola, Florida where 
he will undergo primary flight training. 



Mr. Bounds in Florida 

Robert L. Bounds, '50, is an associate 
of the Marvin B. Harper Agency for 
the Massachusetts Mutual Life Insur- 
ance Co., in Jacksonville, Florida. He is 
a member of the Jacksonville Life Un- 
derwriters Association, and served as 
the city, county, and state chairman for 
the 1960 American Cancer crusade. 



Van Royen on Army Panel 

Dr. William Van Royen attended the 
annual fall meeting of the Army Sci- 
entific Advisory Panel at The Armor 
Center, Fort Knox, Kentucky. 

Dr. Van Royen was one of 44 panel 
members in attendance. He was ap- 
pointed to the panel in September 1958. 

The Army Scientific Advisory Panel 
was established by the Secretary of the 
Army in 1951 and is composed of 60 
of the country's leading scientists, engi- 
neers, industrialists and educators. The 
panel assists the Secretary of the Army 
and the Chief of Staff in their joint 
responsibility to give the U. S. a ground 
fighting force as effective, economical 
and progressive as scientific, techno- 
logical and industrial resources permit. 



Hawthorne Appointed 

A. C. Hawthorne, Jr., '55, Business 
Administration, has been appointed a 
field service engineer for A. M. Byers 
Company's Philadelphia Division office, 
it was announced by J. J. Merrill, Phila- 
delphia Division manager. 

Before joining Byers, Mr. Hawthorne 
was associated with Rockwell Manu- 
facturing Company. 



School of 

DENTISTRY 



Kyrle W. Prcis, D.D.S. 



Alumni Breakfast in Los Angeles 

A successful breakfast meeting oi the 
Alumni Association was held October 
18 at the Statler Hilton Hotel. Los 
Angeles. Approximately 100 alumni and 
friends attended. This annual breakfast 
is held in conjunction with the Ameri- 
can Dental Association's convention. 

Greetings were extended by Dean 
Myron S. Aisenbcrg, '22. Daniel F. 
Lynch, '25, President of the Associa- 
tion, officiated at the breakfast. He in- 
troduced a number of distinguished 
alumni; among them were: Major Gen- 
eral Robert H. Mills, '07 (Retired), 
Dean Harry B. McCarthy, '23, Dean 
Frank W. Houghton, '17, Dean Kenneth 
V. Randolph, '39. Joseph P. Cappucio, 
'46, President-Elect of the Association, 
introduced Dr. Katherine Toomey, Mrs. 
E. Benton Taylor, and Dr. Thomas P. 
Fox of Philadelphia, also Dr. William 
R. Alstadt, a Past-President of the 
American Dental Association, who ex- 
tended congratulations for this splendid 
affair. 

An alumni cocktail party was held 
that evening in the Garden West Room 
at 7:00 P.M. and a very delightful time 
was had by all. Stewart Everson, '42, 
the host chairman, led the group in 
singing. 

The Association is looking forward 
to next year's breakfast meeting to be 
held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 



Alumni in Honolulu 

Following the American Dental Asso- 
ciation Meeting at Los Angeles, a num- 
ber of our alumni journeyed to Honolulu 
to attend the Hawaiian State Dental 
Association Meeting where Lewis Can- 
tor, '21, New Haven, Conn., presented 
a clinic on "Impression Technique" and 
L. W. Bimestefer, '34, Baltimore, spoke 
on "Pregnancy Tumors" (Angiomas). 

On October 25 at 8 A.M. the first 
Hawaiian alumni breakfast was held 
under the famous Banyan Tree at the 
Moana Hotel in Honolulu, and from 
all reports, it was indeed a very happy 
occasion and indicates the strong loyalty 
of dental alumni in that area. 

Warren T. Wakai, '52, graciously 
made the arrangements for the delight- 
ful breakfast and was assisted by the 
following: Herbert Akamine, '56, Scot 
Kubota, '60, H. B. Hirand, '53, M. 
Sagawa, '50, and Raymond C. K. 
Chun, '54. 



["hose m attendance were Di and 
Mrs Albin Rauch, Dr. and Mis Nor- 
man ( hanaud, Di and Mis \ w atts, 
Dr. and Mis John Sharpley, i>i and 

Mrs. Prank Hurst. Dr. Louis ( .mtoi. 

Dr. 1. \v. Bimestefer, and Dr and 
Mrs. Harry I evin. 

L w. Bimestefer Visi is i*i erto Ri« <> 
I. \v. Bimestefer, '34, editor ol the 

Journal ol the Maryland Si. ik- Dental 
Association visited with Ernesto Davila 
Diaz. '34. member ol the Board ol Den- 
tal Examiners ol Puerto Rico, in San 
Juan. Jose M. Gonzalez, President oi 

the Board ol Dental Examiners ol 
Puerto Rico and a member ol the Amer- 
ican College met with Max Baklor. 16. 
President of the Maryland Section ol 
the American College. L. W. Bimestefer 
and Ernesto Davila Diaz and discussed 
many interesting aspects of dentistry 
in Puerto Rico. 

Elected 

The new officers of the American Acad- 
emy of the History of Dentistry include 
the following: President, Dean Harry 
B. McCarthy, '23, Dallas, Texas; Vice- 
President, Prof. Ciardner P. H. Foley, 
Honorary Member of the Alumni, Bal- 
timore; Secretary-Treasurer, Dr. Milton 
B. Asbell, '38, Camden, New Jersey. 



College of 

EDUCATION 



Mary J. A halt 



Staff on Leave 

Dr. Gladys A. Wiggin, Professor of 
Education, has been granted one year 
sabbatical leave in order to study Euro- 
pean systems of education. She will 
spend some time working with Univer- 
sity College Center in Heidelberg super- 
vising the education program overseas, 
and teaching a course in "The History 
of Education in the United States." Dr. 
Wiggin was the part-time Associate Di- 
rector of the College oi Special and 
Continuation Studies (now University 
College) when it was established by the 
University Board of Regents in 1947. 



University Credential Service 
Office 

The College of Education and the Ex- 
ecutive Dean for Student Life are 
pleased to announce the extension of 

(Continual on next page) 



January-February, 1961 



19 



its placement service to include a newly 
established University Credential Serv- 
ice Office. 

This office has been created to offer 
a professional placement service to grad- 
uates of the University of Maryland who 
are interested in teaching in the elemen- 
tary or secondary schools or at the col- 
lege level. It is hoped that graduate 
students pursuing advanced degrees, as 
well as undergraduate students prepared 
for teaching, will register with the office 
both for their first positions and for po- 
sitions offering professional advance- 
ment. 

Registration with the University Cre- 
dential Service will enable a registrant 
to establish a permanent credential file, 
notify them of vacancies in their area 
of preparation, arrange interviews with 
employing officials when possible, and 
supply credentials to persons seeking 
personnel upon either the employer's re- 
quest or the request of the registrant. 

Forms for registration may be ob- 
tained by writing or calling at the office 
in 108 Skinner Building. Mrs. Kathryn 
E. Walker, Coordinator of the Univer- 
sity Credential Service, will be pleased 
to discuss placement possibilities with 
interested persons. 

Numerous requests for personnel 
from schools, colleges and universities 
throughout the United States are re- 
ceived each year. In 1959-60 over 4,000 
vacancies were listed in the Education 
Placement Office. 



It is the desire of the University Cre- 
dential Service to serve the University, 
the registrant, and the employing official 
in a professional manner. 



Five Months in Europe 

The van Zwoll family embarked for 
Europe in March and arrived in The 
Hague, where they established residence, 
on April 10. The occasion was a Sab- 
batical Leave granted by the University 
of Maryland. The purpose was to ex- 
plore a facet of school building plan- 
ning in The Netherlands, Germany, 
Denmark, Sweden, Norway, and Switz- 
erland — countries regarded as having 
much in common with the United States 
in the regard given to the individual 
and to the educational and social insti- 
tutions maintained to serve him. 

The Ministries of Education in the 
respective countries were most helpful 
in making available information which 
established that where we generally plan 
ordinary classrooms with 30 square feet 
of area per pupil in the United States, 
the other countries provide different 
areas per pupil, ranging from 12.5 to 
23.5 square feet. Nevertheless it became 
evident that there is a principle com- 
mon to planning the general classroom 
in the European countries visited and 
in the United States; the principle that 
whatever the space per pupil, the goal 
should be more space per pupil. 



His visits to the several countries gave 
Dr. van Zwoll some perspective on the 
economic progress achieved through in- 
dustrialization — offsetting the loss of 
colonies — in the Netherlands; the pros- 
perity accompanying the industry of 
Germany; the lush fertility and extra- 
ordinary hospitality of Denmark and 
the broad streets and modernity of 
Kobenhavn; the resources and variety 
of landscape in Sweden; the ruggedly 
impressive mountains and fjords of Nor- 
way; and the contrasting mountain 
scenery of Switzerland. 

Inquiry into the organization and 
operation of higher education revealed 
a regard for this level of education ex- 
pressed through fine physical facilities, a 
pay level of $11,000 (equated to U. S. 
values) for professors' salaries, and the 
office of Rector Magnificus, reduced in 
ordinary usage to Rector. The Rector 
is about equivalent to a Dean on our 
campus and is elected for a one-year 
term by the faculty members among 
whom the office is rotated. His duties 
pertain almost entirely, it seems, to aca- 
demic matters. This office prevailed in 
The Netherlands and the Scandinavian 
countries. 



Dr. Kurtz Returns 

Dr. John L. Kurtz, Professor of Edu- 
cation, Institute for Child Study, re- 
turned to the campus in September 



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the Maryland Magazine 



after a sabbatical year as a Fulbright 
Lecturer in human development at the 
University of the Philippines, Graduate 
College of Education. While there he 
served as visiting lecturer and consultant 
to the faculty of three departments that 
expressed interest in adding human de- 
velopment to their curricular offerings 
— home economics, psychology and edu- 
cation. He also established an inter- 
departmental research committee which 
undertook various studies in achieve- 
ment at the University of the Philip- 
pines. The reports are to be published 
in the Philippines as a Monograph. 

Dr. Kurtz traveled the Islands from 
the north of Luzon to the south of 
Mindanao as a special consultant for 
the Bureau of Public Schools of the 
Republic of the Philippines. The pur- 
pose of this assignment was to evaluate 
the work of the eight regional Normal 
School Child Development Study Cen- 
ters and to help the local coordinators 
plan ways of enhancing their role in 
the regions they serve through research 
and in-service training. 

In the Philippines he served as con- 
sultant to the National Military Acad- 
emy. The immediate task was to de- 
termine causes of excessive student 
failure rate. The exploration involved 
a review of selection procedures, teach- 
ing methods, and staff-personnel rela- 
tionships. 



Contributions to Professional 
Publications 

Mrs. Ann Carr Waggoner, Graduate 
Assistant in the College of Education, 
contributed the following for publica- 
tion: "Venture Into Continuing Educa- 
tion" in the Junior College Journal, Vol. 
31, No. 1, September 1960, published 
by the American Association of Junior 
Colleges. Mrs. Waggoner, before coming 
to the University of Maryland, was 
Assistant to the Director, Evening Di- 
vision, and Director of Adult Educa- 
tion, at Manatee Junior College in Brad- 
enton, Florida. 

Dr. Dorothy Mohr, Professor of Phy- 
sical Education, has published in the 
Research Quarterly, Vol. 31, No. 2, May 
I960. The Quarterly is published by the 
American Association for Health, Phy- 
sical Education and Recreation, presents 
"The Contributions of Physical Activity 
to Skill Learning." Also, in The Physi- 
cal Education, published by Phi Epsilon 
Kappa Fraternity, she discusses "Inter- 
action Is a Group Process." 

Dr. Mohr has edited Physical Educa- 
tion for High School Students, pub- 
lished by the American Association for 
Health, Physical Education and Recre- 
ation, and has written with the coopera- 
tion of The Advisory Committee, the 

January-February, 1961 



Teachers Guide for Physical Education 
for High School Students. 

Dr. H. Gerthon Morgan, Professor 
and Director of the Institute lor ( bild 

Study, in the October I960 issue ol the 
NEA Journal gives his views on "How 
To Facilitate Learning." 

Mrs. Alphoretta Fish, a member of 
the stall' in elementary education, is in 
charge of reviewing the new science 
books for the magazine Childhood Edu- 
cation. Her reviews appear monthly in 
the magazine and she will be one of 
a committee to compile the new edition 
of A Bibliography of Hooks for Children 
published by the Association for Child- 



hood I ducation when it appears next 
year. 

Dr. Jean D. < Irambs, I ecturei in I du- 
cation, describes tomorrow's social stud- 
ies teacher in ( itizenship and n I *•< 

Society: Education foi the Future, the 
10th Yearbook ol the National < ouncil 

lor Social Studies. 

The first issue oi the Foreign Lan- 
guage Newsletter, edited bj Dr. Ileiir;. 
Mendeloll. Assistant I'rolessol ot I du 

cation and Foreign I anguages, and pub- 
lished under the auspices ol the ( ollege 

ol 1 ducation anil the Department ot 
(Continued on next page) 



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21 




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Foreign Languages appeared in Novem- 
ber. It will be published in November. 
February and May of each year as a 
sen ice to the teachers of foreign lan- 
guages in the public schools and col- 
leges of the State of Maryland. 



Participation in Meetings 

Dr. Roger Kclsey addressed the Novem- 
ber meeting of the Phi Delta Kappa Na- 
tional Professional Education Fraternity 
on the topic "Relation of Facilities and 
Personnel to Expected Needs in Mary- 
land^ Higher Education for the Com- 
ing Years." Dr. Kelsey, Lecturer in 
Education, began his duties with the 
College of Education in the field of 
higher education September 1, 1960. 

Dr. Donald Maley, Professor and 
Head of Industrial Education, recently 
was the principal speaker at the Iowa 
Industrial Education sectional meeting 
of the Iowa State Education Association 
held at Des Moines, Iowa. Dr. Maley 
spoke on the topic "Contemporary Pro- 
grams in Industrial Arts." 

Dr. Will J. Massey, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Education, addressed the 
Prince Georges County Reading Teach- 
ers on "What a Reading Program Should 
Do for the School." He has been elected 
as Second Vice President of the Mary- 
land Corrective and Remedial Reading 
Association. 

Dr. Orval Ulry, Professor of Educa- 
tion and Director of Summer School, 
gave an illustrated lecture at one of a 
series of in-service meetings for science 
teachers at Glen Burnie High School 
on the topic "Teaching for Reflective 
Thinking." 

James G. Brown, Instructor in the 
Department of Office Management and 
Techniques and a member of the Co- 
operating Staff of the College of Edu- 
cation, served as co-chairman of the 
Invitational Conference held at Teachers 
College, Columbia University on Octo- 
ber 7-8. Out of this conference, spon- 
sored by the Eastern Region of United 
Business Education Association, as a 
result of two days of group discussions 
and general meetings to coordinate the 
thinking of all groups, resolutions were 
developed. These will be used as a guide 
for business educators to develop a 
more meaningful program for all sec- 
ondary school youth so each student 
will leave high school understanding 
our economic system and its structure. 
"Developing Balance in the Business 
Hducation Program" was the theme of 
the conference attended by leading busi- 
ness educators from the East. 

Dr. L. Morris McClure, Assistant 
Dean of the College of Education pre- 
sided over the evening section of a meet- 
ing on supervision and curriculum de- 
velopment at the Maryland State Teach- 
ers Association Annual Meeting in Bal- 




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22 



the Maryland Magazine 



timore. Dr. Arthur W. Combs, Pro- 
fessor ot Education, University of 
Florida spoke on "A Look at Supervi- 
sory Problems." 

Baltimore City Chapter served as host 
to the Council for Exceptional Children 
for its conference this fall at which time 
Dr. Jean R. Hebeler, Assistant Professor 
and Coordinator of Special Education 
Programs, participated in a discussion 
led by Frederick M. McCutchen, St. 
John's Development Services, Washing- 
ton, D. C, on "Considerations in the 
Education of Brain Injured Mentally 
Retarded Children." The theme for the 
conference was "Our Changing World: 
Implications for the Exceptional Child 
and His Teacher." 

Dr. Vernon E. Anderson, Dean of 
the College of Education, was the main 
speaker at the luncheon meeting of the 
Maryland School Board Association's 
Third Annual Convention in Hagers- 
town. He presented the topic "Current 
Issues in the Curriculum." 

"The Educated Teacher" was the sub- 
ject presented by Dr. Anderson at the 
Maryland Education Conference in Bal- 
timore in November. 

Dr. Anderson was also one of the 
participants in the program of the Ninth 
Annual Meeting of the Council on Co- 
operation in Teacher Education held 
in Washington, D. C. 

Dr. Henry Mendeloff, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Education and Foreign Lan- 
guages, will lecture in Spanish before 
the Club of the Americas on "Some 
Aspects of the Evolution of Spanish as 
a Romance Language. 



Professional Activities 

The United States Office of Education 
has approved an education research 
project to run for 16 months to study 
and compare especially designed art 
activities with traditional art activities 
to use with mentally retarded children 
and youth. Dr. Jean R. Hebeler, Co- 
ordinator of Special Education in the 
College of Education, will direct this 
research. 

Dr. Glen O. Blough and Dr. Clarence 
Newell, both of the College of Educa- 
tion, were members of the accredita- 
tion team which evaluated the School 
of Education, University of Virginia, 
November 14-16, 1960. On the basis of 
the team's report the Middle States As- 
sociation of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools will decide on the accreditation 
status to be designated for the School 
of Education of the University of Vir- 
ginia. 

Dr. William F. Tierney, Associate 
Professor of Industrial Education, served 
as consultant for the two-day workshop 
activities for Home Economics teachers 
of Anne Arundel County. He worked 

(Continued on next page) 




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with the group in developing their skills 
and understanding in the field of up- 
holstering. Dr. Tierney is planning to 
follow-up this workshop by participat- 
ing in two other events later in the 
school year. 

Dr. John Lembach, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Art, on the cooperating staff 
of the College of Education, represented 
the University of Maryland as a con- 
sultant on art education at the Senior 
High School in Fairfax, Virginia. He 
presented "Trends in Secondary Educa- 
tion and Implications for the Arts" and 
"Problems of the Secondary Art 
Teacher, both presentations were fol- 
lowed by discussion. 

The Industrial Education Department 
is developing a "training aids labora- 
tory" and a "material testing center." 
The changes in the laboratory will 
greatly facilitate and improve the di- 
versity and quality of work that has 
been possible. The material testing cen- 
ter will be unique as a facility in Indus- 
trial Education Departments and at the 
same time indicates a move forward in 
providing teachers and programs for 
contemporary age. 

The Childhood Education Depart- 
ment under the direction of Dr. James 
Hymes, Jr., Professor of Education and 
Chairman of the Department, is plan- 
ning a series of thirty-three telecasts on 
the growth and development of young 
children entitled "Human Development 
I: The Child Under Six" over WTOP 
Channel 9 in Washington and WMAR, 
Channel 2 in Baltimore. The program 
will be presented on each Tuesday and 
Thursday morning beginning February 
7, 1961 from 6:30 to 7:00 a.m. This 
course may be taken for credit or stu- 
dents may register for the course for 
non-credit. A textbook will be available 
to all who register presenting the basic 
ideas that will be covered in the course. 

Dr. L. Morris McClure, Assistant 
Dean of the College of Education served 
as a member of the accreditation team 
to evaluate the College of Education 
at the University of Pittsburgh at the 
request of the Middle States Association 
of Colleges and Secondary Schools and 
the National Council for Accreditation 
of Teacher Education. 



Family Finance Workshops 

Dr. Arthur S. Patrick and Dr. Robert 
G. Risinger of the College of Education 
attended a Family Finance Workshop 
Coordinators Conference in Chicago, 
November 18-21, 1960. They met with 
the National Committee for Education 
in Family Finance and the Coordinators 
from seventeen universities in the 
United States. The purpose was to initi- 
ate plans for the workshop to be held 
during the regular Summer Session of 
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the Maryland Magazine 



The University of Maryland, under 
the directorship of Dr. Patrick and Dr. 
Risinger, has held six-week workshops 
on Education in Family Finance for the 
past three summers. These workshops 
are designed for secondary school 
teachers who desire to learn more about 
the areas in which families have finan- 
cial obligations. This includes insurance, 
banking, real estate, credit, and public 
and privately supported social security 
plans. Instructional materials appropri- 
ate for the grade level and subject mat- 
ter field are developed. 

These summer workshops are spon- 
sored by the Colleges of Education, 
Business and Public Administration and 
Home Economics in cooperation with 
the National Committee for Education 
in Family Finance and the Institute of 
Life Insurance. 



Student Honored 

At the first Honors Convocation of 
the University of Maryland, The Board 
of Regents and the President of the 
University presented Certificates of Dis- 
tinguished Scholarship to 79 students 
in the College of Education. 



College of 

ENGINEERING 

Presley A. Wedding 

E. E. Grads Initiated 

At the Fall initiation of Eta Kappa Nu, 
electrical engineering honor fraternity, 
Kenneth M. Uglow, '43 and Charles W. 
Hoffman, '49, were inducted. Mr. Uglow 
is Director of Research and Engineer- 
ing at Electro Mechanical Research, 
Inc., Sarasota, Florida. Mr. Hoffman is 
Engineer, Buildings Operations Group, 
American Telephone and Telegraph 
Company in New York. 

Society Chapters Commended 

Tau Beta Pi, National Engineering 
Honor Society, has named the Univer- 
sity of Maryland chapter (Maryland 
Beta) the outstanding chapter of the 
organization for the 1959-60 academic 
year. The award was made at the 75th 
Anniversary Convention of Tau Beta 
Pi at Lehigh University, Bethlehem, 
Pennsylvania, where the Association 
was founded in 1885. David C. Fullar- 
ton, President, accepted the award for 
the local chapter. 

(Continued on page 29) 



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transportation. More than all this, 
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to travel. On an average day, about 
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ten dollars a day. 

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licity, advertising and the steady work 
of state and travel industry groups. The 
rewards of travel promotion are great — 
unbelievably great. 

Maryland has much to offer the trav- 
eler — and a move is on to "sell 'em 
before they leave home." The necessity 
of making an impression on the traveler 
long before he gets into the family car 
will be apparent when one remembers 
that most itineraries are organized, not 
born of impulse. When unplanned side 
trips are made enroute, they are almost 
always to places the family has already 



Student's Supply Store 

University of Maryland 

College Park Md. 




Alumni 
Headquarters for 

• CLASS RINGS 

• CLOTH GOODS 

• ETCHED GLASSWARE 

• JEWELRY 

• STATIONERY 



26 



the Maryland Magazine 



Wi 



am&n 



heard about long before packing for 
the trip. Thus when Maryland can have 
the tools to do an effective prc-selling 
job, we can look forward to tapping the 
heavy flow of travel money that present- 
ly flows through our state without stop- 
ping. We can direct into our own state. 
for example, some of the four hundred 
million dollars that is spent each year 
in the nation's capital. 

Maryland offers many historical land- 
marks, including the Baltimore Harbor 
and Fort McHenry, the First Capital 
of the U. S. — our State House in An- 
napolis; the Cliffs of Calvert on the 
Bay; the Cypress Swamp on Pocomoke 
River; the Virgin Hemlock Forest of 
Garrett County; the world's largest 
Goldfish Pond in Frederick County; 
the Naval Academy at Annapolis; the 
First Cathedral in America at Balti- 
more; the First Railroad Station in 
America at Baltimore; the largest White 
Oak in America in Talbot County; the 
first Man of War in the U. S. Navy at 
Baltimore; historic homes and gardens 
throughout Maryland — just to name a 
few! 

In addition to its landmarks, natural 
beauty from every point of view, and 
its wonderful historical background, 
Maryland has fishing, hunting, sailing 
and boating facilities unequalled any- 
where, on the many magnificent rivers 
and in the largest inland Bay in the 
world at our doorsteps. These are tour- 
ist bait items many states would give 
their eyeteeth to have for promotion of 
travel business. 



First Name in Ice Cream 
For Over A Half Century 




We must keep in mind tli.it these 
attractions — and others in Maryland — 
are not familiar to a broad segment ol 
the traveling public, including our own 
citizens. And we must remember that 
other states have taken points ot less 
inherent value, and by dramatizing 
them, have turned them into first-rate 
drawing cards. It is a selling problem 
all down the line. 

Maryland must ^\o more travel pro- 
motion and increase its take from the 
footloose American family. The tourist 
dollar is a good dollar. It puts fresh 
money in the pockets of our citizens 
in almost every line. It puts money in 
the State Treasury and relieves Mary- 
landers' tax burden. 



Many industries can be attracted to 
Maryland if the promotion is done 
effectively. In Baltimore we have one 
of the most outstanding moving and 
transfer companies in the East — THE 
DAVIDSON TRANSFER & STOR- 
AGE COMPANY. It is equipped to 
handle big industry as well as personal 



The gathering [>lu( <■ for 
Marykmders of Good I "•>>>■ 




DUKE ZEIBERT'S 

RESTAURANT 

1730 L Street 

(Two doors west of Conn. Ave.) 

Sferling 3-1730 

Open 'til Midnight — Sunday 'III 10 p m 



oA 'Well Pressed ZMan HsDecm a Wat 

SOUTHCOMB 

MEN'S HATS 

STETSON HAT QUARTERS 

Stetson Tics 




109 E. BALTIMORE STREET 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



LExington 9-5799 




STEEL FABRICATING 
STEEL WAREHOUSING 



BALTIMORE 18, Maryland, HOpkins 7-9700 
WASHINGTON. D. C. (Silver Spring, Md.), Jl> 5-0855 
RALEIGH, N. C, 708 Insurance Bids.. TEmple 2-5G23 



CAMPUS 
TRADITIONS... 

Sunday services in the charming 
colonial-style chapel . . . and build- 
ings containing steel fabricated by 
Dietrich Brothers. (Yes, Dietrich 
Brothers provided the steel frame- 
work for the campus chapel, too.) 



When the job calls for steel . . . call 



DIETRICH 

BRflMRS 



January-February, 1961 



27 



# 



a* 



Man4fla*id Women 



belongings, in this move to attract busi- 
ness to our state. 

More and more homemakers are in- 
sisting on moving vans that are kept 
immaculately clean, before, during and 
after each transfer of furniture and 
household goods. The popularity of the 
Sanitized process, used by the folks of 
DAVIDSON TRANSFER & STOR- 
AGE CO. in Baltimore and Washington 
since 1948, recently resulted in an ex- 
pansion of this effective method of pro- 
tecting their equipment. 

Each Davidson van is subject to reg- 
ular inspection and treatment with the 
Sanitized material. This keeps mold, 
mildew, germs, etc. from accumulating 
during a move. It's a peace-of-mind 
method that Davidson is mighty proud 
to have pioneered. 



One of the most popular items ever 
to be printed by the MAURICE 
LEESER CO. of Baltimore is the six- 
color reproduction of the Great Seal 
of the State of Maryland. 

It was prepared by the Maryland 
State Department of Information back 
in 1957, and reproduced by craftsmen 
under the direction of Victor P. Skruck, 
president of the 52-year-old firm. 

Many of these 22 x 24-inch prints 
have been purchased for framing, and 



200 ROOMS 

Francis Scott Key Hotel 

Colonial Cocktail Lounge 
3 Restaurants 

Banquet Facilities 
Convention Facilities 

FREDERICK, MARYLAND 



are to be seen all over our fair Free 
State. 

Copies may be obtained at $3.00 
postpaid by writing the Maurice Leeser 
Co., 536 West Pratt Street, Baltimore 

1, Md. 

* * * 

Most visitors to our state will carry 
home gifts and be attracted by adver- 
tising. The MANO SWARTZ FUR- 
RIERS, a civic-minded and progressive 
firm, will attract many such visitors. 

The success of a business is not acci- 
dental. It comes mainly from pleasing 
customers. That is probably the biggest 
reason why Mano Swartz is Maryland's 
largest furrier. 

With their huge buying power, they 
are able to choose the finest furs at 
favorable prices, from America's top 
fur manufacturers. Their connections 
with American and Continental fur 
stylists enable them to offer the last 
word in fur styles. And, of course, their 
policy of attempting to sell the finest 
quality at the lowest possible price has 
even attracted many out-of-state fur 
buyers. 

The 72-year-old business is still owned 
and operated by James M. Swartz, son 
of the founder, Mano Swartz, and is 
located at 225 N. Howard St., in Balti- 
more. 



C*veru ZJaole \Jverlooni 
J-^ictureiaue K^ountruiiae 




tmSV& 



Oiney Inn 



"Old Plantation Recipes" 

LUNCHEON - DINNER 
COCKTAILS 

Noon to 9:30 P.M. Daily 

(Closed Mondays) 

ACCOMMODATIONS FOR 

BRIDGE PARTIES. WEDDINGS, 

BANQUETS, CLUB MEETINGS 

ON STATE ROUTE 97 
OLNEY, MARYLAND 

— Ample Parking Space — 
PHONE Whitehall 6-5757 

Gertrude Allison Brewster, Owner 



Subscribe to 

MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



ARUNDEL FEDERAL SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION 



Organized 1906 



direct reduction home loans 
savings accounts - liberal dividends 



Insured up to $10,000 by the Federal 
Savings and Loan Insurance Corp. 

Christmas Clubs — Safe Deposit Boxes 

Community Hall for Rent 

Hours: 

9 to 2 daily 

7 to 9 Tuesday evening 




j?£i- W 



PATAPSCO AVENUE & FOURTH STREET 
Baltimore 25, Md. ELgin 5-9300 



^ 



"Washington's Best Restaurant" 
Holu/j\ MigJtin* ( uh Ccntccucivv Year) 

"One of America's Ten Best" 

fcjfiotul Poll 

OCCIDENTAL 

Where Statesmen Dine 

1411 Pennsylvania Ave. N.W. 

Between ihr Washinglon & Willord Molds 

Open Doily & Sunday 11:30 A.M. -1:00 AM 
Telephone 01. 7-6467 



Five Beautifully Appointed Room'. Catc 






nq To Parties, Meetings And Banquets 
Established For Over 100 v P „ rs 



*}> 



10 To 250 Persons. 



2H 



the Maryland Magazine 



Engineering 

Continued from page 25 



Maryland was chosen from among 
103 undergraduate chapters on the basis 
of excellence of the chapter activities, 
projects and reports to the National 
Office. Louisiana Polytechnic Institute, 
the University of Rochester and the 
University of Texas received Honorable 
Mentions. 

In addition to the 27 undergraduate 
members, 39 members of the College 
of Engineering are alumnus members 
of the Society: Dean Russell B. Allen 
of the College of Engineering is the 
senior faculty adviser of the chapter. 

The University of Maryland Student 
Chapter of the American Society of 
Civil Engineers has received a Certifi- 
cate of Commendation from the parent 
society for the calendar year 1959. This 
distinction was awarded to the top three 
chapters in the Middle Atlantic Region 
which includes 28 schools in Maryland, 
Delaware, New Jersey, West Virginia, 
Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana and Michi- 
gan. The award is based on the excel- 
lence of reports, meeting activities and 
projects, and faculty interest as evidenced 
by cooperation with the chapter and 
attendance at meetings. Professor Harry 
W. Piper is faculty advisor. 



Grads Give Career Advice 

Maryland graduates made significant 
contributions to a "career week forum" 
recently held in the Engineering Class- 
room Building. Clifford M. Stretmaler, 
'59, C.E., outlined the career possibili- 
ties in the field of Civil Engineering. 
Currently, he is resident engineer on 
the rebuilding of the east front of the 
capitol in Washington for the Charles 
H. Tompkins Co. builders. 

Andrew B. Beveridge, E.E. '36, spoke 
on "Engineering as a Preparation for 
Other Fields." After graduation he was 
employed by General Electric Co. for 
a time. Returning to school, he earned 
his law degree and is now a practicing 
patent attorney in Washington, D. C. 



Wins Recognition 

William P. Deavers, Jr., M.E. '51, is 
working for Space Technology Labora- 
tories, Inc. He has been engaged in 
work on weapons for anti-submarine 
warfare. His present assignment involves 
research and development for the Min- 
uteman missile propulsion. He is a re- 
cipient of the Navy's Meritorious Civil- 
ian Service Award. 

{Continued on next page) 



TV time is time for Coke! 




When someone slips out 

between two of your favorite programs 

find comes back with frosty bottles 

of ice-cold Coke for everyone 

. . . the whole family brightens! 

Bring home the Coke . . . today! 



Bottled under authority of The Coca-Cola Company by 
THE WASHINGTON COCA-COLA BOTTLING COMPANY 
Silver Spring, Md. 




TOWN HALL TAVERN 

TO 9-5814 

Closest Establishment to the Campus 

Mixed Drinks Delicious Pizza 

8135 Baltimore Blvd. ample parking College Park, Md. 



FRANK B. JONES 

OPTICIAN 

Over 30 Years Experience 

Dispensing and Manufacturing 
Modern Eye Wear 

Complete Optical Laboratory 
on Premises 

JUniper 9-8780 

8482 Fenton St. Silver Spring, Md. 



THE — 

LORD CALVERT 
HOTEL AND COTTAGES 

^Triencllii ^rtosti 



lj< 



our 



"J 



.lust eiliht miles from W;-hin<rton, 
near the University of Maryland, 
you'll find complete comfort and 
conveniences. 

Phone AP 7-4493 
For Reservation* 

Free T\' — Free Parking 

On U. S. Highway No. 1 
7200 BALTIMORE AVENUE 
COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



January-February, 1961 



29 



THE SITE 
FOR SAVERS 




Where Generous Dividends 

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Quarterly! 

District 7-2370 

TIieKrstIjIderal 

inWashington 

FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS \M> LOAN 

ISSOCIATION ((I WASHINGTON 

610 — 13th Street, N.W. 

Bethesda Branch 
8216 Wisconsin Avenue 



Ottenberg s Bakers, 
Inc. 

Qjalily Bakers 
For Three Generations 




RESTAURANTS 



INSTITUTIONS 



Lincoln 7-6500 
Washington, D. C. 



Give To Fight Cancer! 



Faculty Notes 

The end of October, 1960 signaled the 
retirement of Dr. Wilbert J. Huff, Pro- 
lessor of Chemical Engineering and 
Head of the Department. Before com- 
ing to Maryland in 1937, Dr. Huff 
served as Professor of Gas Engineering 
at Johns Hopkins University. He was 
Chief Chemist in charge of the Ex- 
plosives Division of the U. S. Bureau 
of Mines and during World War II 
served on several Government boards 
dealing with the use and storage of 
explosives. He has made numerous con- 
tributions to the technical and scientific 
literature in the areas of chemistry, en- 
gineering fuels and explosives. 

In addition to his departmental re- 
sponsibilities. Dr. Huff was Director of 
the Engineering Experiment Station and 
chairman, Division of Physical Sciences. 
He is a member of a number of honor- 
ary and professional societies, Sigma 
Xi, Alpha Chi Sigma, Tau Beta Pi, Phi 
Kappa Phi, American Chemical Society, 
American Society for Engineering 
Education and the American Associa- 
tion of University Professors. His 
academic achievements include the A.B. 
degree from Ohio Northern University 
in 1911, A.B. from Yale College 1914, 
Ph.D. from Yale University, 1917, and 
D.Sc. (Hon.) Ohio Northern Univer- 
sity in 1927. 

Dr. William A. Pennington, Professor 
of Chemical Engineering, has been 
elected president of the American So- 
ciety for Metals for the year 1960-61. 
Dr. Pennington is a graduate of Union 
University and Iowa State College and 
in line with his interest in metallurgy 
now leads one of the foremost metal- 
lurgical societies in the world. 



Here and There 

Larry Jones, C.E. '60, and Gerry Longa- 
necker, C.E. (B.S. '54, M.S. '55) are 
currently with the National Aeronautics 
and Space Administration (NASA) at 
Greenbelt. Larry has been a roving 
liaison engineer concerned with the con- 
struction of missile tracking stations and 
Gerry is project coordinator at head- 
quarters. 

Stanley Green, C.E. '57, has just re- 
turned as Lt. (j.g.) from three years 
and a few months active service with 
the Navy. After O.C. school in New- 
port, Rhode Island, he underwent fur- 
ther training at Port Hueneme, Cali- 
fornia, and then was assigned to service 
in the Civil Engineer Corps in Hawaii 
and other Pacific Islands. There he 
worked as engineering officer on various 
construction projects. 

Somayajulu Durvasula, M.S. Aero- 
nautical Engineering 1960, is lecturer 
in the Department of Aeronautical En- 



HARVEY DAIRY 

BRENTWOOD, MD. 

SERVING PRINCE GEORGES 
and MONTGOMERY COUNTIES 

r"our Neighbors 
Buy Our Milk 



Vitamin D Homogenized Milk 

Grade A Pasteurized Milk 

Extra Rich Homogenized 

Vitamin D Milk 

Cultured Buttermilk 

Fat Free Milk 

Chocolate Milk 

Butter-Sweet Cream 

Cottage Cheese 

Eggs — Strictly Fresh 

Half and Half 

Sour Cream 

Table Cream 

Whipping Cream 

Margarine 

Fresh Orange Juice 



APpleton 7-3434 



Choice of Maryland 

Suburban Residents 

Since 1927 



-SmiTH WELDING I 

COMPANY, INC. 

PORTABLE EQUIPMENT 

Phone UNion 4-2055 

4803 Rhode Island Ave. 

Hyattsville, Md. 



WINDOW - ON - THE ■ KITCHEN 

KUcltetesUa 

SELF-SERVICE 
Delicious food ... All our desserts are 
home-made popular prices . . 

no tipping . . . air conditioned 

BREAKFAST - LUNCHEON 

DINNER Quality Coffee 5c a cup 

Open Daily and Sunday 

1 1 th Street Entrance of 

HOTEL HARRINGTON 

11th & E Stt., N.W. Washington, D.C. 



30 



the Maryland Magazine 



gineering at the Indian Institute of Sci- 
ence, Bangelore. His address is 5/391 
Assam Gardens, Visaklepatuam 4, India. 

Gerald Connor, C.E. '59, is now with 
the Minneapolis-Honeywell Regulator 
Co., Microswitch Division. 

John M. Copauts, M.E. '59, is now 
second lieutenant in the Air Force. He 
is stationed overseas with the 7424th 
Support Squadron. His principal respon- 
sibility is that of Motor Vehicle Main- 
tenance Engineering Officer. 

H. Russell Knust, M.E. '40, is Assist- 
ant General Manager of Bethlehem 
Steel's Sparrows Point Plant. He is quite 
active in civic affairs, including service 
on Baltimore's Board of Education. 



Colonel Saunders Honored 

Colonel O. H. Saunders, a Civil Engi- 
neering graduate of the Class of 1910, 
was presented a distinguished service 
award at the University Honors Convo- 
cation on October 28. Among other 
things, Colonel Saunders was cited for 
his extensive participation in alumni 
affairs as president of the Engineering 
Alumni Associations of both the Uni- 
versity and College of Engineering. He 
was the ranking graduate of his class 
and the first candidate from the old 
Maryland Agricultural College to take 
the examination for appointment to the 
Army as a Second Lieutenant. His mili- 
tary service included tours of duty in 
the United States, Hawaii, the Philip- 
pines, China, Africa, Italy, France and 
Germany. Not the least of his achieve- 
ments was his service as Maryland's 
first drum major. 



Dr. A. R. T. Denues was incorrectly 
identified as Dr. Dennes in the Sep- 
tember-October issue, page 48. 



College of 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Rosa Lee Kime 

Dietitian 

Ellen Kirby Coale, '58, is serving as 
Assistant Therapeutic Dietitian at De- 
Paul Hospital in Norfolk, Virginia. 

Textiles and Clothing 

Members of the textiles and clothing 
faculty are participating in a series of 
conferences with Air Force staff on 
problems of alteration and redesigning 
of the skirts of standard uniforms. 

(Continued on next page) 




MASSEY- FERGUSON, INC 

BALTIMORE BRANCH 

YORK & TIMONIUM ROADS 
TIMONIUM, MARYLAND 

Look For our Local Deafer in Your Community 





Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co. 
Silver Hill Concrete Co. 






Phone 

for 

CONCRETE 

RE 
5-3000 


Producers and Distributors of 

WASHED SAND & GRAVEL 
TOP SOIL • ROAD GRAVEL 
READY-MIXED CONCRETE 


Phone 

for 

SAND & 

GRAVEL 

RE 
5-3000 








WASHINGTON 20. D.C. 







THE Travel Everywhere — 

KAFTDf^Dni IT A K.I B ^ Steamer ... by Airline ... by Rail 

IVXC I KUrULI I MIN Independent and Conducted Tours 

! UU K I b I L.CJAAr/\N I Personalized Travel Service Since 1923 

1115 N. Charles Street — Baltimore 1, Maryland * LExington 9-7300 







THE 


BALTIMORE ENVELOPE 


CO. 










MANUFACTURERS AND PRINTERS OF ENVELOPES 












1020 WEST PRATT STREET 








Phone 


MUlberry 


5-6070 




Baltimore 


23. 


Md. 



ALCAZAR 

CATHEDRAL and MADISON STS. 

Phone VErnon 7-8400 

Baltimore, Md, 

' il l lii i ill l ll ll il li l i 



(J->arcl-sMvon School 

Secretarial - Dramatic Art and Radio 

Day and Evening 

805 N. Charles St. VE. 7-1155 

Baltimore, Md. 



January-February, 1961 



31 



Helms Concrete 
Pipe Co. 

Alexandria, Va. 




Thomas E. Carroll 
6l Son 

LANDSCAPE CONTRACTING 
Tree Moving 



Trees 

Sodding 



Shrubs 
Grading 

EVergreen 4-6400 

15710 Colesville Road 
SILVER SPRING. MARYLAND 



Over Half Century of Continuous Service 

R. B. PHELPS 
STONE CO. 

CUT STONE CONTRACTORS 

Limes/one 
Granite Marble 

NOrth 7-1508 2501 Ninth St., N.E. 

Washington 18, D. C. 



S. A. FREAS & CO. 

Fruits and Produce 

1338 5th St. N.E. 
Washington, D. C. 



Faculty Addition 

Mrs. Louise Johnson has joined the staff. 
She comes to the University from the 
University of Connecticut where she 
served for the past four years. Her hus- 
band until recently was the Dean of 
Men at the University of Connecticut. 



School of 

LAW 

Dr. G. Kenneth Reiblich 



Law Seminar 

A series of six weekly seminars for 
lawyers, dealing with "Functional Men- 
tal Disorders," was conducted by fac- 
ulty members of the Baltimore Psycho- 
analytic Institute ending on November 
15. 

The first of the seminars was held 
at The Psychiatric Institute of the 
School of Medicine. 

In announcing the new seminar series, 
Prof. L. Whiting Farinholt, Jr., Pro- 
fessor of Law at the School of Law 
and Director of the Maryland Medico- 
Legal Institute, explained that it grew 
out of a course, "Basic Psychiatry for 
Lawyers," that the Medico-Legal Insti- 
tute held last March at The Psychiatric 
Institute. 

Owing to the interest in psychiatric 
study that was stimulated at the March 
course, the seminar series, limited to 
fifteen, was oversubscribed. 



Student Excels 

George Felkenes, third year student at 
the University of Maryland School of 
Law, has been appointed Chairman of 
the Armed Services Committee of the 
American Law Student Association. 

Mr. Felkenes, from Dayton, Ohio, is 
also President of the Student Bar As- 
sociation at the law school. 



School of 
MEDICINE 

Dr. John Wagner 



Hecht Building Construction 
Advances 

Dean Stone has recently announced the 
approval of the conversion plans for 
the Hecht building with a total of 
$795,350 scheduled for the Federal 
contribution, an equivalent amount to 
be appropriated from State of Maryland 
sources. The Federal grant must have 



Why 




is 



mnRvinnos fihest conn 

Mitchell's Premium Corn tastes like 
it was just cut from the cob . . . the 
result of Mitchell's own process- 
ing that cooks and seals the 
corn in cans with- 
in the hour it is: 
pulled from the 
stalk. 



$IM2^ 



SHOE PEG 



WHOLE KERNEL 
WHITE SWEET CORN 




GOLDEN 



SWEET 



— Packed by — 

F. 0. miTCHELL & BR0., Inc. 

FERRYMAN, MD • KENNED YVILLE, MD 

Main Office, Perryman, Md. 
Phone CR 2-3636 



DUCKWORTH 
ROOFING 
CO., Inc. 

SLAG ROOFING 

Repairing — Painting 
METAL WORK 



NOrth 7-0336 

2253 SHERMAN AVE., N.W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



PESTS? 



TERMITES? 




C. Walter Porter, Mgr. 

SAratoga 7-6118 
22 W. FRANKLIN STREET 

Baltimore 1, Md. 



32 



the Maryland Magazine 



final approval of the Surgeon General 
of the Public Health Service and the 
matching funds, of course, must be ap- 
propriated through legislative act. 

The more than one and a half million 
dollars will be used to convert the ex- 
isting structure into two primary facili- 
ties; the first being adequate laboratory 
space for research and for multi-purpose 
laboratories for the basic science in- 
struction in the School of Medicine. 

When completed, the conversion will 
allow the use of new techniques in teach- 
ing the basic sciences and will involve 
the construction of at least three special 
laboratories to be used by first and sec- 
ond year students. In these laboratories 
each student will have an assigned area 
consisting of a desk, equipment for re- 
search, and work space available to him 
at all hours. This will mean that the 
students can conduct experimental work 
in research in one place instead of many 
different laboratories scattered through- 
out the campus. In addition to the multi- 
purpose laboratories, each department 
(Pathology, Microbiology, Biochemistry, 
Pharmacology, and Physiology) will 
have rooms adjacent to the main labora- 
tories where special equipment, exhibits, 
materials, and special apparatus can be 
installed or prepared, ready to move 
into the multi-purpose laboratory as the 
type of instruction changes from day to 
day. Thus, it will be possible to provide 
a greater degree of coordinate labora- 
tory instruction, a greater integration 
of the basic sciences and, of course, a 
much finer opportunity for original stu- 
dent research and development. 

In addition to the multi-purpose lab- 
oratories, each department will have a 
section devoted to departmental re- 
search. There will be special apparatus 
rooms, animal rooms, and adjunct fa- 
cilities. It is also planned that the newly 
created Department of Biophysics will 
occupy quarters in this building. 

The remainder of the available space 
will serve to consolidate the business 
offices of the University and the plant 
maintenance departments, now scattered 
widely throughout the Baltimore campus 
buildings. 

If plans progress according to sched- 
ule, anticipated occupancy will be some- 
time during 1963. 



Postgraduate Committee Gets 
New Head 

Dr. Patrick B. Storey, formerly of the 
United States Veterans Administration 
Hospital in Baltimore, has been ap- 
pointed Associate Professor of Medicine 
and Chairman of the Postgraduate Com- 
mittee. Dr. Storey will direct the post- 
graduate program at the School of Medi- 
cine, replacing Dr. Howard M. Bubert 

(Continued on next page) 



Moving with Care, Everywhere 
by Land \ by Sea \ by Air 



l od— W 



DflVIDSOIX 

TRANSFER & STORAGE CO. 



• Pre-Planned Moving to take many details off your hands 

• Nation-Wide and World-Wide Service thru United Van Lines 

• Sanitized Vans, protected against germs, insects, odors 

• Saf-T-Pak, cleanest, safest method for fragile goods 

• Palletized Storage, each lot in clean, mobile containers 
BALTIMORE • BRoadway 6-7900 WASHINGTON • LAwrence 9-2700 




OLES 



ENVELOPE CORPORATION 



Jjalllmore $ 1 ioneer Onvelope ^Manufacturer 

Established 1912 

Office and Factory: 25th STREET & LOCH RAVEN ROAD 

Baltimore 18, Maryland CHesapeake 3-1520 

Washington Sales Office: 2003 QUE STREET, N.W. 
Washington 9, D. C. ADams 4-3979 



WILLIAMS 




CONSTRUCTION 




COMPANY 




INC. 




General Contractors 




Highways — Bridges — Airports 




Phone MUrdock 


BALTIMORE, 


6-1000 


MD. 





OLSEN EQUIPMENT COMPANY 

Engineered Equipment, Casters, Trucks, 
Conveyors and Fiberglas Products 

Portable Commercial Kitchen Equipment 

961 North Hill Rd. CH 3-6793 

Baltimore 18, Md. SA 7-8666 

Branch Office: Washington, D. C. STerting 3-3480 



January-February, 1961 



33 



In Orbit! 




World Tours 

Launch yourself on a trip that 
makes the Big Circuit. See 
everything: Honolulu, Tokyo, 
Hong Kong, Calcutta, Taj Ma- 
hal, Cairo, Athens, Rome, etc. 

Blast-off eight times a year. 
By air or by steamer. Start 
your count-down by getting 
Brownell folders from: 

World Wide Travel 
Serviee Corp. 

MERCURY BUILDING 

20th & K Sts. N.W. 
WASHINGTON 6, D. C. 
Phone: FEderal 3-9373 



MILLER and 
LONG CO., Inc. 

Concrete Construction 

5506 Connecticut Ave., N.W. 
Washington 15, D. C. 



Anchor Fence 

Anchor Post Products, Inc. 

1317 Half St., S.E. 

Lincoln 3-8151 

Virginia residents JEfferson 4-1110 

Northwest and suburban . LOckwood 5-3556 

Baltimore MEdford 3-6500 

Towson VAIley 5-7133 

Glen Burnie SOuthfield 1-0550 

Annapolis COIonial 8-3451 

OFFICES: 

THE DISTRICT, VIRGINIA, 

MARYLAND 



who has been named Advisor to the 
Committee. 

Dr. Storey is a graduate of George- 
town University School of Medicine, re- 
ceiving his internship and basic train- 
ing in pulmonary diseases at the Dis- 
trict of Columbia General Hospital. 

After service at the Fitzsimons Army 
Hospital, in 1955 he was appointed 
staff physician of the Baltimore Vet- 
erans Administration Hospital. The next 
year he became Chief of the Medical 
Service and in 1958 he was named 
Director of Professional Services. He 
has been Assistant Professor of Medi- 
cine at the University of Maryland and 
the Johns Hopkins University School of 
Medicine. Dr. Storey is a Diplomate of 
the American Board of Internal Medi- 
cine, the American Board of Pulmonary 
Diseases and is an associate of the 
American College of Physicians, as well 
as holding fellowship in the American 
College of Chest Physicians. He has 
served on numerous governmental com- 
mittees relating to the chemotherapy 
of tuberculosis. 



Department of Pathology Receives 
A. E. C. Grant 

An award of $10,000.00 from the 
United States Atomic Energy Commis- 
sion to the Department of Pathology of 
the School of Medicine has been recently 
announced. With the aid of the new 
equipment purchased through this grant, 
a training program under the direction 
of Dr. Lester Kiefer, Assistant Professor 
of Pathology, will expand the course of 
study to include now active experimental 
work concerning the biological effects 
of radiation. 

The experimental approach to the 
study of pathology, which Dr. Kiefer 
introduced to the curriculum in 1956, 
has been highly successful in encourag- 
ing medical students to study pathologi- 
cal processes in living tissues as a con- 
tinuous biologic process. With the new 
equipment purchased through the grant, 
the students will now be able to observe 
the continuing effects of radiation and 
its effects on tissues. In addition, radio- 
isotope techniques will be made avail- 
able not only for basic training but for 
research projects now in the planning 
stage. 



Maryland Senior Wins National 
Prize 

Martha Stauffer, a member of the senior 
class (1960) at the School of Medicine, 
was the winner of the 1960 Student 
Prize-Essay Competition of the New 
England Journal of Medicine. Dr. Stauf- 
fer's prize-winning essay reported the 
clinical and biochemical features of a 



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34 



the Maryland Magazine 



fatal case of oxalosis, a rare and little- 
known disorder. The case will be pub- 
lished in a forthcoming number of the 
New England Journal of Medicine. A 
cash award of $200.00 was included in 
the honor. 



Bloedorn Lectures in 
South America 

Dr. Fernando G. Bloedorn, Associate 
Professor of Radiology, School of Medi- 
cine, departed November 22 for South 
America, where he has been invited to 
lecture in Rio de Janeiro and San Pablo, 
Brazil; Montevideo, Uruguay; and 
Buenos Aires and Rosario, Argentina. 

Dr. Bloedorn, who heads the Division 
of Radiotherapy, was notified this week 
of his unanimous election to member- 
ship in the Club de Telecobaltherapie, 
with headquarters in Paris. The Club, 
whose membership is limited to 20, is 
made up of radiotherapists who are try- 
ing to develop new techniques for the 
treatment of cancer by cobalt. 

Fondation Curie in Paris has also in- 
vited Dr. Bloedorn to contribute a re- 
port on interstitial radium treatment to 
a book on radiotherapy for publication 
early next year. 



Toxicity Studied 

The U. S. Army Chemical Corps has 
contracted with the Division of Legal 
Medicine of the University of Maryland 
School of Medicine to investigate the 
toxicity of a number of commonly used 
military chemicals and in particular cer- 
tain materials used as propellants for 
rockets and planes. 

The investigation covered by the 
$45,000 contract will be directed by Dr. 
Charles S. Petty, Assistant Professor 
of Forensic Pathology at the Medical 
School, working with five professional 
assistants. 

Animal experiments will be performed 
in an effort to identify toxic agents in 
body fluids and correlate these findings 
with any symptoms that may be pro- 
duced by the toxic agents. It is hoped 
that results of the study will prove use- 
ful to people who manufacture and 
handle the materials involved. 



Dr. Michaelis Completes Tour 

Dr. Moritz Michaelis, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Surgery, has returned from 
Europe and the Middle East, where he 
lectured on the enzymological aspects 
of shock at a meeting of the British 
Biochemical Society in Cambridge, at 
Hebrew University in Jerusalem, and at 
the Beilinson Hospital and Research In- 
stitute of Petach Tikvah, Israel. 

(Continued on next page) 



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College of 

PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION, 
RECREATION 
AND HEALTH 

Dean Lester Fraley 

Faculty Professional Activities 

The staff of this college have been en- 
gaged in numerous and varied activities 
which reflect a high degree of profes- 
sional interest and leadership. 

Dr. Marvin H. Eyler was Chairman 
of the Publicity and Hospitality Com- 
mittee for the College Physical Educa- 
tion Association convention held in De- 
cember in Washington, D. C. Dr. Eyler 
is Chairman-elect of the Professional 
Education Section of the Eastern Dis- 
trict Association of the American As- 
sociation for Health, Physical Educa- 
tion, and Recreation. 

Dean Lester M. Fraley attended the 
American School Health Association 
convention in San Francisco from Octo- 
ber 27 to October 3 1 . 

Dr. James H. Humphrey was in 
charge of preparing the program for 
the Research Council of the American 
School Health Association at its annual 
Fall convention in San Francisco. 

Miss Dorothy Madden was a delegate 
to the White House Conference on Chil- 
dren and Youth, representing the Na- 
tional Council on Arts and Education. 
Miss Madden is Chairman-elect of the 
National Section on Dance, American 
Association for Health, Physical Educa- 
tion and Recreation. Miss Madden per- 
formed in both the Ethel Butler Dance 
Group and the Pola Nirenska Company 
during the Spring of 1960. 

Dr. Ellen E. Harvey was Chairman 
of one of the sessions of the recent Na- 
tional Recreation Congress held in 
Washington, D. C. 

Miss Margaret Tifft is at present Vice- 
president, Health Education Section of 
the Maryland Association for Health, 
Physical Education and Recreation. 

Dr. Dorothy Mohr is serving as the 
Chairman of a special committee of the 
Research Council, American Association 
for Health, Physical Education and Rec- 
reation set up to establish norms for 
college women on the AAHPER Youth 
Fitness Test. She is a representative for 
District Two on the Maryland State 
Committee of the National Division of 
Girl's and Women's Sports, American 



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38 



the Maryland Magazine 



Association for Health, Physical Edu- 
cation and Recreation. 

Dr. Warren Johnson, Dr. James Hum- 
phrey, and Miss Josephine Ciaines at- 
tended the three-day Teacher Institute 
on the Science of Health Education held 
at the National Education Association 
headquarters and the National Insti- 
tues of Health in June 1960. 

Dr. Warren Johnson is serving as a 
member of the Professional Advisory 
Committee of the Montgomery County 
Special Education Divisions. Dr. John- 
son has among numerous papers pre- 
sented "An Approach to Attitude Stud- 
ies in Health and Physical Education" 
at the Eastern District Association of 
the American Association for Health, 
Physical Education and Recreation; and 
"Effects of Stereotyped Hypnotic and 
Post-Hypnotic Suggestions on Strength, 
Power and Endurance" at the National 
Convention of the American Associa- 
tion for Health, Physical Education and 
Recreation. 

Dr. Dorothy Deach served as the 
representative of the National Associa- 
tion for Physical Education of College 
Women at the American Association for 
Health, Physical Education and Recre- 
ation, National Conference for City and 
County Directors, Supervisors and Co- 
ordinators held in Washington, D. C. 
this Winter. On October 10, she was a 
consultant and speaker for Prince 
Georges County In-Service Training 
Program. 

Miss Josephine Gaines is serving as 
Vice-president of Health, District of Co- 
lumbia College Health Association; and 
as Secretary of the Profession Educa- 
tion Section of the Eastern District As- 
sociation of the American Association 
for Health, Physical Education and 
Recreation. 

Dr. Josephine Hubbell served as a 
consultant on the Program and Cur- 
riculum of Health Education at Mount 
Vernon Junior College in October. 

Miss Louise Howarth, Miss Eleanor 
Sanderson, and Miss Joy Freundschuh 
attended the Fall Conference of the 
Eastern Association for Physical Edu- 
cation of College Women. 

Miss Louise Howarth spent her 
Spring sabbatical on a freighter voyage 
around the world. 

Dean L. M. Fraley is Chairman-elect 
for the Professional Education Section 
of the American Association for Health 
Physical Education and Recreation. He 
is also Chairman of the Dean's Section 
of the AAHPER. 

Dean L. M. Fraley has been invited 
to give a series of lectures at the Fourth 
International Course for the Improve- 
ment of Professors of Physical Educa- 
tion to be held in Buenos Aires, Argen- 
tina. He has also been asked to give a 
series of lectures to the Professors of 
Physical Education of Peru, Chile and 
Uruguay, South America. 

(Continued on next page) 



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39 



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Major Anderson Commended 

Major Kenneth K. Anderson, '54, has 
received the Air Force Commendation 
Medal for distinguished service in finan- 
cial management activities at a Florida 
Air Base prior to his recent assignment 
to the 16th Air Force headquarters in 
Spain. 

Major Anderson was cited for his 
considerable contribution to the effec- 
tive management of the division through 
demonstration of keen analysis and fore- 
sight in directing the comptroller 
activity. 



Capper Receives Oak Leaf Cluster 

Major Randolph B. Capper, '60, re- 
cently received an Oak Leaf Cluster to 
the Army Commendation Medal. An 
Oak Leaf Cluster is given for each ad- 
ditional award of the ribbon after the 
initial presentation. 

Major Capper received the award for 
his outstanding performance of duties 
as procurement staff officer of the 
Mannheim, Germany zone. 



Fund Receives Scholarship 

An endowed scholarship has been estab- 
lished at the University of Maryland by 
the Air Force Warrant Officers Asso- 
ciation. 

Chief Warrant Officers Howard Rad- 
ford, Association President, and Iver- 
son Gallihugh, Treasurer, and other 
members of the National Executive 
Council made the presentation during 
a brief ceremony at College Park. 

"We know of no way which the ideals 
of our organization can be better per- 
petuated than through aid to worthy 
students," Chief Radford said. 

In accepting the gift H. Palmer Hop- 
kins, Chairman of the University's Com- 
mittee on Scholarships and Grants-in- 
aid, told the Council that over the years 
the endowment would provide financial 
assistance needed by so many students. 



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HOSPITAL 
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MUlberry 5-2847 
Baltimore 2, Md. 



Del Haven White House Motel 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 

Baltimore-Washington Boulevard 

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AAA — Duncan Hines — Restaurant 

Heat — Air Conditioning — Free TV 

Room Phones GRanite 4-6B65 



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Gray Concrete Pipe Co. 

Manufacturers of 

Concrete Pipe 

6315 EASTERN AVENUE 

Baltimore 24, Md. 



40 



the Maryland Magazine 



"Over one-half of the students who 
are qualified to go to college cannot 
afford the costs," he said. 

Sons and daughters of chief warrant 
officers will he given preference for the 
scholarship which will be first awarded 
in 1965. 



AF Doctor Completes Space 
Travel Report 

Air Force's bioastronautics food expert, 
Lt. Col. Albert A. Taylor, who is doing 
work at the University of Maryland, 
has just completed a magazine-form re- 
port on "Food for Space Travel." 

Colonel Taylor, whose training in- 
cludes a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine 
degree at Washington State University, 
Pullman, Washington, 1937, is Chief 
of the Biomedical Division, Director- 
ate of Life Sciences, Assistant for Bio- 
astronautics, Headquarters Air Research 
and Development Command, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

Dr. Taylor"s report gives primary 
consideration for the spaceman and pre- 
sents a complete program for providing 
food and water for manned space flights 
of durations of three days to several 
months. 

"During flights which are of sufficient 
duration to require food," Colonel Tay- 
lor wrote, "the astronaut will travel 
alone in a biopack (the capsule which 
includes all systems necessary to main- 
tain life and the man). A storage com- 
partment for food, water and small 
items of equipment will be necessary." 

Last spring Colonel Taylor drank 
water from a squeeze tube and ate solid 
foods while weightless. This experiment 
was done in an F-104 interceptor while 
flying a parabolic arc so that centrifugal 
force just equals the pull of gravity. 
From this study it was shown that man 
can eat and drink while weightless. 



SOCIAL NOTES 



Marriages 

Nancy Parker to Paul S. Frank, Jr., 

'58, on June 19, 1960. 
Virginia Bennett, '51, to John Waldo 

Sheldon on September 24, 1960. 
Suzanne F. Dahlin, '59, to James E. 

Merna, '57, on April 23, 1960. 
Susan Joy Margolin. '58, to Howard B. 

Silverman, on July 3, 1960. 
Sandra Niland, '59, to Raymond W. 

Booth, Jr., '58. on July 23, 1960. 

(Continued on next page) 

January-February, 1961 



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Lt. Barbara V. Stoner, '58, to Lt. Ro- 
bert J. Grady, on June 5, 1960. 

Nancy C. Messick to Christopher J. 
Ray, '55, on June 25, 1960. 

Births 

To Mr. and Mrs. John Holt Rice, a 
son, Andrew Damron, on March 17, 
1960. Mr. Rice was graduated in 1958 
and Mrs. Rice in 1956. 



COMPLETED 
CAREERS 




General Beukema 

General Herman Beukema 

Brigadier General Herman Beukema 
(U. S. Army, retired), Director of 
Maryland's European Division, died 
suddenly in Heidelberg November 26. 
He was the victim of a heart attack. 

The loss of the 69-year-old Director 
is mourned throughout the University, 
its overseas program, and by the armed 
forces. Literally thousands of officers 
studied under General Beukema during 
his 26-year career as a teacher and de- 
partment head at the U. S. Military 
Academy at West Point. 

General Beukema was named Direc- 
tor of the European Division in 1954. 
His appointment came shortly after his 
retirement from the Army. 

He was graduated from West Point 
near the top of the Class of 1915 — the 
same class of which President Eisen- 
hower was a member. General Beu- 
kema's service career included duty on 
the Mexican border and action in 
France in World War I. He joined the 
West Point staff in 1928 for what he 



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42 



the Maryland Magazine 



expected would be temporary duty. In 
the course of his subsequent 26-year 
term there, he taught an estimated 
15,000 cadets. 

He was the author of many books 
and articles, a number of which were 
adopted as West Point textbooks. 

His teaching career at the Academy 
was interrupted by World War II, dur- 
ing which he took command of the 
Army Specialized Training Program. 

His teaching specialties included eco- 
nomics, government, history, and inter- 
national relations. 

His military service decorations in- 
cluded the Distinguished Service Medal 
and the Purple Heart. In recognition 
of his renown as an educator, he was 
awarded the honorary doctorate of sci- 
ence by Washington and Jefferson Col- 
lege and honorary law degrees by Rut- 
gers and Norwich Universities. 

General Beukema was a member of 
the Board of Trustees of the West Point 
Association of Graduates from 1933 
to 1953. 

Among his family survivors are his 
widow, the former Margaret Shaw, who 
resided with him in Heidelberg. 

General Beukema was buried at West 
Point December 3. 



Herman F. McPherson 

Dr. Herman F. McPherson on Septem- 
ber 17, 1960. Mr. McPherson gradu- 
ated from the School of Medicine in 
'09 and entered practice in Queen 
Anne's County in 1910. 



Other Deaths 

Louis L. Burger, LL.B. '96, of Balti- 
more, Maryland. 

John P. Galvin, Jr., LL.B. '27, of Balti- 
more, Maryland. 

Paul H. Langdon, LL.B. '33, of Balti- 
more, Maryland. 

Louis Paul Bolgiano, LL.B. '13, of Bal- 
timore, Maryland. 

Fred Grayson Boyce, Jr., LL.B. '00, of 
Baltimore, Maryland. 

Henry W. Smith, LL.B. '09, of Tuscon, 
Arizona. 

Wesley Earle Thawley, LL.B. '18, of 
Denton, Maryland. 

Hon. Philip B. Perlman, LL.B. '12, of 
Washington, D. C. 

Ben Weintraub, L.L.B. '23, of Balti- 
more, Maryland. 

Daniel Ellison, LL.B. '09, of Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

Louis N. Frank, LL.B. '96, of Balti- 
more, Maryland. 

Daniel Clay Mills, LL.B. '30, of Beth- 
lehem, Pennsylvania. 

James M. Mullen, LL.B. '06, Ashville, 
North Carolina. 

Ellsworth R. Roulette, LL.B. '17, of 
Hagerstown, Maryland. 

January-February, 1961 



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43 



36 

42 

Engraving Company 24 

,.i .'1 

American Disinfectant Company 41 

American Telephone & Telegraph Company 

Inside Front Cover 

Anchor Post Products Co., Inc. 34 

Aristocrat Linen Supply Co., Inc. 42 

Arnold's Village Shop 26 

Arundel Federal Savings & Loan Assn. 28 

The Asphalt Service Co.. Inc. 24 

Baltimore Check Room Service 39 

Baltimore Envelope Company 31 

Baltimore Stage Curtain Co 38 

Hank of Crisfield 41 

Barber & Ross Hardware, lnc 25 

Bard-Avon School 31 

Bergmann's Laundry 37 

Bethesda Cinder Block Mfg. Co., lnc 40 

Blackie's House of Beef 26 

Hon Ton Saratoga Food Products 36 

Harry A. Boswell Co 40 

Hriggs Construction Co., lnc 25 

Hriggs & Company 36 



Thomas E. Carroll & Son 

I). Harry Chambers, Opticians 

Chaney's Garage 

Cloverland Farms Dairy 



32 
35 

37 
20 



Colin & Hock Co 41 

ColsonMcrriam Co 40 

Commercial Envelope Co 35 

A. Myron Cowell, lnc 23 

Victor Cushwa & Sons 40 



Davidson Transfer & Storage Co.. 

F. A. Davis & Sons 

D. ('. Ignition Headquarters, Inc. 



33 

38 

41) 

Del-Haven White House Motel . 40 

Dietrich & Gambrill, lnc 43 

Dietrich Hros., lnc 27 

Duckworth Roofing Co 32 

Electronic Wholesalers, lnc 37 

Embassy Dairy 23 

Farmi I I OOpi rative Association 43 

J. II. Filbert, lnc 22 

First Federal Savings &• Loan Assn. 30 

First .National Hank 21 

Leland L. Fisher ... 37 



Directory of Advertisers 



Foreign Motors, Ltd 39 

Fraternity Federal Savings & Loan Assn.. 38 

S. A. Freas & Co 32 

Frederick Construction Co. 43 

Frederick Underwriters, lnc 43 

Fuller & d' Albert, lnc 34 

Albert F. Goetze Packing Co 34 

Gray Concrete Pipe Co 40 

M. J. Grove Lime Co 43 

The Handy Line (Paul M. Adams) 35 

Hannes Formal Wear 25 

Harrington Hotel 30 

Harvey Dairy, lnc 30 

Helm's Concrete Pipe Co 32 

Hendler's Ice Cream Co 27 

Johnston. Lemon & Co 25 

Frank B. Jones, Optician 29 

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Kidwell & Kidwell, lnc 40 

King Bros., Inc., Printing 38 

E. H. Koester Bakery Co 22 

J. Langrall & Bros.. Inc. 41 

Maurice Leeser Co 24 

Lord Calvert Hotel 29 

Lustine-Nicholson Chevrolet 36 

G. B. Macke Corp 36 

Maria's Restaurant 24 

Maryland Hotel Supply Co 24 

Massey-Ferguson 31 

Metropolitan Tourist Co 31 

Miller & Long Co 34 

F. O. Mitchell & Bro., lnc 32 

Modern Machinist Co 23 

Modern Stationery Co 38 

Morgan & Millard, lnc 35 

Murray-Haumgartner Co 38 



McLeod & Romborg Stone Co., Inc. 



39 



National Bank of Cambridge 42 

National Equipment & Supply Co 41 

Norman Motor Co 41 

North Washington Press 23 

Northrop Aircraft, lnc Outside Back Cover 



Occidental Restaurant 
Oles Envelope Corp. 

Olney Inn 



28 
33 
28 



Olsen Equipment Co 33 

Ottenberg's Bakers, lnc 30 

Park Transfer Co 34 

R. B. Phelps Stone Co i2 

Jimmie Porter (T/A Kiernan's) 41 

Puritan Compressed Gas Corp 35 

Refrigeration Supply Co 25 

Rex Engraving Co., lnc 39 

Rose Exterminator Co 32 

Salisbury Milling Co 42 

Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 42 

Schofield Co., lnc 42 

Schluderberg-Kurdle Co 42 

Sealtest Foods 37 

Seidenspinner, Realtor 40 

The Shade Shop 26 

Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co 31 

Russell W. Smith, Insurance 40 

Smith's Book Store 34 

Smith Welding Co 30 

Southcomb, lnc 27 

Southern Plate Glass Co 39 

Spring Hill Sanitarium 41 

Strayer College 35 

Students Supply Store 26 

Suburban Trust Co 36 

Mano Swartz, Furs 26 

Sweetheart Bakers 41 

Thomas & Thompson Co 22 

Thompson Furniture Co 38 

Thomsson Steel Co 37 

Town Hall Tavern 29 

Vermont Federal Savings & Loan Assn 24 

Wallop & Son, Insurance 23 

Washington Coca Cola Bottling Works 29 

Washington Wholesale Drug Exchange, Inc. . 34 

Westinghouse Electric Corp 22 

Wilkins Coffee Co 29 

Perry O. Wilkinson, Insurance 41 

Williams Construction Co 33 

Carl J. Williams & Sons 41 

J. McKenny Willis 41 

World Wide Travel Service 34 

C. O. Wurzberger & Sons 35 

Wye Plantation 42 

Duke Zeibert's Restaurant 27 



44 



the Maryland Magazine 



Maryland Alumni European Tour 




JUNE 28 to JULY 27, 1961 



rlh/lvli 11 IS! The exciting news about 
which hundreds of Maryland Alumni have been 
waiting to hear! Our trans-Atlantic charter plane 
leaves Friendship International Airport on June 
28, to begin a month-long adventure in Old 
Europe. 

Among the hundreds of points of historic and 
scenic interest and activities will be: Stratford-on- 
Avon; Westminster Abbey; a cruise aboard a 
Rhine steamer; the "Student Prince" city of Heidel- 
berg; Titisee, a quaint little town in the Black 
Forest of Germany; an excursion on Lake Lucerne, 



and then, by the steepest cogwheel railway in the 
world, to Pilatus Kulm; a gondola ride in Venice; 
the fountains of Rome; swimming on the Italian 
and French Rivieras; the Casino at Monte Carlo 
and the Palace of Princess Grace; the unrivaled 
experience of summer in Paris. 

Traveling as a charter group offers extraordi- 
nary savings. Included in the low tour cost is all 
transportation to and from Europe, travel and 
sightseeing tours in Europe, most meals, all gra- 
tuities and transfers, standard/superior hotel ac- 
commodations with twin beds and bath. 



For additional information 

please complete and mail 

the coupon opposite. 

Please send me detailed information 
concerning itinerary and other pertinent 
facts for the Maryland Alumni Euro- 
pean Tour, 1961, to: 



Mr. Victor Holm, Field Secretary 
Alumni Office 
University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 



name 



street address 



city and state 



school 



year 



LONDON -THE HAGUE • COLOGNE • WIESBADEN • HEIDELBERG • LUCERNE 
COMO • MILAN • VENICE • FLORENCE • ROME • PISA • RAPALLO • GENOA • N ICE 
MONTE CARLO • PARIS and many interesting and colorful sidelights along the way . . . 




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3oU* cE 



Maryland Room 

University of Maryland Library 

College Park, Md. 



Alumni Publication of the University of Maryland 




magazine 




•— - 



Volume XXXII Number Three • May-June 196 



• Alumni Day at College Park 









\K 








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families enjoyed in their outing at College Park, see pages 8 through I I 



I'IKiKK.U Nl'll UN \l D\M (,(.l l< 



the 




magazine 

Volume XXXII 



Number 3 



MAY JUNE • 1961 



Alumni Publication of 

the University of Maryland 

BOARD OF REGENTS 

CHARLES P. McCORMICK, Chairman 

EDWARD F. HOLTER, Vice-Chairman 

B. HERBERT BROWN, Secretary 
HARRY H. NUTTLE, Treasurer 
LOUIS L. KAPLAN, Assistant Secretary 

C. EWING TUTTLE, Assistant Treasurer 
RICHARD W. CASE 

THOMAS W. PANGBORN 
THOMAS B. SYMONS 
WILLIAM C. WALSH 
MRS. JOHN L. WHITEHURST 



DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 
President of the University 



OFFI CE OF UNIVE RSITY R EL ATIONS 
ROBERT J. MCCARTNEY, Director 

ROBERT H. BREUNIG, Editor 

SHELBY DAVIS WEINGARTEN, Assistant Editor 

JOSEPH F. BLAIR, Sports Editor 

AL DANEGGER, Staff Photographer 



OFFICE O F FINANCE AND BUSINESS 
C. WILBUR CISSEL, Director 



OFFICE RS OF THE ALUMNI AS^' 
MRS. ELIZABETH ROHR SIN 17, President 

DR. WILLIAM H. TRIPLETT, '11, Vice-President 
DR. REGINALD V. TRUITT, '14, Vice-President 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, '38, Executive Secretary 
VICTOR HOLM, '57, Assistant Secretary 

OFFICE OF ALUM NI RELATIONS 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, Dirrr-. , 

ADV ERTISING DI RECTORS 
MRS. EDITH A. ROSS 
RICHARD F. ROSS 

6451 Blemheim Road 

Baltimore 12, Md. 

DR 7-7692 



In This Issue — 






FEATURES 






2 


The Alumni Diary 




3 


Alumni and Campus Notes 




8 


Alumni Day at College Park 




12 


Maryland Books and Authors 




13 


University Sports 




NEWS FROM THE SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 






14 


Agriculture 




15 


Arts and Sciences 




15 


Business and Public Administration 




16 


Dentistry 




17 


Education 




18 


Engineering 




21 


Medicine 




23 


Nursing 




24 


Pharmacy 




26 


School of Social Work 




27 


University College 




29 


Social Notes 




29 


Completed Careers 






Published Bi-Monthly at the University of Maryland, and entered at the Post Office 
College Park, Md. as second class mail matter under the Act of Congress of March 3, 
1879. — $3.00 per year — Fifty cents the copy — Member of American Alumni Council. 



The General Alumni Council 

■ol and college 
representatives: 

H. M. Carroll, '20 
Paul M. Galbreath, '39 
Howard L. Stier, '32 

ART 

Charles F. Ellinger, '37 

John L. Lampe, '50 

Dr. Reginald V. Truitt, '14 

NESS & PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

Thomas E. Bourne, Jr., '43 
Ralph W. Frey, Jr., '41 
Chester W. Tawney, '31 

DENTISTRY 

Dr. Samuel Bryant, '32 

Dr. Harry Levin, '26 

Dr. Edward D. Stone, '25 

EDUCATION 

Clara Dixon, '34 
Harry Hasslinger, '33 
Loren Lee Lindley, '48 

ENGINEERING 

Emmett Loane, '29 
Robert J. McLeod, '37 
John E. Waldo, '57 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Mrs. Erna R. Chapman, '34 
Mrs. Ruth T. Clarke, '42 
Mrs. Jane M. West, '40 

LAW 

Emory H. Niles, '17 
Layman J. Redden, '34 
G. Kenneth Reiblich, '29 

MEDICINE 

Dr. Thurston R. Adams, '34 
Dr. Daniel J. Pessagno, '20 
Dr. William H. Triplett, '11 

NURSING 

Mrs. E. Elizabeth R. Hipp, '29 
Mrs. Norma S. Long, '49 
Mrs. Elizabeth R. Singleton, '47 

PHARMACY 

Hyman Davidov, '20 
Samuel I. Raichlen, '25 
Frank J. Slama, '24 

• 
EX -OFFICIO MEMBERS: 
Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 

President of the University 
David L. Brigham, '38 

Secretary-Treasurer 
Victor Holm, '57, Ass't Secretary 
Harry A. Boswell, Jr., '42, Past President 
Frank Block, '24, Past President 
Joseph H. Deckman, '31, Past President 
J. Gilbert Prendergast, '33, Past President 
J. Homer Remsberg, '18, Past President 
Col. O. H. Saunders, '10, Past President 
Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, '12 

Past President 
T. T. Speer, '17, Past President 
C. V. Koons, '29, Past President 
Dr. Arthur I. Bell, '19, Past President 

• 
ALUMNI CLUB REPRESENTATIVES: 
Baltimore — Mrs. Ethel M. Troy, '17 
Carroll County — 

Dr. Lawrence L. Leggett, '30 
Cecil County— Dr. Fred S. Fink, '56 
Cumberland — Reford Aldridge, '25 
Eastern Shore — Otis Twilley, '21 
Frederick County — 

James F. Zimmerman, '37 
"M" Club — George Knepley, '38 
Montgomery County — 

Robert W. Beall, '31 
New England — George Kerlejza, '25 
New York — Harold McGay, '50 
North Eastern Shore — 

Robert W. Downes, Jr., '46 
Overseas— Col. Ralph I. Williams, '33, '41 
Pittsburgh — Dr. Joseph Finegold, '34 
Prince Georges County — 

Egbert F. Tingley, '27 
Richmond — Paul Mullinix, '36 
Schenectady — Mrs. Janice Mackey, '51 
Terrapin — James W. Stevens, '19 
U. S. Dept. of Agriculture — 

William H. Evans, *26 
Washington County — 
C. Scott Couchman, '51 



THE 




LUMNI DIARY 



WHAT DOES A UNIVERSITY PROVIDE? THIS QUESTION HAS BEEN IN SHARP FOCUS 
for the past two months along with several answers provided by willing 
thinkers. The first obvious answer is alumni. The second, an opportunity for 
youth to broaden the base with which they will face life. The third might be 
called employment for many of varied background and experience. The one 
outstanding answer which is often overlooked, however, is knowledge. 

Some years ago, I visited the confused basement hideout of one of Maryland's 
former Congressmen, a man for whom I was named and one whose formal educa- 
tion stopped at the fourth grade. He combined work in the coal mines with spare 
time study to achieve a background in law which carried him to the Congress 
and to a national reputation. At the time of my visit, he was 82 years of age 
and was cutting and fitting little blocks of wood to form various odd-shaped 
structures. Apparently, my concern as to his well being showed in my face and 
he quickly explained, "The textbooks in physics and higher mathematics assume 
you already know certain basic facts. I must determine these facts before I can 
understand the books with which I work. You see, when a man stops learning, 
he should be buried." 

Several weeks ago, I had the opportunity to visit the Mercury Project to view 
the space vehicle in which history was recently made and to understand how 
much lies ahead. I met an astronaut whose name and face are now known around 
the world. I learned of his faith in his country and its capacity. Many great 
minds were a factor in his achievement; behind each were findings long since 
dropped from the advanced textbooks and the laboratory test tubes. 

Within our own circle, I heard members of our faculty give predictions for 
the next twenty-five years. Knowledge developed on our campus and multiplied 
many times over by equally brilliant minds across the checkerboard of our country 
and the globe makes us realize that the next quarter century will show more 
development in science and knowledge than has been possible throughout the 
entire span of modern civilization. 

What of life on other planets, of galaxies beyond the one of which we are 
a part, of the control of disease and life itself? What of energy, communication, 
transportation and even survival? It becomes obvious that knowledge upon 
knowledge, nourished and controlled by the great roots of our institutions of 
higher learning, is the central key to the future. We have long known the vital 
need for such institutions but never before has there been such complete depend- 
ence upon their growth, their research and their accomplishment. As individuals 
endowed with the opportunity to attain the knowledge of our day, we now have 
the added responsibility of making certain that other minds add to the structure 
in which we had a hand in order that the ever continuing urge for a breakthrough 
into the unknown may be possible. Ours is the past but with equal certainty we 
say to those who have tasted knowledge, ours is the future also. 

As ever, 




i^vt__^ 



David L. Brigham 
Alumni Secretary 



the Maryland Magazine 




UNIVERSITY CALENDAR OF ACTIVITIES 



JUNE 
10 

19-24 
26 

27 



Commencement Exercises 
Rural Women's Short Course 
Summer Session Registration 
Summer Session Begins 
27-July 1 University Theatre, "The Boy 
Friend" 



ULY 




26-28 


University Theatre, "The 


5- 7 


University Theatre. "The In- 




Gazebo ' 




nocents" 


AUGUST 




9-15 


Band and Choral Workshop 


4 


Summer Session Ends 


12-14 


University Theatre, "Epitaph 


7-12 


4-H Club Week 




for George Dillon" 


31 


Football Press Day 


19-21 


University Theatre, "The 








Imaginary Invalid" 


SEPTEMBER 


22 


Workshop Band Concert 


1 


Football Practice Begins 




Introducing Members 
of the University of Maryland Alumni Council 



PICTURED above are members of the General Alumni Council, 
governing body of the University of Maryland Alumni Asso- 
ciation. Seated left to right are Victor Holm, Alumni Field 
Secretary; Mrs. Norma S. Long, Nursing. '49; President Wilson 
H. Elkins; Mrs. Elizabeth R. Singleton. President of the Alumni 
Council and representing Nursing. '47; Mrs. E. Elizabeth R. Hipp. 
Nursing, '29; Mrs. Ethel M. Troy, Nursing, '17. representing the 
Baltimore Alumni Club (President); Mrs. Erna R. Chapman, 
Home Economics, '34; Miss Clara Dixon. Education. '34. 
First row standing are John E. Waldo, Engineering, '57; Dr. 
Frank J. Slama, Pharmacy, '24; Dr. Harry Levin, Dentistry, '26; 
Frank Block, Pharmacy, '24, Past President, Alumni Council; 
Hyman Davidov, Pharmacy, '20; Paul M. Galbreath, Agriculture, 



'39: Emmett T. Loane. Engineering. '29; Ralph W. Frey. Jr., 
B.P.A., '41; Robert W. Beall, A&S, '31, representing Montgomery 
County Alumni Club; Harry E. Hasslinger. Education. '33; and 
H. M. Carroll, Agriculture. '20. Back row standing are Col O. H. 
Saunders. Engineering. '10. Past President Alumni ( ouncil; 
William H. Evans. Agriculture. '26. representing U. S. Department 
of Agriculture Alumni Club; Chester W. Tawne>. B.I' V '31; 
Joseph H. Deckman. Engineering. '31. Past President Mumni 
Council: Thomas F. Bourne. Jr.. B.P.A.. '43; David 1 Brigham. 
A&S, '38. Director of Alumni Relations and Executive iecretarj 
of the Alumni Association: Samuel A. Goldstein, Pharmacy, '30: 
Dr. Albin O. Kuhn. Agriculture. '38. Executive Vice President of 
the University. 



May-June, 1961 




THE university OF MARYLAND CHOIR participated March 31 in a Good Friday concert of 
Bach's "Passion According to St. Matthew" presented at Carnegie Hall, New York City. 
Joining the University Choir was the Schola Cantorum Choir. Conductor was Dr. Hugh 
Ross. Director of Schola Cantorum. Fague Springmann. Associate Professor of Music at 
the University, was one of the featured soloists. The orchestra was made up of members 
of the New York Philharmonic. 




a gift of $25,000 to support research on heart disease was presented to the University 
May 5 by the William F. and Caroline Hilgenberg Foundation. Principals in the presenta- 
tion at the University's Baltimore Union were, left to right, Dr. William S. Stone, Dean 
of the School of Medicine; President Wilson H. Elkins; Mrs. William F. Hilgenberg, Pres- 
ident of the Foundation; and Mr. Moses W. Rosenfeld, Vice President and Secretary of 
the Foundation. The award was made in memory of Mr. Hilgenberg, former State Banking 
Commissioner and civic leader. 



I'RISidini and mrs. WILSON H. elkins entertained more than 300 graduating seniors 
and members of the faculty at the Third Annual President's Reception held May 14 on 
the lawn of their home, the President's Reception, one of the last official University 
functions for the graduates, gives Dr. Elkins an opportunity to personally wish seniors 
good luck in their future endeavors. 




Armory Named For 
General Reckord 

In a setting combining the academic and 
military disciplines the University Arm- 
ory was officially named on February 1 7 
for Major General Milton A. Reckord. 
Governor J. Millard Tawes. members 
of the Board of Regents, President Elk- 
ins, the AFROTC color guard and Uni- 
versity's Concert Band were on hand to 
honor the General with appropriate 
ceremonies. 

In his welcoming address. President 
Elkins said that University AFROTC 
cadets would do well to reflect on the 
career of General Reckord. He stressed 
the value of AFROTC training, reflect- 
ing that citizenship is promoted through 
a better understanding of military ser- 
vice. 

Preceding the naming ceremonies, 
Colonel Theodore R. Aylesworth, Pro- 
fessor of Air Science, administered the 
Oath of Office to Cadets John L. Hull, 
Jr., James W. Shaw, Jr., William C. 
Speicher, James S. Lamdim, and Donald 
R. Kirtley, the last three as distinguished 
AFROTC graduates. Charles P. McCor- 
mick. Chairman of the Board of Re- 
gents, presented the insignias and Col. 
Aylesworth issued the certificates of 
commission. 

Colonel Aylesworth admonished the 
cadets to remember that "by you, your 
University will be known." 

In his tribute to General Reckord, 
Mr. McCormick stated that the Regents 
were unanimous in their decision to 
name the Armory for him. He said that 
General Reckord's career has been an 
"outstanding record of military states- 
manship." 

A plaque commemorating the nam- 
ing ceremony will be placed in the foyer. 

Colonel James P. Wharton, USA Ret., 
Professor and Head of the Department 
of Art, representing the faculty present- 
ed a tribute to Major General Reckord. 
Governor Tawes praised his Adjutant 
General for his sense of responsibility 
and dedication. 

Responding to the tributes. General 
Reckord said that one principle guiding 
his career has been "service to the 
nation." 

Members of the platform party were 
General Reckord, Governor Tawes, Mr. 
McCormick, President Elkins, Dr. 
Kuhn, Dr. R. Lee Hornbake, Vice Pres- 
ident for Academic Affairs, Mr. Edward 
F. Holter, Vice Chairman of the Board 
of Regents, Col. Aylesworth, Professor 
Wharton, the Reverend Stevens, and 
Rabbi Grecnberg. 



PG Alumni Club Presents 
Open Discussion Program 

An open discussion program by three 
University of Maryland faculty mem- 
bers on man and "The Next 25 Years" 
was presented by the Prince Georges 
County Alumni Club, April 7 in the 
Student Union Lounge at College Park. 
Participants were Dr. John Toll, 
Professor and Head of the Department 
of Physics, who discussed the subject 
from the physical science aspect; Dr. 
Reuben Steinmeyer, Professor of Gov- 
ernment and Politics, who discussed the 
international relations question; and Dr. 
Robert Rappleye, Associate Professor 
of Botany, who discussed agriculture 
and the population explosion. The Rev. 
Jesse W. Meyers, University Presby- 
terian Chaplain, moderated the discus- 
sion. 




it's now officiai : ftv vote of the debate coaches of the college and university tennis who 
participated in the University of Maryland's I960 Capitol Hill Debate Tournament, Presi- 
dent John F. Kennedy was declared winner of the Nixon-Kennedy Television Debates 
aired prior to the Presidential election last sear. During the finals of the Debate Tourna- 
ment, held in the U. S. Caucus Room, Representative Chet llolifield. Democrat of Cali- 
fornia, accepted the plaque on behalf of the I' resident. Making the presentation to the 
President are, left to right, Rep. Holifteld. Mariline Myers. University student anil member 
of the Calvert Debate Society, and Malthon Anapol, Tournament Director and Coach of 
the University Debate Team. 



Scholarship Need Grows 

Mr. H. Palmer Hopkins, the new Direc- 
tor of Student Aid at the University 
of Maryland, reports a growing demand 
for student aid on the campus, despite 
the substantial increase in scholarships 
available at the University. 

"Almost half of our students here 
at Maryland are helping to earn their 
college expenses," he said, "and we find 
that half of the high school graduates 
eligible for college still do not go on to 
complete their education. So long as 
this urgent need for financial help exists 
with literally thousands of promising 
young people, we cannot relax our 
efforts to increase student aid at the 
University." 

Mr. Hopkins pointed to the fine work 
done by the Greater University of Mary- 
land Fund in this field. This Fund alone 
has increased available student aid by 
more than $75,000 in the three years 
since its founding. 

"There is no way that we can have 
such a profound effect on our future 
and have the personal satisfaction of 
helping young people as we can through 
scholarships," continued Mr. Hopkins. 
"We are hopeful that the interest of 
alumni, service organizations and clubs 
will continue to grow as it has in the 
past three or four years." 

Mr. Hopkins was recently appointed 
to this new office of Director of Student 
Aid to coordinate the administration of 
all forms of loans, scholarships and 
workshops for students at the Univer- 
sity, in a move designed to add material 
strength to this essential activity. 




president elkins receives congratulations and a plaque from William J. Simon, right, 
Chairman of the National Committee for Motor Fleet Supervisor Training, citing the 
University as a "pioneering educational institution in the field of motor fleet supervisor 
training." Dr. J. Freeman Pyle, left, Dean of the College of Business and Public Adminis- 
tration, looks on. The University was the first of 15 colleges and universities to offer this 
type of specialized training program. 



the department of art sponsored an Art Honors Program on May 14 in the Student 
Union Building. More than 30 pieces of student and faculty work were displayed. A 
highlight of the ceremony was the unveiling of "Prometheus." a new mural [shown below] 
b\ Mr. Mitchell Jamieson. 



May-June, 1961 



5 




Puerto Rico Alumni Meet 

On the occasion of the visit to San Juan 
ol Dr. and Mrs. Albert E. Goldstein 
and Mr Ah in F. Cormeny. the Puerto 
Rico ( hapter of the University of 
Maryland Alumni Association convened 
to hear words of greeting from the Uni- 
versity and to honor a number of their 
alumni. 

Dr. Goldstein, for three years Chair- 
man of the Greater University of 
Maryland Fund, and Mr. Cormeny, 
Assistant to the President for Endow- 
ment and Development, tendered the 
best wishes of the University and the 
alumni for the continued growth of the 
Puerto Rico Chapter. 

Honored by their fellow alumni were: 
Dr. Ruben Garcia Palmieri, Professor 
and Head of the Department of Medi- 
cine at the University of Puerto Rico 
School of Medicine; Dr. Luis Francisco 
Rafucci, '43, Professor and Head of the 
Department of Surgery; Dr. Enrique 
Perez Santiago, President of the Puerto 
Rico Medical Association; Dr. Jose 
Manuel Torres, President Elect of the 
Puerto Rico Medical Association; Dr. 
Mario F. Ramirez-Acosta, President of 
the Puerto Rico Dental Association; Dr. 
A. Benavent, President of the Puerto 
Rico Chapter of the American Dental 
Association; Dr. Jose Pico, '33, Profes- 
sor of Otolaryngology; Dr. Luis Guz- 
man Lopez, Professor of Neurosurgery; 
and Dr. Guillermo Pico, '40, Professor 
of Ophthalmology. 



Mr. McCartney Elected to 
ACPRA Responsibilities 

Robert J. McCartney, Director of Uni- 
versity Relations, has been elected Di- 
rector of the Mason-Dixon District of 
the American College Public Relations 
Association and District Representative 
to the Association's national Board of 
Trustees for a three-year term. 

One of eleven districts making up 
the national association, the Mason- 
Dixon District is made up of member 
colleges and universities in the States 
ol Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, 
and North Carolina, and the District of 
Columbia. 

The association is a non-profit edu- 
cational organization. It seeks to aid and 
assist institutions of higher learning in 
their efforts to improve relations with 
the various groups and organizations to 
which they arc responsible. 




officers of the Puerto Rico alumni chapter, and their guests, attending the April 16 
meeting in San Juan. First row, left to right: Dr. Enrique Perez Santiago, President, Puerto 
Rico Medical Association; Dr. J. R. Rolenson, President, Maryland Alumni Puerto Rico 
Chapter; Mrs. Goldstein, Dr. Goldstein, Dr. Mario F. Ramirez, President, Puerto Rico 
Dental Association; Dr. Miguel Alonso, Secretary, Puerto Rico Chapter. Second row, left 
to right: Dr. Francisco Garcia, Treasurer, Puerto Rico Chapter; Dr. Oscar Costa Mandry, 
Toastmaster; Dr. Luis Francisco Rafucci, Professor of Surgery; Dr. Manuel Rodriguez 
Etna, Mr. A. Cormeny, Dr. Jose Manuel Torres, President Elect, Puerto Rico Medical 
Association; Dr. Alberto J. Walsh, President Elect, Puerto Rico Chapter; Dr. Jorge 
Muhoz. Secretary Elect, Puerto Rico Chapter. Other officers of the Chapter are: Dr. 
Walter J. Benavent, vice president; Dr. Nestor H. Mendez, treasurer; Oscar Nevares, 
Dr. Jose Zequeira, Dr. Manuel Espinosa, Dr. Jose R. Fuertes, Dr. Julio Rolenson. 



Soviet Womanpower 
Surveyed 

A comprehensive 15-month study of 
the use of women as a Soviet labor 
resource is being made by a group of 
University economists and demogra- 
phers. 

Dr. Norton T. Dodge, Assistant Pro- 
fessor in the Department of Economics, 
is Executive Director of the project. 
Principal investigator on the project is 
Michael Roof, Research Associate and 
Research Analyst in the Library of 
Congress. 

Financed by a grant of $19,320 from 
the National Science Foundation, the 
project will focus on the importance of 
women in Soviet science, engineering, 
and related fields. The evaluation of the 
utilization of women in these fields will 
be made, however, within the broader 
context of the participation of women in 
all branches of the labor-force. 

According to Roof, a recent Soviet 
population census, of January 15, 1959, 
revealed that there are 20 million more 
adult women than adult men (for the 



United States the comparable figure is 
about 3 million). 

"This fact has created fundamental 
social and economic problems, and, in 
particular, has made necessary an at- 
tempt in the USSR to maximize the 
utilization of women," he said. 

"The significance of women in Soviet 
professional life," he continued, "is il- 
lustrated by the fact that they constitute 
three-fourths of physicians, two-thirds 
of professionals in education, and well 
over half of the economists. Women 
also make up a high percentage of the 
industrial, construction and agricultural 
workers," Roof added. 

He explained that the study has been 
designed to explore the impact of the 
massive use of female labor on family 
life, child-bearing, and child-rearing. 
Other considerations in the study will 
include the Soviet manpower "pinch" 
of recent years, the extent the Soviet 
government has contributed to the labor 
supply problems by failing to provide 
needed shopping and child-care facilities, 
the location of new industries without 
reference to available female labor sur- 
pluses, and the similarities to, and 
differences from modern European and 
Asian experience. 



the Maryland Magazine 




dr. Dietrich c. smith, left, Professor of Physiology of the School of Medicine, is shown 
receiving a scroll from Dr. John C. Krantz. Head of Pharmacology of the School of 
Pharmacy, a! a dinner meeting of the Maryland Society for Medical Research. Dr. Smith 
was honored for his ten years' service as secretary of the Society. 



Enrollment up 12.7 Percent 

The Office of Admissions and Registra- 
tions has reported a 12.7 increase in 
enrollment at College Park over 1959. 
The present enrollment is 13,507 grad- 
uate and undergraduate students. 

Percentage increases occurred in all 
colleges: Arts and Sciences, 19.1; En- 
gineering, 2.7; Education, 12.8; Busi- 
ness and Public Administration, 9.6; 
Agriculture, 4.1; Physical Education, 
10.8; Home Economics, 9.0; Nursing, 
8.9; and University College, 21.7. Pre- 
pharmacy did not show an increase as 
the program was offered at College 
Park for the first time this year. 

The total enrollment of male stu- 
dents was up 9.2 percent, while women 
students increased 20.6 percent. The 
University now has enrolled 9,345 male 
and 4,162 female students. 

About 50 percent of the total enroll- 
ment is made up of students from 
Prince Georges and Montgomery Coun- 
ties. A total of 86.7 percent of the in- 
State enrollment is made of students 
from Baltimore City, and Baltimore, 
Anne Arundel, Frederick, Howard and 
Washington Counties. 

Approximately 17.4 percent of the 
total student body is from outside the 
State of Maryland. 



President is Chairman 
of Air University Board 

President Elkins will begin his final 
year on Air University's Board of Vis- 
itors this month as the Board's interim 
chairman. 

He was appointed to the three-year 
term in 1958 by the USAF Chief of 
Staff. 

The Board, composed of top educa- 
tors and business executives from 
throughout the nation, meets at least 
once annually at Maxwell Air Force 
Base, Alabama, to evaluate the man- 
agement, curriculum, methods of in- 
struction and facilities of Air Univer- 
sity — the professional aerospace educa- 
tion center of the Air Force. 

Board of Visitors membership is by 
personal invitation of USAF Chief of 
Staff Gen. Thomas D. White. The 
Board's annual report is made directly 
to him. 



Regent Named to Committee 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst, Maryland 
civic leader and nationally known club- 
woman, has been named Chairman, 



Women's ( ommittcc, u>i the rwentieth 
International Navigation < ongress, by 
( hairman I Millard I awes, < iovei noi 
ol Maryland Mis Whitehurst is a 
member oi the I niversity's Board i>t 
Regents. 

Mrs. Whitehurst will be responsible 
for the social and cultural program foi 
the women who accompany the more 
than i.ooo international delegates to 
the (ongress to be held in Baltimore 
September I I through 19, 1961. 

Sponsored by the United States De- 
partment of State and the Department 
ol the Army, this Twentieth (ongress 
is being held in the United States lor 
the first time since 1912 when Philadel- 
phia was the host city. Aimed at pro- 
moting the progress of inland and mar- 
itime navigation, the (Ongress is ex- 
pected to attract delegates from 52 
member nations. Governor Tawes is 
chairman of the Organizing Committee. 




pictured in the studio of the nationally 
televised Continental Classroom is Dr. 
John R. Mayor, left. Director of Educa- 
tion, American Association for the Ad- 
vancement of Science, and part-time Pro- 
fessor of Mathematics at the University. 
Dr. J it Hits H. Hlavaty, national teacher of 
the course "Teaching of Modern Algebra." 
is shown going over notes and data with 
Dr. Mayor. Featured as a guest lecturer 
on the January 24 lesson. Dr. Mayor par- 
ticipated on a symposium with two other 
eminent educators: Mr. Frank Lindsay, 
Chief, Bureau of Secondary Education. 
California State Department of Education, 
and Mr. Frank Hawthorne, Supervisor of 
Mathematics Education, New York State 
Education Department. 

Continental Classroom, presented by 
Learning Resources Institute, in coopera- 
tion with the Conference Hoard of the 
Mathematical Sciences and the National 
Broadcasting Company, is telecast five 
mornings each week by some IM stations 
throughout the country. Some 290 colleges 
and universities are offering the course for 
credit. 



May-June, 1961 



7 







. ** 




Alumni Day At College Park 



A DAMP, COLD AND GENERALLY UNPLEASANT DAY DID NOT 
discourage the many alumni returning to the College 
Park campus for another Alumni Day. On May 6, the weather 
worked against those who planned to enjoy Lacrosse, Base- 
ball and the Alumni-Varsity Football Game. 

Inside the Student Union, however, the sunshine of old 
friends reunited shut out the elements. As one alumnus ex- 
pressed it, "The fact that we stayed together in tight units 
gave us time to enjoy the day and each other." 

The traditional chicken barbecue luncheon was held inside 
rather than in the outdoor picnic style setting. School alumni 
business sessions and elections were combined with several 
class reunions as the order of the day. Special attention was di- 
rected to the class of 1911 which celebrated its 50th reunion. 

The largest return was that of the class of 1921 where the 
personal efforts of Billie Bland, Austin Diggs and others bore 
real fruit. Also present from the class of 1906 for their 55th 
reunion were J. J. T. Graham, L. Ferdinand Zerkel and J. M. 
Hunter. Other classes celebrating on the "five year plan" were 
those of 1916, 1926, 1931, 1936, 1941, 1946 and 1951. 



Dedication ceremonies for the new Wi million dollar BPA 
building were presided over by Dean J. Freeman Pyle. The 
occasion was the 40th anniversary of the founding of the 
College and featured Governor J. Millard Tawes; Mr. Albert 
P. Backhaus, Director of the State Department of Public Im- 
provements; President Wilson H. Elkins; Senator Mary L. 
Nock, Chairman of the Education Committee of the State 
Senate; and Delegate Perry O. Wilkinson, Speaker of the 
House. 

The principal address was by Dr. C. Canby Balderston, 
Vice Chairman, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve 
System. Referring to the structure he said, "It will help those 
who are eager to learn to satisfy their innate longing; it will 
help those dedicated teachers who, from their own liking for 
people and their own intellectual curiosity, devote their lives 
to prompting and guiding those who wish to learn." Speaking 
for the faculty was Dr. Reuben G. Steinmeyer; for the stu- 
dents, Mr. Albert Machesney; and for the alumni, Mr. Thomas 
E. Bourne, Jr., BPA Alumni President, who presented a por- 
trait of Dean Pyle on behalf of the alumni. 



MR. wingate and his party are met by Alumni Secretary Dave 
Brigham in the Student Union reception area. 



A COFFEE HOUR before dedication ceremonies for the Business and Public 
Administration and Classroom Building bring alumni and faculty together. 






.ft "A V »-, f *^T,. A m $Fl 



* 



*■*. «*v 









-jf^fe* * jri ^ «... 



above: Gov. Tawes addresses the dedication audience. 
rich i CENTER: Classmates of 1911 meet for their 
50th reunion, right BELOW: Members of the 25-year 
class. LEFT bklow: Mr. Wingate and Mr. Ty dings at 
dedication ceremonies. 




JO 



T 





JOSEPH D. TYDINGS, U. S. Attorney for 
Maryland, left, and Elmer Wingate natch 
the Army-Maryland Lacrosse match in a 
steady downpour. As the day became in- 
creasingly soggy, these alumni sought a 
solution to the weather problem. 




ALONG WITH A NUMH1R of other alumni, 
Mr. Tydings and Mr. Wingate and their 
wives moved into the two-story enclosed 
press box at Byrd Stadium and were able 
to watch the remainder of the sports con- 
tests in relative comfort. 




a coffee and cooKii: warm-up in the Stu- 
dent Union was provided by the Alumni 
Association following the day's sports- 
activities. 




alumni serve themselves at Student Union 
buffet and find an opportunity to catch up 
on old acquaintances. 



11 




Maryland Books and Authors 



Edited by Mrs. Harold Hayes, Head, Maryland and Rare Books Department 



Plischke, Elmer. CONDUCT OF 
AMERICAN DIPLOMACY. New 
York: D. Van Nostrand Co., 2nd 
Edition, 1961. xv, 660 pp. 



I 



N THE SECOND EDITION OF A WORK 

that first appeared in 1950, Dr. Plischke 
presents the most comprehensive, best 
organized, and most informative current 
work on this subject. It deals with the 
principles, procedures, and governmen- 
tal machinery involved in the conduct 
of United States foreign policy, as dis- 
tinct from a study of American diplo- 
matic history or substantive foreign 
policy. 

This edition reorganizes some of the 
previous material, updates facts, figures, 
and examples to cover developments 
during the last ten years, and adds a 
substantial amount of new material. 
Notable among the new additions is 
the chapter on "The New Diplomacy," 
which deals with a subject that first 
came to prominence in President Wil- 
son's proposal for "Open Diplomacy 
Openly Arrived At," and it expresses 
the idea that the public should have full 
knowledge and control of foreign policy. 

Dr. Plischke recognizes that the doc- 
trine of democratic diplomacy can be 
carried too far in its application to the 
procedures of diplomatic negotiation, 
as, indeed, President Wilson recognized 
in the negotiations at Paris in 1919. 
More recently, the "new diplomacy" has 
appeared in efforts to find easy solutions 
for diplomatic problems through the 
instrumentality of "summit conferences" 
between heads of government. We ap- 
pear to be entering a new era of summit 
diplomacy, but Dr. Plischke suggests 
that summit visits between two heads of 
government may be more productive 
than summit conferences among several 
heads of government who hold sharply 
divergent views on basic policy. 




by ELMER PLISCHKE 



Another new chapter on "The Exec- 
utive Organization for the Conduct of 
Foreign Relations" illustrates the com- 
plexity of the political mechanism 
through which our foreign policy is 
formulated and implemented today. The 
chapter can give only the highlights of 
the offices, agencies, and committees in 
our government that are involved in the 
foreign policy operations that now in- 
clude in their scope practically every 
interest of our national life. In this 
vast institutional network one finds in- 
creasing reference to "communica- 
tions," "cooperation," "coordination," 
and "collaboration" among the various 
agencies, thus emphasizing the impor- 
tant place of these functions in the 
making of policy. 

There are a good many other addi- 
tions to the text, including discussion 
of the organization of a United States 
diplomatic mission and of the task of 
the mission in coordinating American 
official activities abroad. The story is 
told of the amalgamation of the Civil 



Service personnel of the Department of 
State with that of the Foreign Service 
under the Wriston program from 1954 
to 1957, and Dr. Plischke reviews the 
various criticisms that have been made 
of the amalgamation program. He con- 
cludes that it has been beneficial on 
the whole, while concluding that the 
Foreign Service personnel system could 
be further improved. 

The author expresses several unfavor- 
able criticisms of Foreign Service offi- 
cers that will doubtless arouse consider- 
able controversy. He refers, for exam- 
ple, to a "general psychological stereo- 
typed uniformity permeating the For- 
eign Service," and says its members are 
so preoccupied with their prospects for 
promotion that they are subject to a 
"fear complex when confronted with 
the necessity of taking a stand on ques- 
tions even of moderate significance." 
Few Foreign Service officers would agree 
with the thesis that the Service is "fun- 
damentally not a policy-forming pro- 
fession," since the participation of its 
members in policy formulation has been 
considerably enhanced by the amalga- 
mation program. 

The valuable illustrative charts and 
tables of the previous edition have been 
updated and new ones have been added, 
and the previous appendixes and bibli- 
ography have been brought down to 
date. 

Though there are a few errors of fact, 
and some judgments open to question, 
the volume is nevertheless most useful, 
and should be read by anyone studying, 
or otherwise seriously interested in the 
structural basis and the operating pro- 
cedures on which our diplomacy rests. 

Reviewed by G. Bernard Noble, 
Director. Historical Office, 
Bureau of Public Affairs, De- 
partment of State. He is listed 
in Who's Who In America, 1960- 
61. 



12 



the Maryland Magazine 



UNIVERSITY SPORTS 



By JOE BLAIR Sports Editor 



Maryland's 1960-61 
Athletic Achievements 



M 



aryland's 1960-61 athletic 
program was the most successful for 
the Terps since 1955. The Maryland 
Varsity teams captured seven Atlantic 
Coast Conference titles and now have 
won 46 team titles in eight years of 
ACC competition. There have been 93 
titles won outright in the ACC and nine 
teams have shared the remaining four 
ACC titles. Of the 46 won by Maryland 
squads, 43 were outright titles and the 
Terps shared the remaining three. 

The 1960-61 teams won six titles and 
shared another with North Carolina and 
North Carolina State. The soccer, in- 
door and outdoor track, wrestling, la- 
crosse, and swimming teams successfully 
defended their titles although the swim- 
ming team was forced to share its 
crown. The rifle team won the first ACC 
team title awarded. 

The football team opened the season 
for the Terps with a 31-8 win over 
West Virginia University at Morgan- 
town and it was an indication of what 
was to come throughout the school year. 
The team in Tom Nugent's second year 
as Head Coach at Maryland went on to 
become the first winning team at Mary- 
land since the undefeated squad of 1955. 
Winning five of their final six games, the 
Terps compiled a 6-4 mark to go with 
their 5-5 in Nugent's first year. 

The Terps, with their ail-American 
End candidate Gary Collins leading the 
way, nearly rewrote the Maryland foot- 
ball records as they either deleted or 
added to 24 records. Quarterback Dale 
Betty erased several passing records that 
had withstood all assault since 1942. 

The Lacrosse team completed their 
season with a 12-7 upset of Johns Hop- 
kins in their final game of the season. 
This was the first win over Hopkins for 
the Terps since 1956. Their 6-2 season 
record elevated the Terrapins' Lacrosse 
record to 259-62-3 since the sport was 
established on a Varsity basis in 1924. 
Coach Jack Faber now has a 237-54-2 
mark since he took over as Terp mentor 



in 1928. During this period the Terps 
have won seven National Champion- 
ships. 

Only a whisper separated the Lacrosse 
team from being tied for the National 
Championship. They played only one 
poor game — against Army during 
Alumni Day. They lost one other col- 
lege game — to Navy. And they beat 
Hopkins, Princeton, Virginia, Duke, 
New Hampshire and Washington and 
Lee. Coach Faber says they played their 
best game against the Baltimore La- 
crosse Club, U. S. Open Champions, 
losing to them by a score of 14-15. 

Outstanding players of the season 
were Fritz Waidner, attack man; Buddy 
Beardmore, midfielder; and Gene Reck- 
ner, defenseman. 

The soccer squad, which was not 
considered the best Maryland soccer 
team in pre-season estimates, certainly 
proved to be the finest as far as national 
ranking was concerned. The Terps, 
under Coach Doyle Royal, compiled a 
9-2-1 record, which included a 4-0 
ACC mark and three games in the 
NCAA Championship Tournament. Cliff 
Krug led the Terps in scoring, setting 
new Maryland single season and career 
records. His 26 goals for the season and 
five in the Johns Hopkins game were 
also ACC records. 

The Terps lost in the finals of the 
NCAA tournament to St. Louis by a 
3-2 score after topping Rutgers 4-3 in 
a sudden death overtime, and Connecti- 
cut 4-0. The Terrapins now have a 14- 
year soccer record of 106 wins, 23 de- 
feats and 8 ties. Their ACC mark is 
30-0-1 for the eight years of the Con- 
ference, winning the ACC championship 
each year. 

The cross-country team under the 
tutelage of Coach Jim Kehoe won all 
six of their dual meets, including five 
in the Conference and a 22-33 win at 
Annapolis. The annual ACC meet was 
held on the University of Maryland 
Golf Course with the Terps finishing a 



close second lo North ( .irolm.i. .1 team 

the lerps topped 25- ^2 m a triangular 
meet. 

Coach "Sully" Krouse opened the 
winter sports program with the finest 

Wrestling squad he has had ill his 14 

years as the Maryland mentor. I he 

team compiled a <i-2 overall m.nk and 

a 4-0 Conference record, losing only to 
powerful Penn State and Pittsburgh in 

close meets. I he grapplers won their 
eighth Conference title and made a 
shambles of the Conference tournament 
at College Park, winning all ten indi- 
vidual titles, while setting a new scoring 
record of I 16 points. 

Coach Bill Campbell's swimming team 
opened the fifth year of varsity competi- 
tion for the Terps at North Carolina 
State and dropped a close meet to the 
Wolfpack. However the Terps, defend- 
ing champions with a predominantly 
sophomore squad, rebounded and topped 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill just after 
the Tar Heels had upset the Wolfpack. 
Thus Maryland, with a 6-1 Conference 
record and a 10-2 overall mark, shared 
the 1961 team title with North Carolina 
and North Carolina State, after winning 
the title outright in 1959-60. 

The Terp swimmers perhaps reached 
their peak with a last event loss to Navy 
just before the Middies snapped Yale's 
winning streak. The ..wimmers also won 
the second annual Metropolitan Wash- 
ington Collegiate Swimming Champion- 
ships with ease. Ray Ostrander, the 
swimming sensation from Torrington, 
Conn., won the ACC 50-yard freestyle 
championship and his time has been 
submitted for all-American recognition. 

Coach "Bud" Millikan's basketball 
team opened the season with a five- 
game winning streak, including wins 
over top intersectional opponents Penn 
State, Minnesota, Georgetown and 
George Washington and later added a 
win over Navy. With Bob McDonald, 
one of the nation's top foul shooters, 
leading the scoring, the Terps compiled 
a 14-12 overall record and a 6-8 ACC 
mark. 

Coach Jim Kehoe's indoor track team 
won its sixth consecutive ACC title in 
the annual indoor games at North Caro- 
lina. The Terps have now won seven of 
the eight indoor titles. The individual 
champions were Jonas Spiegel. Chris 
Stauffer, Mark Wells, Wayne Smith, 
Bill Johnson, Dick Estes, Jim Bland. 
John Belitza and the mile and 2-mile 
relay teams. 

The outdoor track team matched the 
indoor marks, including the six consec- 
utive titles record and seven of eight 



May-June, 1961 



13 



•id. It also won a dual meet over 
Navy. Pittsburgh, North Carolina and 
West Virginia were also dual meet vic- 
tims oi the outdoor team. Spiegel won a 
pair nt outdoor titles and Johnson. 
Belitza and Wells also repeated out- 
doors, as did the mile relay team. Nick 
Kovalakides and Dick Smith also added 
outdoor titles. 

Maryland's rifle team under the tute- 
lage of S Sgt. William Holland won the 
first annual ACC rifle tournament and 
their section of the NRA sectionals held 
at the University. Phillip Hansen won 
the Conference individual title with a 
289 score while Craig Hardy won the 
NRA sectional with a 290 mark. 

Coach Doyle Royal's tennis team 
completed the season with a fine 8-4 
record including a 5-2 mark in the 
tough ACC race. The number one 
singles player. Chuck Abelson, was un- 
able to attend the Conference tourna- 
ment due to studies, but Charles Shapiro 
was seeded eighth and reached the 
quarter-finals before losing. 

Shapiro teamed up with John 
O'Grady in the doubles and the pair 
reached the semi-finals before being 
ousted by the eventual champions. 
Coach Royal's teams have now won 134 
matches with 52 losses and 3 ties since 
he took over in 1946. Overall Maryland 
tennis teams in 31 years have a 215- 
1 17-4 record. 

Coach Frank Cronin's golf team fin- 
ished third in the Conference tourna- 
ment held at the University but Paul 
Quinn gained a tie with North Caro- 
lina's Pete Green making up two strokes 
on the final two holes for a two under 
par 142 total. 

The 10-2 mark for the season gives 
the golf team a 14-year record of 102 
wins against 55 defeats and two ties, all 
under the tutelage of Coach Cronin. 

The baseball team, hampered by the 
lack of pitching depth, performed about 
as expected, but still provided Terp 
fans with some thrills. Coach Jack 
Jackson, in his first year as Terp mentor, 
provided a major upset when the Terps 
started North Carolina on their down- 
fall, and the Terps were highly regard- 
ed in the South after dropping three 
close games to late inning rallies on 
Tobacco Row. 

The baseball team, although the only 
losing team of the 1960-61 season, with 
an 8-12 overall mark and a 5-8 ACC 
record, still produced several individual 
stars in top hitters Tom Brown, Frank 
Mart/ and Phil Rogers. Since 1920 the 
baseball team has compiled a 424-340- 
10 record. 



College of 
AGRICULTURE 

A. B. Hamilton 



1947 Alumnus Appointed 
Secretary of State 

Lloyd L. Simpkins, '47, was named 
Secretary of State by Governor Millard 
Tawes. Simpkins is a native of Somerset 
County. 

In 1950 he was elected to the House 
of Delegates and served as Chairman 
of the House Judiciary Committee from 
1954 to 1957. In 1959 Mr. Simpkins 
was appointed an administrative assist- 
ant in the Governor's office. 



Clark on Advisory Committee 

K. A. Clark, Easton, Maryland, and 
former staff member of the College of 
Agriculture, has been appointed to the 
National Research and Marketing Ad- 
visory Committee of the United States 
Department of Agriculture. 

A native Nebraskan with degrees 
from Nebraska and Iowa State Uni- 
versities, he was on the University of 
Maryland faculty for several years be- 
fore entering the meat packaging busi- 
ness as a buyer for Esskay Company in 
Baltimore. 

The Livestock and Marketing Advis- 
ory Committee membership represents 
the major livestock producing areas and 
works closely with the Department's 
Research Service in matters on produc- 
tion and distribution. 



Entomologists Serve the World 

Maryland graduates from the Depart- 
ment of Entomology now serve in many 
parts of the world. 

Russell G. Dent is Advisor in Ento- 
mology of the USDA for South Austra- 
lia. 

Arthur S. Kidwell is with the Inter- 
national Cooperation Administration at 
Port-au-Prince, Haiti. 

Ernesto J. Groskorth is with the Her- 
cules Powder Co. in El Salvador. 

Leopoldo T. Karganilla is Head of 
Entomology, Araneta University, Rizal, 
Philippines. 

John E. Scanlon spent two months in 
Pakistan studying flies that transmit 
leishmaniasis. Several cultures of phlem- 
botomers were brought back to Walter 
Reed Army Institute of Research. 

Jorge Quiros, '51, is plant manager 
for a large cooperative milk processing 
plant in San Jose, Costa Rica, Central 
America. 



Keller in Baseball Front Office 

Harold Keller, '53, was selected by the 
new Washington baseball administration 
to head their farm system of minor 
league clubs. Keller was a catcher with 
the Griffith owned Senators. It is good 
to see our graduates in spots where 
they can help mold the character and 
life of young men. 



Harris Ag. Engineer 

Dr. Gordon M. Cairns, Dean of Agri- 
culture, announces the appointment of 
Wesley Lamar Harris as Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Agricultural Engineering. Mr. 
Harris will devote part time to teaching 
farm power and machinery courses in 
the Department of Agricultural Engi- 
neering. Other duties for Mr. Harris will 
be in that part of the Department's re- 
search program directed at more effi- 
cient design, development and utiliza- 
tion of power and machinery in Mary- 
land agriculture. 

Mr. Harris, a native of northeast 
Georgia, graduated from the University 
of Georgia in 1953 with the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Agricultural En- 
gineering. As an honor graduate of the 
University of Georgia, Reserve Officer 
Training Corps, Mr. Harris was com- 
missioned in the U. S. Army and served 
three years in the Corps of Engineers. 



McNiel Joins Aircraft 

Robert W. McNiel, '50, is a Senior Tech- 
nical Writer with the Engineering Ser- 
vices Department of Aircraft Arma- 
ments. Mr. McNiel is responsible for 
the publication of a wide variety of 
handbooks and technical manuals. Re- 
cent assignments have included the 
preparation of material for a missile- 
training system and a maintenance an- 
alysis test set. 

Prior to joining Aircraft Armaments, 
Inc., he was employed by the Keystone 
Electric Company as a Control Engi- 
neer. 

Mr. McNiel is working toward a B.S. 
in Electrical Engineering in the evening 
division of the Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, and is currently living in Towson 
with his wife, Dorothy. 



Dr. Enck Promoted to 
Department Head 

Dr. Frank D. Enck, who received his 
Ph.D. in Physics from the University 
in 1956, has been promoted to Head of 
the Physics Department at Franklin and 
Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsyl- 



14 



the Maryland Magazine 



College of 

ARTS AND 
SCIENCES 



Staff of the College 



Alumnus Namod Editor 
at doubleday 

Pykc Johnson, Jr., '37, has been named 
Editor-in-Chief of the new paperbook 
department of Doubleday & Company. 
The department issues books in the high- 
er-priced quality field and its imprints 
include Anchor Books, Dolphin Books 
and the Science Study Series. With a 
program calling for the publication of 
300 books a year, both originals and 
reprints, Doubleday will become one of 
the largest paperback publishers in the 
world. 

Mr. Johnson, who was editor of The 
Old Line, has edited one book in col- 
laboration with his wife. Cartoon Treas- 
ury, which appeared in 1955. He is a 
contributor of articles to magazines in 
this country and in England and his 
most recent piece, which dealt with FM 
radios in automobiles, appeared in in the 
October issue of Harper's. 



Dr. Lejins Presents Paper 

Dr. Peter P. Lejins, Professor of Soci- 
ology, presented a paper "Measurement 
of Juvenile Delinquency" at the annual 
meeting of the American Statistical 
Association. 

Dr. Lejins attended the Conference 
as a member of the United States dele- 
gation, appointed by the State Depart- 
ment, to the Second United Nations 
Congress on the Prevention of Crime 
and Treatment of Offenders. 



Col. Crosthwait Retires 

Col. S. L. Crosthwait, '31, retired as 
Professor of Air Science at Auburn 
University on October 27. A ceremony 
featuring a jet flyover was held in his 
honor. 



Summer Language Institute 

The University of Maryland, under the 
terms of the National Defense Act, will 
conduct its first Summer Language In- 
stitute at College Park in cooperation 
with the U. S. Office of Education Lan- 
guage Development Program. The In- 
stitute, to run from June 26 to August 
11, is designed to improve the calibre 
of language teaching, with special em- 
phasis on language speaking. 

Dr. William B. Falls, Professor of 
French, will be Director, Dr. Henry 
Mendeloff, Assistant Professor of Edu- 



cation and Foreign Languages, Associate 
Director. 

luenty high school teachers ol 
French and nineteen ol Spanish will 
gather at the University to "live" then 
respective language. The curriculum is 
designed to teach the latest methods, 
improve language proficiency, and 
broaden ami deepen knowledge ol the 
customs and culture of France or 
the Spanish-speaking countries. "Parler 
francais" or "hablar espanol" will be the 
absolute rule on and oil' campus. The 
staff includes, besides the Directors <{\k\ 
visiting dignitaries. Dr. Jean V. Alter. 
Dr. Frank Goodwyn, Dr. Philip Rovner, 
Mr. Richard Allen, Mr. Donald E. Cor- 
bin, and Mr. Andrew Zinovieff who will 
teach elementary Russian. Language 
laboratory and workshop, and cultural 
activities will be part of the program, 
as well as recreational facilities. 



Sabbatical in Israei 

Dr. Meyer Greenberg, Rabbi. Hillel 
Director, and Instructor of Hebrew, is 
on sabbatical leave this semester to study 
at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. 



College of 

BUSINESS AND 

PUBLIC 

ADMINISTRATION 



Maryland Press Institute 

The annual Maryland Press Institute, 
co-sponsored by the University's De- 
partment of Journalism and Public Re- 
lations and MPA, this year featured an 
address by Donald M. Bernard, a panel 
discussion, and the presentation of 
plaques and certificates to winners of 
the annual Better Newspaper Contest. 

College Park students heard Bernard, 
Vice President of Public Affairs, Wash- 
ington Post and Times-Herald, say that 
a newspaper's first responsibility is to its 
community. The community interest is 
best served when the paper takes a firm 
stand on important issues after it de- 
fines the problems and weighs them, he 
said. 

Bernard spoke at the luncheon at 
which seniors in the journalism and 
public relations department were guests 
of MPA. 

The panel discussing readability and 
responsibility of newspapers included 
Philip Heisler. Managing Editor of the 
Baltimore Evening Sun and President of 
MPA; Oscar L. Morris, Editor, Salis- 



bury I lines. rhomaS I IIuuIil's. Il 

Sunday Editor, Baltimore Sep., /• 
and Sunday American; Norman Hai 
rington, Publisher, Easton Star-Demo- 
crat; ( ieorge Rash. City 1 ditoi //<■ 
town Mad. and I >i Earl Newsom \ 
sociate Professor ol Journalism. 




Donofrio Elected 

Harold C. Donofrio, Ph.D. '51. was 
elected a member of the Board of Direc- 
tors of the Baltimore Junior Associa- 
tion of Commerce at the January meet- 
ing of the Board. In his new post, Mr. 
Donofrio has been assigned as Director 
of the Education and Public Events 
Committee. 

Mr. Donofrio is an account executive 
at VanSant. Dugdale, & Company, an 
advertising agency. He is Director of 
the Maryland Chapter. Association of 
Industrial Advertisers, and is an instruc- 
tor of Principles of Advertising in even- 
ing classes at the Baltimore College of 
Commerce. 



'53 Graduate Appointed 
Editorial Manager 

James P. Coyne. '53. has been ap- 
pointed Manager, Editorial Services, 
REA Express (Railway Express Agen- 
cy). The company headquarters arc in 
New York. 

At Maryland. Mr. Coyne majored in 
Journalism and was member of Pi Delta 
Epsilon and Vice President. Omicron 
Delta Kappa. He is a recipient of the 
Student Government Association Service 
Award and served briefly as SGA 
Chairman in the second semester of his 
Senior year. 



May-June, 1961 



15 



School of 

DENTISTRY 



Kyrle W. Preis, D.D.S. 



Ai.umnus Wins Bremner Award 

Rolla R. Burk. Jr., '60, has won the 
M. D. K. Bremner Award of the Amer- 
ican Academy of the History of Den- 
tistry for his paper "Dentistry and Re- 
ligion." 

The award, which was offered for 
the first time last year, carries with it 
a plaque and $100 prize. Dr. Burk's 
paper was the unanimous choice of the 
judges for first place in the contest, 
which was open to seniors in all dental 
schools of the United States and Canada. 

Dr. Burk, who is now serving a U. S. 
Public Health Service internship, was 
invited to read his prize-winning paper 
at the U.S.P.H.S. meeting held in April 
at Lexington, Kentucky. 

A Dental School senior, Alan J. 
Martin, tied for second place in the 
Fifth Annual Writing Award Competi- 
tion sponsored by the American College 
of Dentists. His winning paper, "The 
Need for Continuing Education in Den- 
tistry," will be published in The Journal 
of the Maryland State Dental Associa- 
tion. 



Dr. Turlington Appointed 
to Mayo Clinic 

Dr. Eastwood Gibbs Turlington, D.D.S. 
'54, has been appointed to the staff of 
the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minneso- 
ta, as a consultant in dentistry and oral 
surgery. Dr. Turlington completed a 
residency at the Mayo Foundation, 
Rochester, Minnesota, a part of the 
Graduate School of the University of 
Minnesota, and was appointed an assist- 
ant to the staff in January, 1960. He will 
receive the degree of master of science 
in dentistry from the University of Min- 
nesota in June. 



New Jersey Alumni Meeting 

The 1960 Annual Meeting of New Jer- 
sey alumni was held at the Robert Treat 
Hotel, Newark, this Winter. 

The afternoon program commenced 
with an illustrated presentation by Er- 
nest B. Nuttall, '31, Professor of Crown 
and Bridge Prosthesis at the Baltimore 
College of Dental Surgery. His subject 
was "Abutment Preparations Using High 
Speed Instruments." Following a discus- 
sion period. Jose E. Medina, '48, Pro- 



fessor of Operative Dentistry, presented 
"Ten Years of Progress in Operative 
Dentistry." The guest lecturers were en- 
thusiastically received by the largest 
alumni audience recorded. 

The dinner meeting was called to 
order by President Alan A. Gale, '50. 

At dinner the following were intro- 
duced: Charles B. Roberts, '00, oldest 
alumni present, and Drs. J. Dooley and 
C. Salerno, '59, the newest; Al Rapuano, 
'57, newest father; Clarence Schwiek- 
hardt, Secretary of the New Jersey State 
Board of Dental Examiners; and Frank 
Sabitino, '34, a member of that Board. 

Alumni officers presented were Alan 
Gale, '50; Nick Giudetta, '38; Elwood 
Snyder, Jr., '57; Sam Byer, '27; and 
Bob Jernick, '50. 

Guests presented were Dean Myron 
Aisenberg, '22; Jose E. Medina; Ernest 
B. Nuttall; Gerard Devlin, '23; Saul 
Gale, '22. 

There was a moment of silence in 
memory of Drs. Almon P. Doty, '27, 
and Winfield Atno, '22, who passed 
away this past year. 

Dr. Aisenberg gave a report on the 
Albert Harrington Memorial Fund. In 
addition, he described the "new" dental 
school and issued an invitation to visit it. 

The following officers were elected: 
President Robert Jernick, '50; President- 
Elect Nicholas Giudetta, '38; Vice Pres- 
ident Samuel Abrams, '27; Secretary, 
Elwood S. Snyder, Jr., '57; Treasurer, 
Samuel Byers, '27; Trustees for Fried- 
berg Memorial Fund, James Mahon, '51, 
and Richard Cabana, '57. 

In memory of Winfield Atno, '22, the 
New Jersey Alumni Association donated 
$200 to the Physiology Department to 
be used for library facilities. 

The highlight of the evening was the 
presentation of the Distinguished Alum- 
ni Award to Saul M. Gale, '22. After 
an introduction and biographical report 
by Gerard Devlin, the plaque was pre- 
sented by the recipient's son, Alan Gale, 
'50, the retiring President. 

The meeting closed with an introduc- 
tion of the new officers and a few words 
from Robert Jernick, the new President. 



Postgraduate Program 

A postgraduate course on "Restoration 
of Multiple Preparations" was given at 
the Dental School on December 17. 
Those participating in the program were 
the following: Doctors Jose E. Medina, 
Ernest B. Nuttall, Sterrett P. Beaven, 
Henry J. Bianco, Jr., Calvin J. Gaver, 
Hugh M. Clement, Edmond G. Vanden 
Bosche, Francis A. Veltre, Jose H. Diaz, 
Yam-hin Louie, and Dr. Theodore J. 
Noffsinger. Jose E. Medina served as 
moderator. 

Alumni in attendance were: Doctors 
Nicholas J. Capone, Joseph McKechnie, 
Jr., Paul Rivas, Jerome Schwartz, 



William E. Wolfel, Jr.. Joseph Shevenell. 
Leonard B. Isbister, R. E. Jacoby, James 
E. Tether, Irving Schein, Thomas E. 
Wolf, Byron C. Woodside. 



Dr. Markowitz Elected Fellow 

During the 101st meeting of the Amer- 
ican Dental Association held in Los 
Angeles, Aaron B. Markowitz, '35, was 
inducted as a Fellow in the American 
College of Dentists. He is the originator 
of a course of instruction in the "Essen- 
tials of Dental Health Education for 
Student Nurses," and was the editor of 
a textbook on the subject. 

The course is now being taught in 
a number of hospitals in the United 
States and abroad. 



Durocher at Pennsylvania 

Roy T. Durocher, '50, has been pro- 
moted to Assistant Professor of Oral 
Medicine at the University of Pennsyl- 
vania. 

Dr. Anderson Appointed to 
Advisory Post 

Dr. George M. Anderson of Baltimore, 
Maryland, has been appointed to the 
National Advisory Committee on 
Chronic Disease and the Health of the 
Aged, U. S. Public Health Service. Dr. 
Anderson is a former professor of ortho- 
dontics at the School of Dentistry, his 
alma mater, which conferred on him in 
1956 the Doctor of Science degree and 
its First Distinguished Alumni Award. 
Dr. Anderson has been a member of 
the Maryland State Board of Health 
since 1935, is currently President of 
the American Association of Orthodon- 
tists and is a Past President of the 
Middle Atlantic Society of Orthodon- 
tists. Dr. Anderson is also a Trustee of 
the American Academy of Sciences and 
a widely known author. 

Dr. White Named Fellow 

Dr. John I. White, Professor of Physi- 
ology and Head of the Department in 
the School of Dentistry, has been named 
a fellow of the New York Academy of 
Sciences. 

This honor is awarded to academy 
members who have attained outstand- 
ing recognition for scientific achieve- 
ments. 



Dr. Cappuccio Lectures 

Dr. Joseph P. Cappuccio, Associate 
Professor of Oral Surgery at the School 
of Dentistry, lectured on oral surgery 
in San Juan and at the University of 
Puerto Rico this past January. 



16 



the Maryland Magazine 



College of 

EDUCATION 



Mary J. A hall 



School Teacher Wins European 
Tour 

Rita Giovannetti Cameron, Educ. '57, 
was recently cited as one of the school 
instructors making the best use of edu- 
cational television. Mrs. Cameron, who 
was a winner on the national level, was 
awarded a six-week tour of Europe. 

Mrs. Cameron, a teacher in the ele- 
mentary school system of the District 
of Columbia, was selected from among 
1,640 Nation-wide finalists on the basis 
of her "ability to give her students a 
better understanding of the world they 
live in, belief in the value of educational 
travel, and imaginative use of 'expedi- 
tion' as a teaching resource." 

Expedition is an ABC-TV educational 
television series viewed in over 200,000 
classrooms and seen by an estimated 
nine million students. 

The teacher travel awards were made 
possible by the Ralston Purina Company 
in a grant to the National Education 
Association's Division of Travel Service. 

According to Mrs. Cameron, "I won 
the contest by answering 100 questions 
on general knowledge and six essay 
questions on traveling and how I use 
the Expedition program with my teach- 
ing." 



Campus a< i rvi i n s 

Annemarie Chretien, Graduate Assist- 
ant in the College of Education, was 
cited by the Washington Post lor her 

work clone under a Cooperative Re- 
search Project on retarded children in 
Arlington, which project is being 
financed by a grant from the United 
States Othce of Education. I his project 
is under the direction of Dr. Jean R. 
Hebeler, Coordinator of Special Educa- 
tion, with Dr. Richard Wiggin serving 
as local Director and Esther B. Mills 
as Research Coordinator. This project 
is also presented in Children Limited, a 
publication of the National Association 
for Retarded Children. Mrs. Mills has 
served as a teacher of retarded children 
for several years in Arlington. 



Virginia's Superintendent of 
Public Instruction 

Dr. Woodrow Wilson Wilkerson, '52. 
was appointed Virginia's number one 
public school administrator on last Aug- 
ust 15 when he became Superintendent 
of Public Instruction. 

Dr. Wilkerson began teaching in Vir- 
ginia's public schools in 1934 at the 
age of 21. 

Contributions to Publications 

Dr. Jean D. Grambs, Lecturer in Edu- 
cation, prepared a five-page presenta- 
tion "Directions in Elementary Educa- 
tion" for the January 1961 issue of the 
NEA Elementary Instructional Service. 
Dr. James L. Hymes, Director of 
Childhood Education, has an article, 
"The Wonderful Years from Five 



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May-June, 1961 



17 



["hrough Eight,'' appearing in the NEA 
Journal November, 1961. 

Dr. M. C lemens Johnson. Associate 
Professor of Education, presented a 
paper" for distribution at the meeting 
ol the American Education Research 

Association in Chicago in February en- 
titled. "Some Effects of Cluster Samp- 
ling." 



Participants in Meetings 

The Faculty of the College of Educa- 
tion were prominent participants in the 
various programs for the meeting of 
the American Association of School 
Administrators. 

Dr. Kenneth O. Hovet, Professor of 
Education, participated as a panel mem- 
ber on topic "A Penetrating Look at 
the Junior High School." He also con- 
ducted a demonstration interview "What 
Can the Superintendent Really Expect 
from the Principal?" 

Dr. Clarence A. Newell, Professor of 
Educational Administration, was a 
leader of a discussion group "Internships 
for Administrators." 

Dr. M. Clemens Johnson, Associate 
Professor of Education, spoke on "Im- 
proving the Competence of Teachers in 
Measurement and Evaluation." 

Dr. Vernon E. Anderson, Dean of 
the College of Education, chaired a 
group on "Who Is Making Curriculum 
Decisions?" 

Dr. James A. van Zwoll, Professor 
of Education, spoke on "Community 



Understanding as a Factor in Financial 
Support of Public Education." 

Dr. Orval L. Ulry, Professor of Edu- 
cation and Director of Summer School, 
gave the principal address "Education 
1960's" at the Spring Conference of the 
Eastern Shore Professional Group at 
Salisbury, Maryland. 

Dr. Ulry also talked to the Forest 
Heights Elementary School PTA in 
February on "Science in the Elemen- 
tary School," and served as a member 
of the judging group for the Science 
Fair Program at Parkville Senior High 
School in Baltimore County. 

Dr. Vernon E. Anderson gave the 
principal address at the Professional 
Teachers' Meeting in Southern High 
School at Oakland, Maryland. The topic 
was "Current Issues in the Curriculum." 

Dr. John Lembach, Associate Profes- 
sor of Art, and a member of the Co- 
operating Staff of the College of Edu- 
cation, was the principal speaker at the 
annual festival of the arts at San Marcos 
State Teachers College in Texas. He 
also spoke to a group of teachers in 
Arlington on "Three Dimensional Con- 
struction." 

Dr. Lembach has been asked to serve 
for a third term as Secretary-Treasurer 
of the National Art Association. He has 
also been asked by Victor D'Amico, 
Head of the Department of Art Educa- 
tion of the Museum of Modern Art of 
New York City, to chair a section on 
the "Philosophy of Art Education" at 
Ohio University. 



College of 

ENGINEERING 

Presley A. Wedding 

Faculty Notes 

Former Dean of Engineering S. S. 
Steinberg has returned to this country 
after serving as President of the Insti- 
tute Tecnologico Aeronautica, located 
at Sao Jose dos Campos in the State of 
Sao Paulo, Brazil. 

President Steinberg was recently dec- 
orated by the President of Brazil with 
the Order of Merit (Aeronautics), in 
the rank of Commander, the highest 
civilian award of Brazil "in recognition 
of outstanding services to the Govern- 
ment of Brazil." This latest award is in 
addition to numerous honors conferred 
upon him several years ago by South 
American countries for his work among 
them in the field of engineering educa- 
tion. 

Wins Science Academy Award 

Dr. Ronald E. Bowles. Ph.D., M.E. '57, 
has received one of the Washington 
Academy of Science's outstanding 
achievement awards for 1960. In his 
search for new methods of automatic 



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18 



the Maryland Magazine 



control, Dr. Bowles developed pneu- 
matic control devices that function with- 
out moving parts. It was for this achieve- 
ment the award was made. Dr. Bowles 
is Branch Chief at the Diamond Ord- 
nance Fuse Laboratories in Washing- 
ton, D. C. 



Ai umnus Makes Wori d Trip 

Paul Arthur. B.S., M.S.. M.E. - 48. and 
his family returned last Fall from a trip 
that took them around the world. Coun- 
tries they visited included Holland, Bel- 
gium, Switzerland, Austria, Egypt, 
Turkey, Iran, Palestine, India, Thailand, 
and Japan. A number of lecture engage- 
ments kept him busy at such places as 
the Eidgenossische Technishe Hoch- 
schule in Zurich, the Aeronautical En- 
gineering Department of Cairo, Egypt, 
the American University of Cairo, and 
the Abadan Technical Institute in Aba- 
dan, Iran. One contact in some ways 
more interesting than others was with 
Omer Yoldas, a University of Maryland 
classmate and now plant engineer at 
Robert College in Istanbul. 

Paul is with the Systems Corporation 
of America and has resumed the course 
in Space Travel he started at the Uni- 
versity of Southern California in 1958. 



Chi Epsilon Fraternity Grants 
Maryland Charter 

Chi Epsilon Fraternity, national civil 
engineering honorary, granted by unan- 
imous consent of all the chapters the 
petition of the University of Maryland 
for establishment of a chapter on this 
campus. 

A group of outstanding civil engi- 
neering students of the Class of '57 had 
previously formed a local honor society, 
the Civil Engineering Honor Society. 
The University's Student Life and Ac- 
tivities Committee gave the organiza- 
tion permission after one year's opera- 
tion to petition Chi Epsilon for a 
charter. 



Scott with Martin Co. 

D. H. Scott, "50, is with The Martin 
Company, Baltimore, Maryland, as 
Manager of the Weapons Systems En- 
gineering Technical Support Depart- 
ment. The Department consists of four 
sections: Scientific Computations (IBM 
709 computer plus analog computers), 
Scientific Presentations (editors, artists, 
illustrators, film directors, etc.). Mate- 
rials Engineering (selection of materi- 
als, coatings, finishes and standard pro- 
cesses for weapons systems) and Design 
Services (design checking, three dimen- 
sional layout and an engineering model 
shop). 



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Court of Appeals Appointments 

The Honorable Charles C. Marbury, 
'24, has been appointed to the Court of 
Appeals of Maryland by Governor 
Millard Tawes. Judge Marbury was 
formerly a judge in the Second Judicial 
Circuit Court. 

C. Ferdinand Sybert, '25, was also 
appointed by the Governor to the Court 
of Appeals of Maryland. Sybert was 
President of the Law Alumni Associa- 
tion in '52-53. Prior to his appointment, 
he was Attorney General of Maryland. 
He is also a former member of the 
Maryland Senate. 

Moot Count Winners 

John Holzer and J. Harlan Livezy were 
winners in the Moot Court held by the 
freshman class of the School of Law 
this past Winter. 

The competition was judged by Roger 
Howell, Dean of the Law School, act- 
ing as chief judge, and Joseph D. Tyd- 
ings and Charles E. Moylan, Baltimore 
attorneys. 

The case involved the liability of the 
State for negligence of police officers 
under a waiver of governmental immu- 



nity statute. It paralleled the case in- 
volving the man who informed on New 
York gangster Willie Sutton and was 
later mysteriously killed; in this instance 
the man's estate brought action against 
the City of New York for failure to 
provide adequate police protection. 

Law Day 

The second annual Pre-Law Program 
for undergraduate students was cele- 
brated at the School of Law on April 
28. 

The program was planned to give 
prospective law students a realistic 
insight into both the opportunities of- 
fered by a career in law and the de- 
mands that are made upon a law student. 

A review of student activities, the 
curriculum, methods of instruction, and 
expenses of a law education was pre- 
sented by members of a panel including 
members of the law school faculty and 
student leaders. 



McEvoy Completes Course 

Stuart V. McEvoy, LL.B. '53 and B.P.A. 
'50, who is District Accounting Man- 
ager of the Chesapeake and Potomac 
Telephone Company of Maryland, was 
one of 79 men to receive his certificate 
of graduation at the ceremonies con- 
cluding the new 16-week Program for 
Management Development at Harvard 
Business School. Mr. McEvoy lives in 
Ellicott City, Maryland. 



When you want RUSH to mean 



ship your package express by iff/UL^wAYS 




Same day delivery to most Maryland points due to frequent service. Send prepaid or 
collect. Large shippers prepare their own manifests — saving even more time. Economical 
rates. You owe it to your out-of-town customers to ask about this growing, Growing, 
GROWING service. Call your nearest Trailways agency. 

if 20 or more go . . . get TRAILWAYS CHARTER SERVICE 

Go anywhere, leave any time. The crowd stays together. Charter a new Trailways coach for more fun, added safety. 

TRAILWAYS 



BALTIMORE 

Howard and Lombard Sts. 
Phone PL 2-2115 



WASHINGTON 

12th and New York Ave. 
Phone Dl 7-4200 



OR CALL YOUR NEAREST 
TRAILWAYS TERMINAL 



20 



the Maryland Magazine 



School of 

MEDICINE 



Dr. John Wagner 



Endowment Fund Receives Bequest 

Dr. Isaac C. Dickson, '97, left the bulk 
of his estate of more than $491,000 to 
the Trustees of the Endowment Fund 
for purposes of creating an endowment 
to provide medical education for deserv- 
ing youths who could not afford it. 

The bulk of his estate was left in 
trust for Mrs. Dickson, and the will pro- 
vided that after her death a legacy of 
some $5,000 should go to the South 
Baltimore General Hospital, the remain- 
der of the estate going to the endowment 
fund to form the scholarship endowment 
to be known as the Isaac Cockey Dick- 
son Memorial Fund. 

Dr. Herbst Becomes Professor 

Dr. Edward J. Herbst was advanced 
to the rank of Professor of Biological 
Chemistry on December 1, 1960. He is 
presently serving as Acting Head of the 
Department of Biological Chemistry. 

Elected Fellow 

John J. Bunting, '38, was recently elect- 
ed a Direct Fellow of the American 
College of Chest Physicians. Dr. Bunt- 
ing has offices in Houston, Texas, also 
serves as Lecturer in Medicine at the 
University of Texas Postgraduate School 
of Medicine in Houston. Dr. Bunting's 
clinical interests include active clinical 
Associate Professorship of Medicine at 
Baylor College of Medicine. He is also 
the founder and senior internist of the 
Montrose Diagnostic Center in Houston. 

Dr. Vaughn Publishes 

Phyllis Peterson Vaughn, '48, who 
practices with her husband, Jim, '46, at 
Coral Gables, Fla., is serving as Instruc- 
tor at the University of Miami, Depart- 
ment of Medicine. Dr. Vaughn has 
published a number of papers chiefly 
related to the studies on arthritis. Re- 
cent publications include "The Com- 
parative Effects of Phenylbutazone and 
G 27202 (Metabolite I) in Patients 
with Rheumatoid Arthritis: An Assess- 
ment of Methods." The paper appeared 
in Arthritis & Rheumatism (April. 
1959) in collaboration with Drs. D. S. 
Howell and Iris Kiem. 

Another recent publication is entitled 
"Improved Diagnostic Method for Rheu- 
matoid Agglutinating Factor," a paper 
delivered at the interim session of the 
American Rheumatism Association held 
at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Min- 
nesota, in the latter part of 1958. 
{Continued on next page) 



Garden, Farm and Flower Seeds 
Fertilizer and Garden Supplies 

Power and Hand Mowers 
Plants and Bulbs — Insecticides 



F. W. Bolgiano & Company 



1220 H Street, N.W. 
NAtional 8-0091 

411 New York Ave., N.E. 
Lincoln 7-4800 




HIGH DIVIDENDS plus 
INSURED SAFETY 

Vermont 
Federal 
Savings 

AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 
Fayette at Hanover Streets 

Ball/more 3, Maryland 

All accounts insured up to $10,000.00 
by an agency of /he United Slates Gov't 



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ASSOCIATION OF WASHINGTON 

610 — 13th Street, N.W. 

Bethesda Branch 
8216 Wisconsin Avenue 



McLeod & Romborg 

Stone Co., Inc. 

— •— 

CUT STONE 

— •— 
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May-June, 1961 



21 



Sea CUatm 
Afxaltmettti 

FENWICK ISLAND'S NEWEST 

— Just Completed — 

On The OCEAN 
10 LUXURY APARTMENTS 10 



1 -Bedroom and Efficiencies 
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• Wall to wall carpeting 

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Telephone 

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Now Renting — Week, Month or Season 

Directly East of the Light House 

on Fenwick Island, Del. 



MARIO'S 

Specializing In 

ITALIAN AMERICAN FOOD 

Cocktail Lounge 

Continuance 

C^nteitalnment 

Beach Highway at 22nd St. 
OCEAN CITY, MD. 



Anchor Fence 

Anchor Post Products, Inc. 

1317 Half St., S.E. 

Lincoln 3-8151 

Virginia residents JEfferson 4-1110 

Northwest and suburban . LOckwood 5-3556 

Baltimore MEdford 3-6500 

Towson VAIley 5-7133 

Glen Burnie SOuthfield 1-0550 

Annapolis COIonial 8-3451 

OFFICES: 

THE DISTRICT, VIRGINIA, 

MARYLAND 



rflmrmj ( you s 



CARRYOUT SHOPS at 
Cold Spring lane & Loch 

Raven CH 3-5253 

Mon-Daw-Min Shopping 

Center LA 3-7766 





Charles St. below 25th 

BE 5 8744 BALTIMORE, MD. 



Grant to Dr. Spicer 

Dr. William S. Spicer. Jr., Associate 
Professor of Medicine and Head of the 
Section on Pulmonary Diseases, has 
received a grant-in-aid of $163,450 from 
the National Institutes of Health for the 
purpose of studying the effects of air 
pollution and weather variation on 
chronic pulmonary disease. 



Dr. Good Honored 

Dr. Thomas A. Good, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Pediatrics, has been honored 
by the Western Society for Pediatric 
Research as the 1960 winner of the 
Ross Laboratories Pediatric Research 
Award. 



Attends Cholera Conference 

Dr. Theodore E. Woodward, Professor 
of Medicine at the School of Medicine, 
recently returned from Pakistan where 
he attended an international congress on 
cholera. Dr. Woodward is a member 
of the cholera research advisory com- 
mittee of the National Institutes of 
Health, a group which has worked close- 
ly with the Southeast Asia Treaty Organ- 
ization in promoting cholera research 
in the Far East. 



Grant for Heart 
Surgery Renewed 

Dr. William G. Esmond, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Surgery, has been awarded a 
continuation grant of $15,000 from the 
National Institutes of Health toward 
the support of open heart surgery at the 
University Hospital. The grant, which 
has been made annually for the past five 
years, has aided the medical school's 
Department of Surgery in the develop- 
ment of improved types of heart-lung 
machines, medical heat exchanges, and 
other apparatus to meet the needs of 
advancing techniques in open heart sur- 
gery. The equipment developed by Dr. 
Esmond is being currently used in med- 
ical centers throughout the United 
States and abroad. 



Deputy Medical Director 

Robert B. J. Mulvaney, '58, was re- 
cently appointed Chairman of the Med- 
ical Social Welfare Committee of the 
Essex County Medical Society in New- 
ark, New Jersey. 

Dr. Mulvaney is serving as a resident 
in Pathology at the Martland Medical 
Center and is also the Deputy Medical 
Director of the City of Newark for 
Civil Defense. 



Salty Sands Motel 

46th St. & Ocean Front 
OCEAN CITY, MD. 



Every room and efficiency apart- 
ment with ocean view; private 
guarded beach; surf fishing. Maid 
service excluding kitchen. 

TV RENTED 

Mr. and Mrs. 

Edward G. Rost, Jr. 

Owners 

AT 9-9309 



oL an k f-o rd 
^rro tel 

OCEAN CITY. MD. 

BETWEEN 8th and 9th 
On Boardwalk 

AT. 9-7970 



Mgr. Mary B. Quillen 



Bacon for 
breakfast 





Albert F. Goetze, Inc 
CHOICER MEATS 

Baltimore, Md. 



ALCAZAR 

CATHEDRAL and MADISON STS. 

Phone VErnon 7-8400 

Baltimore, Md. 



22 



the Maryland Magazine 



Dr. Knabl Moves 

George W. Knabe, '49, formerly on the 
faculty of the University of Puerto Rico 
School of Medicine, has moved to Ver- 
million, S. D., where he has taken up 
duties with the School of Medicine 
there. 

Dr. Scher Publishes 

Jordan M. Scher, '49, has published a 
monograph entitled "Chronic Schizo- 
phrenia" in collaboration with Dr. Law- 
rence Appleby and Dr. John dimming. 
The volume, published by the Free 
Press of Glencoe, 111., appeared early in 
1960. Dr. Scher is secretary of the 
American Ontoanalytic Association in 
Chicago, Illinois. 



School of 

NURSING 



On Staff of Visiting 
Nurse Service 

Miss Georgia L. Helmick, Nurs. '55, 
M.S. '58. daughter of Rev. and Mrs. 
C. M. Helmick, formerly of Cumber- 
land, now residing in Elkhart, Indiana, 
has received an appointment to the staff 
of the Visiting Nurse Service of New 
York. 

Visiting Nurse Service of New York 
is the largest voluntary public health 
nursing service in any city. It provides 
part-time home nursing care and health 
education in 1 ,000 homes each day. 

Practical Nursing 
Program Expanded 

Care of the chronically ill and aged has 
been added to the program of practical 
nursing at the School of Nursing through 
the introduction of four weeks' study at 
Baltimore City Hospitals. 

In announcing the change in curric- 
ulum, Mrs. Ethel Troy, Chairman of the 
Practical Nursing Program, said that 
students have the benefit of nursing in- 
struction by City Hospital nurse faculty 
under the supervision of George Mason, 
Director of Nursing Service, and that 
they attend lectures and classes given 
by Dr. Mason F. Lord, Medical Coor- 
dinator for Chronic Diseases at City 
Hospitals and a nationally known au- 
thority on the care of the chronically ill 
and aged. 

(Continued on next page) 



C. 0. Wurzberger & Sons 



2600 Annapolis Avenue 
Baltimore 30, Md. 

VE rnon 7-2500 



Architectural M i I I w o r k 

Mouldings and Special Millwork 

Stairwork 

Frames 

Doors 

Sash 

WILLIAM WURZBERGER, President 





Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co. 
Silver Hill Concrete Co. 






Phone 

for 

CONCRETE 

RE 
5-3000 


Producers and Distributors of 

WASHED SAND & GRAVEL 
TOP SOIL • ROAD GRAVEL 
READY-MIXED CONCRETE 


Phone 

for 

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53000 








WASHINGTON 20. D.C. 








At Your Store 

or Call 

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For Delivery 



Career in Business 

Day & Evening Classes 
Complete Courses 

Secretarial (Medical & Legal) 

Stenographic, Junior Accounting. 

Write or Phone for Catalogue 

STRAYER COLLEGE 

18 N. Charles St. LE 9-5626 



The Mccormick asbestos co. 

INSULATION CONTRACTORS 

for 

HOT and COLD 

Distributors for 
Owings Corning Fibre Glass 

3620 Woodland Ave. MO 4-6040 

Baltimore, Md. 



May-June, J 96 J 



23 




CAMPUS 



STEEL FABRICATING 
STEEL WAREHOUSING 



TRADITIONS... 

Sunday services in the charming 
colonial-style chapel . . . and build- 
ings containing steel fabricated by 
Dietrich Brothers. (Yes, Dietrich 
Brothers provided the steel frame- 
work for the campus chapel, too.) 



When the job calls for steel . . . call 



DIETRICH 



BALTIMORE 18, Maryland, HOpkins 7-9700 
WASHINGTON, D. C. (Silver Spring, Md.), JU 5-0855 
RALEIGH, N. C. 708 Insurance Bide., TEmple 2-5623 









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OLES 



ENVELOPE CORPORATION 

Jjalttmore s 1 ioneer Onvelope Jrlan.ufadu.rer 

Established 1912 

Office and Factory: 25th STREET & LOCH RAVEN ROAD 

Baltimore 18, Maryland CHesapeake 3-1520 

Washington Sales Office: 2003 QUE STREET, N.W. 
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2519 PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE IAcAVCTTC Q 70t\(\ 
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N. I. H. Scholarship 

The School of Nursing has received a 
supplemental award of $14,876 from the 
National Institutes of Mental Health. 
Bethesda, Maryland. 

In announcing the award, Dr. Flor- 
ence M. Gipe, Dean of the School of 
Nursing, said that its purpose is to 
provide assistance to nurses working 
toward the master's degree in nursing 
with a major in psychiatric nursing. 



Mrs. Richardson Receives 
Fellowship 

Mrs. Julia Richardson, Assistant Profes- 
sor of Nursing at the School of Nursing, 
has been awarded a fellowship from the 
U. S. Public Health Service for full- 
time graduate study in the University 
of Maryland Department of Psychology 
toward a Doctor of Philosophy degree. 
Mrs. Richardson has been with the 
University for the past seven years. She 
holds a B.S. degree from McCoy Col- 
lege, The Johns Hopkins University, and 
an M.S. degree in psychiatric nursing 
from the Graduate School of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. For the past two 
years she has taught clinical nursing to 
students working toward the M.S. 
degree at the University of Maryland. 



School of 

PHARMACY 



Dr. Norman J. Doorenbos 



Alumnus Serves 
on Brand Names Board 

Dr. Milton Elsberg, Ph.G. '32, Presi- 
dent of Drug Fair Drug Stores, Arling- 
ton, Virginia, has been reelected to the 
Board of Directors of Brand Names 
Foundation, Inc. 

In 1935 Dr. Elsberg was Manager of 
Southern Drug Company, and soon 
after, with his partner, founded the firm 
of which he is now President. 



Dr. Foss Elected 

Dr. Noel E. Foss, Professor of Phar- 
macy and Dean of the School of Phar- 
macy, was installed as Second Vice 
President-elect of the American Phar- 
maceutical Association at the organiza- 
tion's Chicago meeting the week of 
April 23. 

In this capacity he also becomes a 
member of the Association's Council 
for 1961-62. 



24 



the Maryland Magazine 



Graduate Students 
Win Fei i OWSHIPS 

Two graduate students have won fellow- 
ships for 1961-62. 

Edward Marlowe, working toward a 
doctor of philosophy degree in phar- 
macy, has been awarded the Robert 
Lincoln McNeil Citation Fellowship by 
the American Foundation for Pharma- 
ceutical Education and John David 
Warthen, Jr., working toward a master 
of science degree in pharmaceutical 
chemistry, has won a renewal of his 
fellowship from the American Founda- 
tion for Pharmaceutical Education. 

Both Mr. Marlowe and Mr. Warthen 
are residents of Baltimore. 



Alumni Association 

The Annual Convention of the Ameri- 
can Pharmaceutical Association and 
allied groups was held in the Hotel 
Sherman, Chicago, April 23-28. 

Many Alumni of the School of 
Pharmacy were active in the parent and 
allied groups, presenting papers, discus- 
sions, acting as secretaries. School As- 
sociation, State Board and Hospital 
groups. 

On April 26 the Alumni of the School 
of Pharmacy enjoyed an informal mid- 
day luncheon. The following responded, 
giving their professional or business 
affiliation: Marvin J. Andrews, Sutliffe 
& Case Company, Delavan, Illinois, and 
Mrs. Andrews; John Autian, University 
of Texas, Austin, Texas; Francis S. 
Balassone, Executive Secretary of the 
Maryland Board of Pharmacy; Fred J. 
Bandelin. Strong, Cobb, Arner, Cleve- 
land, Ohio; Richard H. Barry, Schering 
Corporation, Bloomfield, N. J.; Andrew 
J. Bartilucci, Dean, St. John's Univer- 
sity, Jamaica, N. Y.; Frederick Berman. 
retail pharmacist, Baltimore, and Mrs. 
Berman; Ursula Biermacher, chemist, 
Abbott Laboratories, N. Chicago, Illi- 
nois; Frank Block, retail pharmacist, 
Baltimore, and Mrs. Block; Gordon H. 
Bryan, Montana State University, Mis- 
soula, Montana; Kenneth Chan, student. 
School of Pharmacy; B. Olive Cole, 
Emeritus Professor, School of Phar- 
macy; Joseph Cohen, Executive Secre- 
tary, Maryland Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion; Mary Ann Coleman, pharmacist, 
Bayonne Hospital, Bayonne, N. J.; 
Mary W. Connelly, pharmacist, Medical 
Health Center, Baltimore; John M. 
Cross, Rutgers University, Newark, N. 
J.; John L. Cunzeman, Smith, Kline 
& French Laboratories, Philadelphia; 
Amelia C. DeDomonicis, chemist. State 
Health Department; Conrad P. Dorn, 
Jr., School of Pharmacy; Norman J. 
Doorenbos, Chemistry Department, 
School of Pharmacy; Mrs. Andrew G. 
DuMez, Baltimore; Noel E. Foss, Dean, 
School of Pharmacy; Mrs. Noel E. Foss 

(Continued on next page) 




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BRANCH OFFICE: HYATTSVILLE, MD. WArfield 7-0880 



TOWN HALL TAVERN 

TO 9-5814 

Closest Establishment to the Campus 

Mixed Drinks Delicious Pizza 

8135 Baltimore Blvd. ample parking College Park, Md. 







THE 


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CO. 










MANUFACTURERS AND PRINTERS 


OF ENVELOPES 












1020 WEST PRATT 


STREET 








Phone 


MUlberry 


5-6070 






Baltimore 


23. 


Md. 



King Bros., Inc 

PRINTING & OFFSETTING 

SAratoqo 7-5835 

208 N. Calvert Street 
BALTIMORE 2. MD. 



PURE 



Meat Products 




BRIGGS & CO. 



rCOl Columbia Park Rd. SP 2-7000 

Landover, Md. 



May-June, 1961 



25 



Serving the medical profession for over 40 
years 

EQUIPMENT and SUPPLIES 

for Ihe 

■ HOSPITAL • LABORATORY • INDUSTRY 

•PHYSICIAN -SURGEON -NURSE 




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SURGICAL INSTRUMENT CO., INC. 

1421 MARYLAND AVENUE 

Baltimore 1, Md. 

SArotoga 7-7333 

Parking Facilities Available 



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THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



WINDOW • ON - THE ■ KITCHEN 

Kitcketesua 

SELF-SERVICE 
Delicious food . . . All our d««ierli or* 
home-made popular prices . . 

no tipping ... air conditioned 

BREAKFAST - LUNCHEON 

DINNER Quality Coffee 5c a cup 

Open Daily and Sunday 

11 th Street Entrance of 

HOTEL HARRINGTON 

11th & E Irs., N.W. Washington, D.C. 



TASTE THE DIFFERENCE 
QUALITY MAKES! 



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ALL MEAT FRANKS 

Every ounce of the pure beef and 
pork in Esskay's all-meat Franks 
is carefully selected by Esskay's 
experts, who season and spice 
these famous franks to whole- 
some, flavorful perfection. Be 
sure to ask for Esskay Franks — 
they're the finest made! They're 
on sale in the Byrd Stadium and 
new Student Activities Building. 
SCHLUDERBERG - KURDLE CO., INC. 



and her guest, Mrs. F. E. Poulson, Chi- 
cago; Alvin M. Geser, Secretary, New 
Jersey Pharmaceutical Association, 
Trenton, N. J.; Sam A. Goldstein, Pres- 
ident, Metropolitan Pharmaceutical As- 
sociation, Maryland, and Mrs. Gold- 
stein; Harold M. Goldfeder, President, 
Maryland Pharmaceutical Association; 
Samuel W. Goldstein, staff, American 
Pharmaceutical Association, Washing- 
ton; Salvadore J. Greco, Dean, Creigh- 
ton University, Omaha, Nebraska; Ur- 
sula E. Heyer, Chief Pharmacist, Johns 
Hopkins Hospital; Oscar Klioze, A. H. 
Robins Co., Richmond; Robert H. 
Klotzman, Lt. Col. USAF Retired, 
Great Falls, Montana; Albert Mattocks, 
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 
Michigan; Bernard Misek, Vick Chem- 
ical Company, Mt. Vernon, N. Y.: 
Alexander Ogrinz, State Board of 
Pharmacy, Baltimore; Joseph S. Rowe, 
Abbott Laboratories, Chicago, Illinois; 
John J. Sciarra, St. John's University, 
Jamaica, N. Y.; Margaret Sherwood, St. 
Luke's Hospital, Cleveland, Ohio; 
Charles J. Schwartz, Ciba Corporation, 
Springfield, N. J.; Harkishan Singh, 
Post Doctorate Fellow, School of Phar- 
macy; John F. Wannenwetsch, retail 
pharmacist, Baltimore; and Kenneth L. 
Waters, Dean, School of Pharmacy, 
University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia. 



School of 

SOCIAL WORK 



Dean Lewis Receives 
Social Science Assignments 

Dr. Verl S. Lewis, Dean of the School 
of Social Work, has been elected to 
membership on the Board of Directors 
of the Council on Social Work Educa- 
tion for a three-year term, 1961-64. 

As the official accrediting body for 
social work education, the Council sets 
standards for the 60-odd graduate pro- 
fessional schools of social work in the 
United States and Canada, the several 
hundred colleges that offer undergrad- 
uate programs in social welfare, and the 
many social agencies that participate in 
professional education. 

Besides accrediting graduate profes- 
sional schools, the Council on Social 
Work Education provides consultation 
service to professional schools and un- 
dergraduate departments of social wel- 
fare, conducts research, and issues pub- 
lications. 

Dean Lewis has also received appoint- 
ment as a consultant-associate of Com- 
munity Research Associates, Inc., of 
New York City. 




Thomas E. Carroll 
& Son 

LANDSCAPE CONTRACTING 

Tree Moving 
Trees Shrubs 

Sodding Grading 

EVergreen 4-6400 

15710 Colesville Road 

SILVER SPRING, MARYLAND 



THE ^===^===== 
LORD CALVERT 
HOTEL AND COTTAGES 

Vjour ^Trienalu J^tosts 

Just eight miles from Washington, 
near the University of Maryland, 
you'll find complete comfort and 
conveniences. 

Phone AP 7-4493 
For Reservations 

Free TV — Free Parking 

On U. S. Highway No. 1 
7200 BALTIMORE AVENUE 
COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



BETHESDA CINDER BLOCK 
MANUFACTURING CO., Inc. 

Complete Line of 

MASONRY SUPPLIES 

BRICK - CINDER BLOCK 

River Rd. at B & O R.R. OL 4-1616 

BETHESDA, MD. 



i^fcj^a 



HOTEL 



PLY CO. 



EST. Purveyors of Fine 1927 

MEATS - POULTRY 

Frozen Foods 
Food Specialties 

To Hotel*. 

Institution*. Shins. 

Clubs, Etc. 



LExington 9-7055 

Night Service VA 5-7145 

227 S. 

Hanover St. 



26 



baltimore. md. 
the Maryland Magazine 



This nonprofit organization, a pioneer 
in social research, has developed fam- 
ily-centered services in many communi- 
ties throughout the country, aimed at 
preventing people from becoming com- 
munity problems because of chronic 
illness or disordered behavior and at 
restoring them to productive citizenship. 

A two-year program in Washington 
County, Maryland, conducted in 1955- 
57 by the Community Research Asso- 
ciates in cooperation with the Hagers- 
town health and welfare agencies, led 
to the development of community tech- 
niques for coping with family situations 
that lead to chronic dependency. 

Dr. Lewis has been assisting Commu- 
nity Research Associates, Inc. and the 
Hartley-Salmon Child Guidance Clinic 
of Hartford, Connecticut, in a study of 
the clinic's service. As a consultant- 
associate he will help to plan and eval- 
uate the organization's research and 
demonstration activities. 



UNIVERSITY 
COLLEGE 



(formerly College of 
Continuation Studies) 



Special and 
G. Allen Sager 



Tuition Increase in Europe 

Tuition rates for students in the Euro- 
pean Division will be increased from 
$10 to $12 per semester hour, effective 
July 1. 

The European Division comprises 
centers in thirteen foreign countries in 
Europe, North Africa, the Near East, 
and the United Kingdom. 

The $10 rate in the European Divi- 
sion has been in effect for ten years. 
Tuition was raised to $12 in the State- 
side and North Atlantic Programs in 
the Summer of 1959. 

The tuition increase will not be felt 
until September 1961, since term five 
in the European Division, the summer 
term, will be under way prior to July 1. 



General Stamps on Advisory 
Council 

General T. Dodson Stamps U. S. Army 
retired. Assistant Dean for Military 
Studies, has accepted an invitation to 
serve as a member of the Joint Army, 
Navy, Air Force Advisory Council at 
Princeton University. 

The function of the Council is to 
assist the Military Departments of In- 
struction at Princeton University in the 
accomplishment of their assigned mis- 

(Continued on next page) 




MASSEY- FERGUSON, INC. 

BALTIMORE BRANCH 

YORK & TIMONIUM ROADS 
TIMONIUM, MARYLAND 

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May-June, 196 J 



27 



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sions by advising the chairman of those 
departments and others in authority on 
matters of policy. 



Deppe Reports on Law 
Enforcement Programs 

Mr. Donald A. Deppe, Assistant Direc- 
tor of Conferences and Institutes, re- 
cently published an article on law 
enforcement training in the law enforce- 
ment professional journal Police. 

Mr. Deppe's article, "A Decade of 
Service to Law Enforcement Personnel," 
reported on several pioneering law en- 
forcement programs which have been 
provided through the University's re- 
sources in the past decade. 

Among these programs are the Law 
Enforcement Institute initiated as the 
Police Training Institute in 1950; The 
Delinquency Control Institute, a train- 
ing program for law enforcement offi- 
cers working with juveniles; The Mary- 
land Traffic Institute, offered to supple- 
ment the knowledge of law enforcement 
officials concerning technical and legal 
problems of law enforcement and acci- 
dent prevention; The Police Professional 
Advancement Program, offering a Police 
Professional Advancement Certificate 
for satisfactory completion of 30 credit 
hours of academic college courses; and 
The Crime Control Curriculum, a four- 
year college curriculum offered through 
the Department of Sociology of the De- 
partment of Arts and Sciences and lead- 
ing to the Bachelor of Arts degree. 

The article appeared in the July- 
August, 1960 issue of Police and lim- 
ited numbers of reprints are available 
from the author. 



Space Education Institute 

A Space Education Institute, to bring 
public school teachers up to date on 
scientific developments of the approach- 
ing space age, was held in Baltimore 
March 6-9 by University College. 

Costs of the institute were partially 
underwritten by the Martin Company. 

Lectures, nine in all, were held on 
successive Monday evenings in the Uni- 
versity's Health Sciences Library Audi- 
torium. 

The highlight of the program was the 
May 8 meeting, at which distinguished 
scientists and humanists on the Univer- 
sity faculty discussed the cultural split 
that exists today, as described in C. P. 
Snow's book, The Two Cultures and the 
Scientific Revolution. 

Faculty members emphasized the re- 
sponsibility of the scientist to consider 
the needs of humanity and the equal 
responsibility of the humanist to in- 
crease public understanding of the 
power of science to destroy or better 
I he human race. 



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Dispensing and Manufacturing 
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Complete Optical Laboratory 
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28 



the Maryland Magazine 



SOCIAL NOTES 



Engagements 

Miss Patricia Ann Metz, A. & S. '58, 
to James F. Russell of Los Angeles. A 
June wedding is planned. 

Miss Janet Kost of Northfield, Illinois, 
to Mr. Edward M. Downey, Mil. Sci. 
'52. Mr. Downey is now associated with 
the J. Walter Thompson Company in 
Chicago. 

Weddings 

Miss Betty Ann Ogburn, Educ. '54, to 
Robert B. West on July 9, 1960 in 

Newport News, Virginia. 



COMPLETED 
CAREERS 

George C. Cook 

George C. Cook, a founder of the Ter- 
rapin Club and President of the Harry 
B. Cook Co., a food brokerage firm, 
died January 21, in Prince Georges 
General Hospital. 

Mr. Cook helped found the Terrapin 
Club, which sponsors athletic and edu- 
cational scholarships, in the 1940s and 
was its first President. He also was 
chairman of the University of Maryland 
Educational Foundation. 

Of the University's last 135 football 
games, Mr. Cook missed no home games 
and only two others. He was a friend 
of the coaches and many of the players. 

He is survived by his wife, Edith, two 
children, five grandchildren and a 
brother. 



Lt. Cmdr. Charles W. Cairnes 

Lt. Cmdr. Charles W. Cairnes, Mary- 
land Agricultural College, '94, died on 
February 18, at Walter Reed Hospital, 
Bethesda, Maryland. 

Commander Cairnes entered the 
Coast Guard serving in the Spanish 
American War. He was retired in 1916, 
but was recalled the following year, 
served during World War I and con- 
tinued on active duty until November, 
1934. 

(Continued on next page) 



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Millard E. Tydings 

Millard E. Tydings, Maryland Agricul- 
tural College, '10, Law '13, who repre- 
sented Maryland in the United States 
Senate for 24 years, died on February 
9, at his home near Havre de Grace. 

Mr. Tydings' career began as a Havre 
de Grace newsboy and reached its 
height when, as chairman of the Senate 
Armed Services Committee, he was con- 
sidered one of the best informed men 
on military affairs in the world. 

In the Maryland House of Delegates 
after World War I, Mr. Tydings was 
selected as its Speaker in 1920. In 1922, 
he announced his candidacy for the 
Democratic congressional nomination. 
It was in this campaign that he enun- 
ciated many of the principles to which 
he adhered throughout his congressional 
career. He asserted that he was for 
reduction in governmental expenses, for 
reduction of "red tape," bureaus and 
commissions, was for a low tariff that 
would permit fair competition and for 
modification of the Volstead Act. 

In 1926 he ran for the Senate seat 
in opposition to O. E. Weller, a Repub- 
lican stalwart, and was elected. He 
served continuously in the Senate until 
1950 when he was defeated by John M. 
Butler. 

Until the end he retained his interest 
in State and national politics. During 
the Kennedy inauguration, Mr. Tydings 
had as his house guest Governor Farriss 
Bryant of Florida. 

He retained his law practice until 
recent weeks before his illness. 

Mr. Tydings was elected President of 
the University of Maryland Alumni 
Association in 1931. He was appointed 
to the University's Board of Regents in 
1946 by Governor O'Conor. 

Besides Mrs. Tydings, Mr. Tydings 
is survived by a son and daughter, five 
grandchildren, and two sisters. 

Captain C. T. Weller 

Captain Charles T. Weller, Ag. '54, of 
Germantown and his crew of three 
were killed on January 4, when their 
B-47 jet bomber crashed and burned at 
Pease Air Force Base, New Hampshire. 

At the University he majored in 
dairying and was active in many organ- 
izations. He received the Danforth 
Fellowship Award in 1953 and was 
president of Alpha Gamma Rho, social 
fraternity. 

He leaves his wife, two daughters, 
and his parents. 

George T. O'Neill 

George T. O'Neill, A. & S. '26, former 
chief of the accounting division of the 
United States Tariff Commission, died 
January 29, 1961 at the Washington 
Sanitarium after a short illness. 



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30 



the Maryland Magazine 



Dr. Maurice C. PlNCOFFS 

Dr. Maurice C. Pincoffs, Professor of 
Medicine Emeritus of the School of 
Medicine and one of the Nation's most 
distinguished physicians, died December 
8, at the age of 74. He was on the 
medical faculty for 36 years. 

He served as Physician-in-chief at 
University Hospital from 1922 to 1954. 
According to one colleague, he had 
". . . an uncanny instinct for solving a 
difficult clinical problem; he would not 
stop until the answer was correct or as 
nearly so as humanly possible." 

He also served as head of the Medical 
School's Department of Medicine from 
1922 to 1954, and organized the cur- 
riculum within this busy Department 
while he was engaged in the practice 
of medicine. 

In 1954 Dr. Pincoffs resigned from 
the Department of Medicine to rechan- 
nel his enormous energies into organiz- 
ing a new Department of Preventive 
Medicine and Rehabilitation, which he 
directed until his retirement in 1957. 

In 1948 he pioneered Maryland's 
unique Medical Care Program which 
offers free diagnosis, treatment, and con- 
sultation to welfare patients. Many 
people consider this to be his monument. 

Dr. Pincoffs published more than 
one hundred articles. Also he edited the 
Annals of Internal Medicine from 1932 
until a few weeks before his death. 

He served his country in both wars. 
In the first, as a captain in the Medical 
Corps of the U. S. Army in France. In 
World War II, in spite of his advancing 
years, he served in the Pacific Theater 
as a colonel in the Medical Corps. 

Surviving Dr. Pincoffs are his wife, 
the former Katherine Randall, two sons, 
a daughter, and a brother. 

Dr. August W. Raspet 

Dr. August W. Raspet, A. & S. '42, Head 
of the Aerophysics Department of the 
Engineering and Industrial Research 
Station, Mississippi State University, 
died on April 27. 

After joining Mississippi State in 
1949, Dr. Raspet built up the Aero- 
physics Department to a half-million 
dollar a year program. Practically all 
of his research was financed by con- 
tracts with the Army and the Office of 
Naval Research. 

As far as records show, it is believed 
that Dr. Raspet was the first man to 
receive a Ph.D. degree in Physics from 
this University. 

Dr. Raspet is survived by his wife 
and three children. 



Donald J. Kurz 

Donald J. Kurz, BPA, '49, died on Octo- 
ber 7. Mr. Kurz was employed as a 
salesman for the P. Lorillard Company. 



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May-June, 1961 



31 



Directory of Advertisers 



Acme Iron Works 30 

Alcazar ...... 22 

American Disinfectant Company .SO 

American Telephone & Telegraph Company 

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Anchor I '■ ist Products Co., Inc 22 

Aristocrat Linen Supply Co., luc 30 

Arundel Federal Savings & Loan Assn 29 

I! & II Exterminators, Inc 19 

Baltimore Envelope Company 25 

Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. Inside Front Cover 

Hank of Crisfield 28 

Herrmann's Laundry 25 

Bethesda Cinder Block Mfg. Co., Inc. . . 26 

F. W. Bolgiano & Co 21 

Bon Ton Saratoga Food Products 28 

Briggs Construction Co., Inc. 38 

Briggs & Company 25 

Thomas E. Carroll & Son 26 

I). Harry Chambers, Opticians 29 

Cloverland Farms Dairy 18 

Dietrich & Gambrill, Inc SI 

Dietrich Bros., Inc 24 

Domino Restaurant 28 

Embassy Dairy 25 

Farmers Cooperative Assn 31 

First Federal Savings S; Loan Assn 21 

First National Bank 19 

Foreign Motors, Ltd 27 

Fuller & d' Albert, Inc 28 

Albert F. Goetze Packing Co 22 

Gray Concrete Pipe Co 29 

Harrington Hotel 26 

In Town Motor Hotels 29 

Johnston. Lemon & Co 27 

Frank B. Jones. Optician 28 

King Brothers, Inc.. Printing 25 

E. II. ECoester Bakery Co 28 

Kramer Hardware & Supply 19 



Lankford Hotel 22 

Lord Calvert Hotel 26 

Lustine-Nicholson Chevrolet 30 

G. B. Macke Corp. 29 

Maria's Restaurant 28 

Mario's Restaurant 22 

Maryland Hotel Supply Co 26 

Massey-Ferguson 27 

Modern Machinist Co 29 

Murray-Baumgartner Co. 26 



McCormick Asbestos Co 

McLeod & Romberg Stone Co., Inc. 



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New China Inn 22 

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Washington Coca Cola Bottling Works 31 

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32 



the Maryland Magazine 



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Bell Telephone scientists recently trans- 
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on a beam of •"coherent" infrared light. 

To do this they used their new Optical 
Maser — a revolutionary device which may 
someday make light a new medium for 
telephone, TV and data communications. 

Here's why: 

Light waves vibrate tens of millions of 
times faster than ordinary radio waves. 
Because of these high frequencies, light 
beams have exciting possibilities for han- 
dling enormous amounts of information. 

Ordinary light waves — the kind put out 
by your living room lamp — move like an 
unruly mob. Coherent light waves, on the 
other hand, move like disciplined ranks of 
soldiers. Theoretically they can be con- 
trolled, directed and modulated just as 
radio waves are now. 

The possibilities are breath-taking. 
Light beams might be transmitted through 
long pipes, or could someday be just what 



are needed for communications in space 
—for example, between space ships. 

Many other uses for coherent light 
beams in science and in the field of com- 
munications are being thought of as Bell 
Laboratories experiments go forward. 
Continuing research like this requires ade- 
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we can bring you the latest service im- 
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Bell Laboratories scientist adjusts new Optical Maser 
model, first such that operates continuously. Maser 
uses very little power, transmits narrowest light beam 
ever achieved. Name stands for "Microwave Amplifi- 
cation by Stimulated Emission of Radiation." 




BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM 






I 



51